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Life on the Refrigerator Door by [Kuipers, Alice]
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Life on the Refrigerator Door Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 74 customer reviews

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Product Description

Review

Funny and sad and beautiful and shocking all at once (Sugarscape)

Review

"Very original and touching" -- Joanne Harris

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 880 KB
  • Print Length: 239 pages
  • Publisher: Macmillan; Reprints edition (4 Sept. 2008)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003H29C6G
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 74 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #39,375 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
A very different way of writing a book, but a very clear message underneath the surface. (For Women) Hope you don't have mascara on because you will definetly have tiny tears. A quick read but in a good way, Enjoy!
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Format: Paperback
Claire and her mum don't have the best of relationships and the only way in which they actually appear to communicate with each other is via the medium of the refrigerator door in the form of notes. The fact is Claire is far too busy being a teenager - out with friends, having a boyfriend and generally just having a life - whereas her mother is far too busy working to provide for herself and her daughter. Which means that their only method of communication is indeed on their refrigerator door. But one day, one note is going to turn Claire and her mums world completely upside down...

I must admit that I do feel a little cheated by the book. It's 226 pages long but it's absolutely not 226 pages full of writing. Because the book is told in notes there's only one note per page and some of the notes are only a few lines long so I managed to finish the book in under an hour. It is a unique way of trying to tell a story but to be honest, after finishing it, I'm still not totally convinced it worked. I mean the quotes from the magazines say it's "heartbreaking" and "guaranteed to make me cry" but I never felt either of those emotions whilst reading the book.

The idea of a mother and daughter being so far apart that they only communicate via notes is actually pretty sad. What mother or daughter cannot find the time to talk to each other for at least an hour a day? And, to be honest, the notes don't even really have a ring of truth to them. They seem forced - despite the fact Claire doodles all over her drawings which is obviously an attempt from the author to get us to be able to know Claire a bit better and to make her more real to us. But for me it didn't really work.
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By Helen Simpson VINE VOICE on 27 Aug. 2007
Format: Hardcover
I wasn't sure I was going to like the note style of writing but it was actually very easy to read. Because you can read the book in 20 minutes it almost doesn't feel like a 'proper' book. However it has both a story and characters who I found engaging.

It gives an insight into a relationship between a mother and her 15 year old daughter, not just a glimpse of their everyday lives but their worries and concerns when the mother has a health scare. The author captures the confusing and conflicting emotions both of them experience and although short, it's to the point and gets across what I feel was intended; Not only to appreciate and enjoy those we sometimes take for granted but also to communicate with each other. That doesn't mean just telling someone we love them but appreciating that we need to share our happiness and our inner worries with them too sometimes.

It made me cry (I think you'd have to be made of stone not to be moved by it), but maybe the last couple of pages were over too quickly because I would have liked to have felt more uplifted by it.
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Format: Hardcover
I read this for the first time a couple of years ago and I can still pick it up, open it at random notes and be still reading it several minutes later. It still makes me cry to read the last couple of notes.

I've read a few of the reviews here - both positive and negative, so I thought I'd put my own in. Firstly, I can see why some people have put negative comments - it is a short book, there isn't an in-depth story, the characters don't spring to life, some notes seem pointless as they take less than a second to read.

But I don't think it needed anymore.

Speaking like many people,as someone who knows what Claire is going through until the end (I can't say I know what that's like and I'm hoping I won't have to for a while yet) I found this book very moving and very to-the-point. It wasn't fussy and melodramatic, which would've spoilt it, the notes were very short, very general, very random at times - but they did give you an idea of what went on in between the notes - when mother and daughter did actually meet and talk together. Some people have said it was a shock that they didn't talk enough - maybe they did, we don't know because the book's not about their conversations, it's about the notes they left and we don't need anything else.

What I like about it is that it pins down the whole situation. Okay it doesn't go into detail- it doesn't follow the whole story or spend time showing big emotional episodes between the characters - but it does highlight a few things. Like I said, I can relate to what Claire's going through and contrary to what a couple of people have said, I thought it was very real. It isn't an easy subject to approach or to talk about - especially with the cancer-sufferer.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A kind of epistolary, this is a truly unique book. There is no narrator, no paragraphs of action: the entire story is told by post-it notes left by a mother and her daughter on the family fridge. In this way, you are completely drawn into the events of their lives, and as things begin to spiral out of control for both of them, I guarantee you that you will feel what the characters feel.
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