Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Fall of Light (Kharkanas Trilogy) Hardcover – 26 Apr 2016

3.2 out of 5 stars 37 customer reviews

See all 11 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover, 26 Apr 2016
£13.96 £16.15

Man Booker International Prize Shortlist 2017
Take a look at our selection of Man Booker International Prize 2017 shortlisted books. Learn more
click to open popover

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Hardcover: 864 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books (26 April 2016)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0765323575
  • ISBN-13: 978-0765323576
  • Product Dimensions: 16.2 x 0.2 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (37 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,712,718 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Product description

Review

"Erikson is a master of lost and forgotten epochs, a weaver of ancient epics."
--"Salon"
"Erikson has no peer when it comes to action and imagination, and joins the ranks of Tolkien and Donaldson in his mythic vision and perhaps then goes one better."--"SF Site
""Gripping, fast-moving, delightfully dark, with a masterful and unapologetic brutality reminiscent of George R. R. Martin...Utterly engrossing."--Elizabeth Haydon
"This masterwork of imagination may be the high-water mark of epic fantasy."--Glen Cook

Erikson is a master of lost and forgotten epochs, a weaver of ancient epics. "Salon"

Erikson has no peer when it comes to action and imagination, and joins the ranks of Tolkien and Donaldson in his mythic vision and perhaps then goes one better. "SF Site"

Gripping, fast-moving, delightfully dark, with a masterful and unapologetic brutality reminiscent of George R. R. Martin Utterly engrossing. "Elizabeth Haydon"

This masterwork of imagination may be the high-water mark of epic fantasy. "Glen Cook""

Erikson is a master of lost and forgotten epochs, a weaver of ancient epics. Salon

Erikson has no peer when it comes to action and imagination, and joins the ranks of Tolkien and Donaldson in his mythic vision and perhaps then goes one better. SF Site

Gripping, fast-moving, delightfully dark, with a masterful and unapologetic brutality reminiscent of George R. R. Martin Utterly engrossing. Elizabeth Haydon

This masterwork of imagination may be the high-water mark of epic fantasy. Glen Cook

"

"Erikson is a master of lost and forgotten epochs, a weaver of ancient epics." --Salon

"Erikson has no peer when it comes to action and imagination, and joins the ranks of Tolkien and Donaldson in his mythic vision and perhaps then goes one better." --SF Site

"Gripping, fast-moving, delightfully dark, with a masterful and unapologetic brutality reminiscent of George R. R. Martin...Utterly engrossing." --Elizabeth Haydon

"This masterwork of imagination may be the high-water mark of epic fantasy." --Glen Cook

Book Description

International bestselling author of The Malazan Book of the Fallen continues his new epic fantasy sequence, the Kharkanas Trilogy, in this enthralling, all-embracing new novel of war and betrayal, dark sorcery and ancient gods... --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

See all Product description

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The malazan universe is quite possibly my favourite in fantasy: rich, intricately plotted and utterly unique. In the original book of the fallen series, the balance worked well - Eriksson's writing style can, to me anyway, occasionally become over the top and overly portentous, but the characterisation and action were beautifully done and engaging, and the books are hence some of the most memorable I've read.

However, this book is so, so difficult to get through - and this is speaking as a fan, who has read all of the joint malazan universe books, and will still probably read book 3 of this series. At its heart there are still some fascinating themes, storylines and character development, but they are buried under pages and pages of tedious, melodramatic, and largely pointless dialogue and scenes that seem designed to lend the book an ominous air, but are just such a hard and unenjoyable slog as a reader. I frequently found my eyes glazing over and scanning through sections, and I feel this book could have cut about 300 pages and 50 characters and been far better for it.

But to be fair - across 12 malazan books, having 10 great ones (felt similarly about toll the hounds) is still a pretty great achievement, and hopefully the final book of the series is back on form. As an aside, after several poor outings, which were similarly difficult to read to this book, Eriksson's co-founder of the series Ian Esslemont has absolutely knocked it out of the park with Dancers Lament - beautifully written and paced, and one of the most purely enjoyable and fun books I've read for a long time.
Comment 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I am a huge Steven Erikson fan - his ability to create deep, dark fantasy, filled with incredible, real characters is unsurpassed. It pains me to say, this book is hard work, with almost Shakespearean-like use of language, and long rambling mono/dialogue that does little to advance the lore. One for diehard fans only.
Comment 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I cannot believe I am writing this...

I have been a huge fan of the malazan series from 6 years ago when a friend leant me Gardens of The Moon. The lore, the action, the depth of characters and the world building was aided by a perfect balance between pace and revelations.

The Malazan Book of the Fallen in my opinion is the best series I have EVER read. And I have read a LOT of fantasy books. Every spare second I had would go on every Malazan release until I finished it within a day. But this, this has taken me weeks rather than a day.

Forge of Kharjanas was decent, all be it a little disappointing.

So I hoped this book would drive the story forward. Sadly, this is not the case.

This book is about 7% action/revelations/exciting content and 93% naval gazing/amateur phiosophising. Somehow in between books, almost every character has became a philosopher. Normally about war. But also about existence. And love. And I mean pretty much EVERY character. From Anomander Rake down to Urusanders daughter, every character waxes (un)lyrical about something. Every chapter is filled with page after page of internal musings. And, though the words are different, the feeling generated is the same. Boredom. Unrelenting boredom. Hence why it took me weeks rather than a day. I was finding excuses not to read this book but, because it Erikson and the Malazan universe, I had to finish it.

The story itself advances a little bit with the last 10% or so actually covering some ground (in between the philosophising and musings about life). Anomander, possibly the coolest character in the Malazan world, does absolutely zero. The Azathanai story moves on a bit.
Read more ›
2 Comments 19 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Following on from Forge of Darkness, Erikson delivers an excellent continuation into the third installment with Fall of Light, where the looming civil war seems to reach the climax built up to within Forge of Darkness. Erikson masterfully portrays the tragedy and pointlessness of the looming clash between Light and Dark from the start, all from one single theme that casts a terribly tragic twist to the events as they unfold. We learn more on the dragons, Azathanai and their schemes, with the usual humour often present in Erikson's work as a welcome contrast to the more heavier scenes present within the book. I found myself enjoying the Jaghut storyline, where we meet some familiar Jaghut faces and their ironic laughter from previous Malazan installments that some may recognise, without this arc detracting from the overall plot.

I can see how some may find the worldly introspections by the characters a struggle to read through, I however enjoy the revelations and observations arrived at by the characters that can easily be attributed to our own modern day lives, and feel that it is a testament to Erikson's writing ability to incorporate these observations within a fantasy world without breaking realism within his books. It is these incorporations that I feel set Erikson as one of the best authors in the Fantasy genre.

I can't wait for the third and last installment in the trilogy, where hopefully some major answers will be present that shed light on how certain characters evolved into what we see of them within the Malazan book of the Fallen. I am more than sure Erikson will deliver another exceptional installment!
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category