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Let Not the Waves of the Sea Paperback – 5 Jan 2012

4.4 out of 5 stars 22 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: John Murray (5 Jan. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 184854569X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1848545694
  • Product Dimensions: 14.1 x 2.1 x 20.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 694,357 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

'Enviably well written ...one perfect sentence after another' (FT)

'Like William Styron's moving memoir of depression, Darkness Visible, there is profound empathy here' (welovethisbook.com)

A fine meditation on what is salvaged from loss. A humane and manly book (Janice Galloway, Scotland on Sunday)

[A] moving and honest account...the book contains countless heartbreaking moments (Sunday Times)

A beautifully crafted portrait of bereavement that tells us something new about the landscape, people, customs and hardship that he encountered along the way (Sunday Telegraph)

Profoundly moving...it is impossible not to be touched (Observer)

As much a celebration of Dominic's life and the brothers' relationship as it is a lament for his passing (Daily Mail)

'An immensely moving, truthful and honest elegy. Stephenson has created something extraordinary' (Neel Mukherjee)

'An extraordinary and courageous book' (Alex Preston)

Remarkable... seldom will you find grief anatomised quite so acutely and honestly (John Preston, Sunday Telegraph Books of the Year)

'A remarkably moving and compelling read. The travelogue and biography is a celebration of his brother's life and deals courageously with the journey to understand his death in the Asian tsunami on Ko Phi Phi' (Andrew Dixon, Scotland on Sunday)

Book Description

The world changes when you lose somebody you love...

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Simon Stephenson's eulogy to his brother Dominic, who died in the Boxing Day 2004 tsunami is a wonderful book.

It is by turns beautiful, painfully personal in the intensity of the experiences described and frustrating as, in the process of grieving, Stephenson seems to ramble or retrace ground already covered. Frustrating, that is, until you, the reader, remember that that is how grieving works. Stephenson returns, over and over again to the Thai island where Dominic and his girlfriend Eileen disappeared, he looks for "signs" of them - Dominic's sandal, his wrist watch. He invents stories to smooth over the details of their loss, to pretend things could have been easier for them than probably they were.

As a memoir of grieving and loss, it is superbly, unashamedly honest.

But more than that, what really gave me pure joy from reading Let Not The Waves of The Sea was Stephenson's descriptions of Edinburgh, the city where I, too live. It was in his passages on Edinburgh and his shared memories of growing up with Dominic that his writing really took off, or perhaps my knowledge and love of the city helped me share the intimate moments he was describing.

Regardless, Stephenson is a skilled writer who has made something beautiful from his tragedy.
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Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Simon Stephenson, who has some TV writing credits to his name, here writes something which fiction could not emulate. His older brother Dominic and his girlfrind Eileen, were two of the thousands of people on Phi-Phi on the Boxing Day that the Tsunami struck. Telling the story of Dominics life through reminisences and tales of brotherly deeds shared and not shared he attempts to make sense of the loss of his brother. The book itself is moving and insightful, dealing not only with loss, but in a way coming to terms with it, he relates how he tried, and continues to try to cope. Not so much a story of a life lost, but of a life lived and remembered.
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Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
A moving account of a family's heartbreak following the Boxing Day Tsunami. Author Simon Stephenson talks us through the days and months following the disaster which claimed the life of his much loved brother. The book gives a detailed run-down of the wait for information and the challenging times ahead mixed with memories of their childhood together and the bond the author developed with those on Ko Phi Phi who shared in his heartbreak of losing loved ones. This book left me with a lump in my throat on more than one occasion and I became so engrossed in Simon's storytelling that I found myself bumping into commuters as I tried to finish a chapter on my way to work. Although we have seen the pictures/videos, I think this is a book that really hits home just what a devastating effect the tsunami had for so many but also what a special place Thailand is. It's a well written book that will stay with you long after you finish the final page.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I read this book and by the end of it I felt that I knew Dominic and grieved for his passing. That shows really gifted writing by the author. Since then I have heard him speak at the Edinburgh book festival and was lucky enough to briefly meet his equally remarkable mother and some of his friends. This young man shows real talent and I hope that this is the first of many books.
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Format: Hardcover
This is an incredibly lyrical and moving book (I cried at least four times during the course of my read - committing the terrible tears on the tube no-no at least twice),it's also funny and candid, full of searing understatement. It's been called a grief memoir, but it seems to me that the centre of the novel is Dominic himself, Simon Stephenson's brother who was killed in the 2004 Tsunami.

It's this richness of contrast that makes this book a portrait in the true sense of the word, full of light and shade and a multitude of angles on the subject matter. It is an honest and compelling exploration of loss but it is also a travel book, biography and autobiography (Dominic and Simon were born in such close proximity that the stories of the childhood are almost one and then same), even a historical and scientific account. These strands weave together and at their centre the reader is left with a space which marks the place that Dominic left in the world of his family and those who loved him.

It is Stephenson's courage and humility in weaving his strands together that make the book so haunting. Dominic was one of approximately 200,000 people who died in the disaster, each death creating it's own epicentre of loss in the lives of those left behind. Simon is realistic about Dominic's place in the magnitude of this grief, but the detail and care expended on this work can become a way to appreciate the enormity of loss as a whole - a still eye of a great storm.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
From a male perspective of losing a loved brother to the worst recorded tsunami around the Ko Pi Pi Island. The writer talks in a very mature and gentle way of losing his brother. How it affects his life and some of his family and when tragedy strikes the family in later years, he tells of how the lost of his young brother still returns because he has no-one as close to support him. Not a story full of saddness but an ongoing theme of loss. The book had some clear factual notes on how a tsunami takes place, there are medical explanations that also clarified tropical diseases and illness from our character a med-student. Some of the descriptions of the Island and its characters were superb, Highly recommend
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