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Licensed to Hug: How Child Protection Policies Are Poisoning the Relationship Between the Generations and Damaging the Voluntary Sector Paperback – 30 Jun 2008

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Product details

  • Paperback: 80 pages
  • Publisher: Civitas:Institute for the Study of Civil Society (30 Jun. 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1903386705
  • ISBN-13: 978-1903386705
  • Package Dimensions: 19.4 x 12 x 0.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 827,422 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Synopsis

Since the establishment of the Criminal Records Bureau in 2002, more than a third of British adults have had to get a certificate to say they are safe to be near children, and the numbers affected are increasing. Frank Furedi and Jennie Bristow argue that the growth of police vetting has created a sense of mistrust. Communities are forged through the joint commitment of adults to the socialisation of children. Now, adults are afraid to interact with any child not their own. The generations are becoming distant, as adults suspect each other and children are taught to suspect adults. The vetting culture encourages risk aversion: there is a feeling that it is better to ignore young people, even if they are behaving in an anti-social manner, and even if they are in trouble and need help, rather than risk accusations of improper conduct.Vetting also gives a false sense of security as it can only identify those who have offended in the past and been caught - not what people will do after they are passed as fit to be near children. "Licensed to Hug" argues for a more common-sense approach to adult/child relations, based on the assumption that the vast majority of adults can be relied on to help and support children, and that the healthy interaction between generations enriches children's lives.

About the Author

Frank Furedi is Professor of Sociology at the University of Kent in Canterbury. During the past decade his research has been concerned with the culture of fear in relation to issues such as health, children, education, food, terrorism and new technology. Since the publication of his study Paranoid Parenting (new edition to be published in October 2008), Furedi has explored problems associated with inter-generational relations, education and childhood. Currently he is writing a book-Lost In Education-that questions the way society educates children and young people.Jennie Bristow is a journalist and mother of two pre-school girls. She writes the monthly 'Guide to Sub-versive Parenting' for the online publication spiked (www.spiked-online.com), and summer 2008 sees the launch of her new website Parents With Attitude. (www.parentswithattitude.com)


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20 July 2009
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Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars 1 reviews
Junglies
5.0 out of 5 starsExploring the myths of social policy
22 October 2002 - Published on Amazon.com
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