FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock - order soon.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Dispatch to:
To see addresses, please
Or
Please enter a valid UK postcode.
Or
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Lehrter Station (John Russell 5) Paperback – 15 May 2012

4.3 out of 5 stars 96 customer reviews

See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 15 May 2012
£12.99
£2.50 £0.01
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£12.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock - order soon. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently bought together

  • Lehrter Station (John Russell 5)
  • +
  • Masaryk Station (John Russell 6)
  • +
  • Potsdam Station
Total price: £28.97
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Old Street Publishing (15 May 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1906964750
  • ISBN-13: 978-1906964757
  • Product Dimensions: 15.8 x 2.2 x 23.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (96 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 652,149 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Product description

Review

'Remarkable ... Downing is one of the brightest lights in the shadowy world of historical spy fiction'
Birmingham Post

'Excellent ... Downing's strength is his fleshing out of the tense and often dangerous nature of everyday life in a totalitarian state
The Times

'An extraordinary evocation of Nazi Germany'
C.J. SANSOM on Zoo Station

'Stands with Alan Furst for detail and atmosphere'
DONALD JAMES

'Outstanding'
Publishers Weekly on Lehrter Station

'Think Robert Harris and Fatherland mixed with a dash of Le Carré
Sue Baker, Publishing News

'A wonderfully drawn spy novel . . . A very auspicious debut, with more to come'
The Bookseller on Zoo Station

'Exciting and frightening all at once . . . It's got everything going for it'
Julie Walters

'An outstanding thriller . . . This series is a quite remarkable achievement'
Shots magazine --...

About the Author

David Downing grew up in suburban London. He is the author of six books in the John Russell series, Zoo Station, Silesian Station, Stettin Station, Potsdam Station, Lehrter Station, and Masaryk Station, as well as Jack of Spies, One Man's Flag, and The Red Eagles. He lives in Guildford, England --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.


What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Rowena Hoseason HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on 3 Jun. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Lehrter Station has almost nothing to do with the railway station of that name in Berlin, 1945. Nor is it truly a spy-story thriller. Instead this extended series has evolved into an historical drama, one in which the pair of protagonists return to occupied Germany after WW2, giving author David Downing a chance to flex his narrative muscle by illustrating the chaotic mess that was post-war Berlin before the wall went up.

The historical insight and detail is fascinating and has the ring of painstaking research about it. The superficial plot has Anglo-American journalist and sometime spy John Russell being tasked by the Russians with returning to Berlin to report on German communists and whether they’re likely to be loyal to Moscow in the cold war world that rises from the ashes of the Third Reich.
Yet the notional investigations that Russell performs carry less weight than the vast swathes of names and places which Downing throws at the reader: all the bombed out buildings, the endless lists of missing people, the cafes reduced to rubble, the acquaintances from previous books who must all seeming be accounted for; the unlikely resolution of so many loose ends.
Russell and Effi immediately rile a Nazi-turned-gangster, and must tread carefully amid the politics of the Allies-turned-antagonists, but much of the ‘thriller’ struggles to surface under the weight of detail. The sub-plots about the Jewish avengers, and the secret pipeline into Palestine, are entirely fascinating. But it all seemed to lack a sense of tension, somehow.

By the end of Lehrter Station I knew an enormous amount more about the immediate post-war situation than I had when I started reading it. This was a rare case where I almost drowned in the detail, and found myself longing for Alan Furst’s atmospheric brushstrokes which bring wartime Europe to grimy life in a few simple sentences, without needing chapter and verse for vermilissitude.
7/10
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Great book. Have read all the others in the series. Love them all. Great charaters and excellent plot and sub plot. Fantastic Author.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Product very good as expected
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a fascinating portrait of a society crawling out of chaos. It's not just the buildings and bridges that are reduced to rubble and ruins in post-war Berlin. The Americans are playing all sorts of games, some of them aligning themselves to ex-Nazis and the black market in order to fight the invisible war against the Soviets, whilst others appear to be totally unaware of what life was really like under Hitler's regime. The British are imperialists hanging desperately onto power, the stern teacher in the school corridor. The French are seen as inconsequential and no-one understands why they're running part of the city anyway. The Russians are playing a game of winning hearts and minds without realising that they lost them when they raped their way through the cities... as if they really care because they seem to be the only ones who have a plan. The Germans come across as befuddled victims surviving by the skin of their teeth and confused as to how all this happened in the first place... and the Jews come across as confident and fighting fit... realists in a new world.
Interesting.
I like David Downing's Berlin series. They're gripping adventures set in a dirty world. Now the war is over it's not got any cleaner and our hero, John Russell, finds himself used as a pawn by both the Soviets and the Americans. All he wants to do is survive... like most of the other characters in the novel. This isn't easy when the world is on the brink of collapse. Cigarettes are the only real currency, everything is on ration, gangsters are having a great day, peoples are in flux as they move about Europe - this is true post-apocalyptic stuff when you think about it.
It struck me, as I was reading, that I can't think of many books set in the immediate post-war period in Central Europe.
Read more ›
1 Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Jill Meyer TOP 500 REVIEWER on 12 May 2012
Format: Hardcover
David Downing's new novel, "Lerter Station", is the fifth book in his John Russell series. Begun in pre-war Berlin and continuing through the war, Downing now takes his characters in this book from London to Berlin in the fall of 1945. Russell and his girl-friend, actress Effi Koenen, return to the war-ruined city in a somewhat convoluted plot involving Soviet spies. Most plots dealing with spies in these books - Downing's, Philip Kerr's, Alan Furst's - usually have the spies double, tripling, hell, even quadruple, spying. Frankly, I got confused dealing with the who/what/why of the spying in Downing's book. So I tended to concentrate on the other parts of the story, which were far more interesting.

Life in post-war Berlin was difficult enough for the city's residents. So many buildings were damaged, so many people lost in the bombings and war battles and, of course, in the concentration camps. The city was a meeting place for the war's survivors and most people were trying to find loved ones and friends they had lost track of during the war. The city was divided into four parts - American, British, French, and Russian - and while people could move between the parts fairly easily, already the Russian Zone was taking on an ominous tone as restrictions were beginning to be put in place by the occupying Soviets. Russell has returned to do a little spying, a little reporting, and a lot of fence-mending. Effi has returned to act in a new movie, the first to be filmed in post-war Germany. She was also trying to find the father of a young Jewish girl she had sheltered during the war and was hoping to permanently adopt, as well as the daughter of a Jewish couple she had helped during the war. Downing also includes many other characters from the four earlier books.
Read more ›
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews