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The Unknown Life of Jesus Christ Paperback – 1 Dec 1980

3.4 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

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Paperback, 1 Dec 1980
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Product details

  • Paperback: 62 pages
  • Publisher: Tree of Life Publications (1 Dec. 1980)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0960285016
  • ISBN-13: 978-0960285013
  • Product Dimensions: 28.1 x 21.3 x 0.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,324,464 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

3.4 out of 5 stars
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Format: Paperback
Before we look at matters pertaining to the plausibility, feasibility and rationality of this book, this reviewer thinks that it is important that the potential purchaser and reader is informed about the background to this undoubtedly interesting little volume.

Nicolas Notovitch was a Russian doctor who, in the 1890s, journeyed extensively throughout India, Afghanistan and Tibet. His journeying took him through a variety of remote places such as the passes of Bolan, across the Punjab, and eventually into the beautiful and historic Vale of Kashmir of the Himalayas. On one such voyage, whilst he was visiting Leh, the main city of Ladak, Notovitch broke his leg in an accident. 'Fate' had ordained, thus, that he ought to sojourn for a time of convalescing at the Himis convent.

It was apparently during this period of healing that Notovitch was informed that ancient writings, chronicling the life of Jesus Christ existed. Subsequently, he traced and studied a Tibetan rendition of these writings and copied down in his journal in excess of two hundred verses from the curious document referred to as "The Life of St. Issa."

Furthermore, Notovitch was shown two large yellowed volumes containing the supposed biography of St. Issa. The Russian medic then enlisted one of his travelling companions to translate these Tibetan volumes, while he copied down each verse in the rear of his journal.

Moving the story on some thirty years to 1925, Nicholas Roerich, another Russian, made the journey to the same convent at Himis. Roerich, was both a distinguished scientist and a philosopher.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Although a product of its time (first published 1890) and originally written in Russian, I found the descriptions of his journeys through the north-west of the Indian sub-continent and into Tibet (Thibet in this translation) keenly observed and quite fascinating to read; that said, I don't know the extent to which his adventures are true or to what extent it might be his version of 'King Solomon's Mines'. Nice touch near the beginning where he says he sought authentication of his data from the Vatican, which they couldn't provide, but, he says, they tried to buy his manuscript. Dan Brownish a hundred years before Dan Brown. What he claims to have found, after all his travels and descriptions, is evidence that a holy man called Issa, who died in the late 1st century CE and is buried in Srinagar, Kashmir, was also known as Yuz Asaf. The grave is peculiar to the extent that the interrment is said to be east-west and is marked by a stone carving of two feet with what it said to be the imprint of nails having been driven through them. The site also contains the remains of Syed Naseerudin, a medieval Sufi saint (buried north-south) and both are recognized as Moslem holy men by locals who visit the shrine.

The Yuz Asaf grave was first mentioned in 112 CE and (plot spoiler) Nicolas Notovitch identifies him as Jesus Christ. Various people have tried that. The New Testament is silent about what Jesus did in his youth. Apart from one anecdote when he was 12, the thirty-odd years between his birth and ministry are not accounted for by the Gospel writers, leaving room for speculation. The sayings of Jesus, as quoted, are not at odds with Bhuddist teachings, so one has the option of imagining that he trained in India. Or at Qumran.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The first half of the book tells the rather irrelevant story of Nicolas Notovitch's travels leading to discovering this text and I found this historic account far more engaging than the actual 'Jesus was here' aspect. However I certainly do not dismiss the possibilities for the factual truth of the core translation this books offers; it is certainly tenable.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Excellent to have this work published once again. However I wish the paper thickness was more substantial and the hard back more easily handled.
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