Kindle Price: £4.74

Save £3.25 (41%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.
kindle unlimited logo
Unlimited reading. Over 1 million titles. Learn more
Read for £0.00
OR

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Letters From Yelena by [Mankowski, Guy]
Kindle App Ad

Letters From Yelena Kindle Edition

4.2 out of 5 stars 17 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
£4.74

Length: 256 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

Kindle Monthly Deal
Browse a new selection of discounted Kindle Books each month. Shop now

Product description

Review

It's unusual to find a young male writer who can write with such sensitivity and maturity. Guy Mankowski's portrayal of the ballerina Yelena is wholly convincing, taking us inside her thoughts and feelings as she describes the course of her life, from harrowing childhood to professional success, punctuated with turbulent emotional crisis. This is clearly a writer of great talent. --Dr. Andrew Crumey, Longlisted for The Man Booker Prize

Letters from Yelena, is a fantastic literary achievement, instantly setting aside any concerns over a difficult second novel for this immensely talented north east author. Following on from his excellent debut, The Intimates, this novel is an intimate character study of a highly skilled, yet psychologically scarred ballerina, told in epistolary form. The epistolary form is often seen as a rather old-fashioned literary device, but here, Mankowski breathes new life into it, creating a captivating, engaging narrative which plucks at our heart-strings. It's clear that the novel has been excellently researched Mankowski was awarded a grant by the Arts Council to visit the world-famous ballet school in St Petersburg and, in his acknowledgements, he also states he has spent a great deal of time with dancers from a school in the north east of England but this is far more than simply an information-dump. There is a real, honest-to-goodness story here. And the way Mankowski tells it? Astounding. The characters are delicately described. The atmosphere created is tangible. The language pirhouettes, spins, soars: some of the imagery is simply brilliant. More: the comparisons between dancing and writing are great. --A J Kirby

I felt I was watching a ballet in a darkened theatre, unable to look away until the story had unfolded, so beautifully, before my eyes. From opening this book on Thursday I was unable to put it down until I had finished it. More than that, I was talking about it through dinner, and thinking about it too. It is wonderfully written, and I was fascinated by the world of the ballet. --Ruth Dugdall

I finished Letters from Yelena in two sittings. The mental and physical strain of the professional ballet artist is almost tangible. Mankowski creates a bleak and isolated landscape, where aspiration and ambition can be crushed under the sheer weight of their own internal pressure. 'Yelena' has more emotional and intellectual depth in a chapter than the entirety of The Black Swan. Instead it harks back to something like the visual masterpiece of The Red Shoes; romantic, dark, uncompromising, and beautiful. I defy any woman, and any dancer, to not see parts of themselves in Yelena. Exceptionally talented. Thank God you don't write crime/thrillers or I'd be bitter and jealous. --Hanna Jameson, author and aspiring ballerina

‘Unfolding through the letters between a Ukrainian dancer and her lover, the novel explores art and how people use it in their lives to complex and compelling effect.’ - Attitude Magazine ‘A beautifully written story with convincing characters and a good if sometimes heart-breaking plot. Overall, a great novel from Mankowski’ - Novel Kicks ‘This epistolary novel takes the always present fascination with the torments of ballet dancers and adds a romantic twist. Mankowski brings every bruises foot and strained limb to life.’ - The Simple Things magazine 'From his time working at the Mariinsky Theatre in St. Petersburg as well as having access to the Vaganova Ballet Academy, Guy Mankowski has written a truly wonderful epistolary novel. It has shades of The Red Shoes and The Black Swan, with its dark thematic intensity of child abuse leading the main protagonist Yelena into self-harming, and ultimately suffering mental health problems.' - NewBooks Magazine

Review

It's unusual to find a young male writer who can write with such sensitivity and maturity. Guy Mankowski's portrayal of the ballerina Yelena is wholly convincing, taking us inside her thoughts and feelings as she describes the course of her life, from harrowing childhood to professional success, punctuated with turbulent emotional crisis. This is clearly a writer of great talent. (Dr. Andrew Crumey, Longlisted for The Man Booker Prize)

Letters from Yelena, is a fantastic literary achievement, instantly setting aside any concerns over a difficult second novel for this immensely talented north east author. Following on from his excellent debut, The Intimates, this novel is an intimate character study of a highly skilled, yet psychologically scarred ballerina, told in epistolary form. The epistolary form is often seen as a rather old-fashioned literary device, but here, Mankowski breathes new life into it, creating a captivating, engaging narrative which plucks at our heart-strings. It's clear that the novel has been excellently researched Mankowski was awarded a grant by the Arts Council to visit the world-famous ballet school in St Petersburg and, in his acknowledgements, he also states he has spent a great deal of time with dancers from a school in the north east of England but this is far more than simply an information-dump. There is a real, honest-to-goodness story here. And the way Mankowski tells it? Astounding. The characters are delicately described. The atmosphere created is tangible. The language pirhouettes, spins, soars: some of the imagery is simply brilliant. More: the comparisons between dancing and writing are great. (Andrew Kirby)

I felt I was watching a ballet in a darkened theatre, unable to look away until the story had unfolded, so beautifully, before my eyes. From opening this book on Thursday I was unable to put it down until I had finished it. More than that, I was talking about it through dinner, and thinking about it too. It is wonderfully written, and I was fascinated by the world of the ballet. (Ruth Dugdall)

I finished Letters from Yelena in two sittings. The mental and physical strain of the professional ballet artist is almost tangible. Mankowski creates a bleak and isolated landscape, where aspiration and ambition can be crushed under the sheer weight of their own internal pressure. 'Yelena' has more emotional and intellectual depth in a chapter than the entirety of The Black Swan. Instead it harks back to something like the visual masterpiece of The Red Shoes; romantic, dark, uncompromising, and beautiful. I defy any woman, and any dancer, to not see parts of themselves in Yelena. Exceptionally talented. Thank God you don't write crime/thrillers or I'd be bitter and jealous. (Hanna Jameson, author and aspiring ballerina)

Unfolding through the letters between a Ukrainian dancer and her lover, the novel explores art and how people use it in their lives to complex and compelling effect.’ - Attitude Magazine ‘A beautifully written story with convincing characters and a good if sometimes heart-breaking plot. Overall, a great novel from Mankowski’ - Novel Kicks ‘This epistolary novel takes the always present fascination with the torments of ballet dancers and adds a romantic twist. Mankowski brings every bruises foot and strained limb to life.’ - The Simple Things magazine 'From his time working at the Mariinsky Theatre in St. Petersburg as well as having access to the Vaganova Ballet Academy, Guy Mankowski has written a truly wonderful epistolary novel. It has shades of The Red Shoes and The Black Swan, with its dark thematic intensity of child abuse leading the main protagonist Yelena into self-harming, and ultimately suffering mental health problems.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 682 KB
  • Print Length: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Legend Press (1 Sept. 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B008PPMY9W
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars 17 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #425,223 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  • Would you like to tell us about a lower price?


Customer reviews

Read reviews that mention

Top customer reviews

17 October 2015
Format: Paperback|Verified Purchase
14 February 2015
Format: Paperback|Verified Purchase
15 October 2013
Format: Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
2 people found this helpful
|Comment|Report abuse
26 October 2013
Format: Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
One person found this helpful
|Comment|Report abuse
24 January 2013
Format: Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
30 January 2013
Format: Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
17 May 2013
Format: Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
21 January 2013
Format: Paperback|Verified Purchase

Would you like to see more reviews about this item?

click to open popover

Where's My Stuff?

Delivery and Returns

Need Help?