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Led Zeppelin IV
 
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Led Zeppelin IV

6 April 2009 | Format: MP3

£7.92 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
4:54
30
2
3:39
30
3
5:51
30
4
7:58
30
5
4:38
30
6
4:44
30
7
3:31
30
8
7:07
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Product details

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Incredible remastering job from Mr Page and team. This remastering is amongst the best I have heard this side of the King Crimson 40th Anniversary Steven Wilson releases.

No point in rehashing the contents so I will just concentrate on the sound quality. The separation of the instruments and voices is a relevation.

When The Battle of Evermore starts you can tell that this version is special. Robert Plant and Sandy Denny just sound amazing. It is possible to clearly hear each ones every note as distinctly separate voices, which I have to admit to not being able to do so before. Plant even does three part harmonies at times, again, not something that previous versions laid out so clearly. There is a great bit of Pages studio trickery towards the end of the song where he uses varying amounts of reverb to get the voices to sweep in and then move away as the harmony lines build up. Sandy Denny's voice is a wonderful foil to Plant throughout.

The steel strung acoustic guitar at the start of Stairway rings out panned hard to the left, then in come the recorders co of John Paul Jones, as he overdubs a couple of lines. You can hear the wood in the recorders here.

John Bonhams cymbals all sound properly metallic and there is a difference between them rather than just a splashy tizz, so common on all too many CDs.

The sound of Bonhams drums on Levee can now be heard coming back down from the roof after whipping up past the mics ;-)

This set has the least interesting set of outtakes though. They sound too close to the finished items to be of sustained interest.
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By carlosnightman VINE VOICE on 28 Jan. 2016
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
After a more experimental third album, the band returned to their more forceful, blues driven rock sound, although now they had acquired many more song writing qualities, techniques, and had come to the studio with a greater knowledge of the world and her music. As if to prove they were the biggest band in the world, they didn’t even put their name on the album, instead provided cover art depicting an old man carrying a bunch of sticks. It went on to be one of the biggest selling albums ever. Of course, if the songs weren’t up to scratch the album would eventually have faded away; instead it thrives today as one of the best rock albums ever, with songs eternally played on radios and ipods all over the globe. Generally regarded as their best album, each of its eight songs is a classic and even if you don’t think you’ve heard them, most have parts which are instantly recognizable.

‘Black Dog’ opens with a swirling sound giving way to a classic Plant vocal blast, followed by one of Page’s most famous riffs. This start stop technique repeats a few times giving Bonham and Jones a chance to crash, bang, and wallop in the background. It’s pretty slow for one of the all time great rock songs and there is a post-coital languid feel to what goes on. There are some interludes with Plant singing ooh yeahs and pretty babies while Page bashes a wobbling solo out near the end, but this is all about a band of technical masters showing off how in tune they are with each other as well as how they have returned to a louder, forceful style.

‘Rock N Roll’ speeds proceedings up quite a few notches, a 12 bar blues progression sounding like they have gone back to the 50s and nuked the rock songs of those days.
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Format: Audio CD
I was in a real dilemma as to how to rate this. Five stars to the original album, and one star for the bonus disc, which as a package is blatant cash-in. It's about time Mr Page gave us some really worthwhile offerings, such as Earls Court '75 instead of these money making retreads.
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Format: Audio CD
This is one of those rare occasions when you are far better off getting this version than the so-called deluxe version, with a pointless second disc. The original album doesn't need anything else written about it. It's simply one of the greatest works in rock history, and you don't need a second disc you'll only ever play once.
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Format: Audio CD
This was a pioneering rock album by the band everyone aspired to be at the time, and are influenced by now. Unlike many other groundbreakers, this isn't particularly dated and still holds its own in a market that has moved on.

'Stairway to Heaven' deserves to be remembered as one of the all-time great tracks, but the others aren't fillers. More a case of 'Stairway' as the pinnacle of the album. Plant's vocals are forthright, bluesy and angst-ridden. Page's guitar lines are ideal in each situation and provide some great riffs. Bonham's drumming really is incredible rock drumming - hard, heavy, and not always as predicted. Somehow John-Paul Jones and his bass are by comparison, merely perfect.

There's a variety here - rocky numbers like 'Black Dog' and 'Rock n Roll', then slow blues like 'When the Levy Breaks'.

Since this album, the rock guitar has become louder and heavier through Motorhead, AC/DC, Anthrax, Slayer, through to the modern thrash. Despite that, this album still sounds fresh and has an edge of creative genius that many new bands just don't have as much of.

I write this not as someone who was there when it came out and is nostalgic (I'm too young!) but someone who found it after discovering the modern rock and metal world. And it's still, really, that good.
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