Buy Used
£1.77
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This item will be fulfilled same day by Amazon, is eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Delivery in the UK and 24/7 Customer Service. The book has been read but remains in clean condition. All pages are intact and the cover is intact although there may be some minor wear to the spine.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Learning to Fly Hardcover – 13 Sep 2001

4.2 out of 5 stars 81 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£3.56 £0.01
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Hardcover: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Michael Joseph Ltd; First Edition 12 Impression edition (13 Sept. 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0718144910
  • ISBN-13: 978-0718144913
  • Product Dimensions: 16 x 3.6 x 24.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (81 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 271,801 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Amazon Review

Learning to Fly is a rather apt title for Victoria Beckham's autobiography as she spreads her wings and embarks on a solo career without the safety net of the Spice Girls. The well-trodden story of the girl group takes up less time than you would expect in this book as Victoria uses it more as a platform to redress the balance of the rumours, gossip and allegations in the tabloid press. And boy, are there plenty of them to get her teeth stuck into. Victoria is open and honest throughout the book and comes across as a reasonably level-headed person and not simply a pouting clothes horse with a taste for designer labels. In fact, Victoria tries a little too hard to dismiss her glamorous image, thus destroying a little bit of the mystery that made her one of the two most talked-about Spice Girls (along with Geri). Unfortunately, for someone who condemns the press for the interest they show in every trivial detail of her life, she is more than happy to push those same trivialities here. So we have to wade through a lot of unimportant detail before we get to the meaty stuff, but there's plenty of that. The early days of the Spice Girls makes for interesting reading, particularly her catty comments towards the unseen sixth Spice Girl Michelle ("she had less rhythm than a cement mixer") and her first encounters with David Beckham are made all the more interesting in that we know what happened next. If there's one thing that comes over it's her love of her husband and her son, a love that was strengthened by the death threats and kidnap attempts. But the book really moves up a gear as Victoria slowly comes to realise someone very close to them has betrayed them and used his position within the Beckhams' inner circle to make a quick buck. That betrayal obviously hit home very hard and one can't help, perhaps for the first time, to understand some of the pressures she faces on a daily basis. There are plenty of lighter moments though, such as her brief romantic dalliance with 80s teen movie idol Corey Haim, which ended with her booting him out of her car. A glossy, fun and entertaining read, this book shows that while she may be Learning to Fly Victoria Beckham has her feet on the ground and the world at her feet. --Jonathan Weir

Review

Lips may curl derisively at this one, but canny booksellers will realise that it has almost as much potential as partner David Beckham's highly successful ego trip. And Posh Spice, after all, gives the faintest impression (unlike hubby) that she might once have opened a book. But words are not the issue here: like the David Beckham book, this is a feast of beguiling images of the sylph-like Spice Girl. In text that gives an impression of great frankness (suggesting she might even have had something to do with the writing of the book), Posh conveys what it's like to be half of the most famous couple in Britain, and talks about the vulnerability that has clearly never left her. There's also a welcome humour and self-mockery that surfaces at times, but the core audience for the book will be going for the 75 new photographs along with the occasional revelation. Posh is apparently undertaking a packed two-week promotional tour for the book.

See all Product Description

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
What kind of a reader am I? A well-educated older male who enjoys literary festivals; the Spice Girls' music does nothing for me and celebrity gossip bores me silly. So how on earth did I end up reading this book? Well, I was leafing through the second-hand books on a market stall when I came across it, and was curious to find out just what abject rubbish I might find between its covers... Amazingly, as soon as I started reading, I was gripped.
Having bought it, I quickly read it from start to finish. It is just so well written. And it really is disarmingly honest - I learned a lot about Victoria as a real human being, as well as about the anatomy of teenage angst, the workings of the music industry and the rarefied world of celebrity musicians and footballers.
Anyone who doesn't like the 'flash-forward' at the start can skip the first chapter; personally, the only chapter I didn't care for was the final one - too bland and gushy for me, and the only part of the book which seemed to be trying to manipulate the reader. Take out the first and the last chapters and you're left with 480 pages of fascinating reading!
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on 2 Jan. 2002
Format: Hardcover
This must be the most awful, boring book I have ever attempted to read! I am not a big fan, but thought it might be interesting to see what she has to say for herself, but after comments such as "there were no black people at my school - we were all nice little white kids", and "I was so ugly as a child I looked like one of those kids who get put up for adoption" I could not bothered to carry on. There is no flow in the context - it is all over the place, and it's 'David this' and 'David that' - hardly the story of her learning to fly. Sorry, but this gets a thumbs down!
Comment 42 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This is a glossy version of Queen Victoria's climb from playground outcast to celebrity pouter. Personally, I wasn't over keen on the thinly disguised smugness and her air of distaste towards anyone outside of her fragrant inner circle. The fact that Victoria claims that even her primary teachers and peers hated her has to say something about the persona beneath the gloss. Now...didn't I hear somewhere that Rebecca Loos is penning a tell all about her time as the Beckham's PA? Time to get those claws out again, Vic.
1 Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I like the spice girls and i didn't realise posh had an autobiography out. First of all it starts of boring about a typical child who wanted to be a popstar and did all the classes and got turned down on many auditions. same old same old. It gets juicer as the boom goes on. The parts to look out for is Mark her security guard (Keep Your Eye On Him) and the media who despise her for no reason. It is worth a read. So I advise you to buy it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
"Learning to fly" details the ups and downs of the tabloids favourite spice girl. What strikes you, as perhaps with all the spice girls is Victoria's honesty about her relationships, eating disorder and pressure of the media circus that follows her as a solo spice and as the wife of David Beckham. Fans will delight in the "gossip factor" of the book but partially interested readers will find the content heavy going...
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on 28 Sept. 2001
Format: Hardcover
The book is purely a platform for Mrs Beckham to voice her opinions and criticise others. I found it slow in parts and unflowing, repetious and not without typing mistakes. I assume these were because the book was rushed out to co-incide with the release of her solo single and her desire to go all out for publicity. Which brings me to her constant criticism of Geri Halliwell. I find it ironic that she blames Geri for her eating disorder as well as stating she has a problem with her ovaries and that she often discussed Geri's press attention as "ploys" for publicity for forthcoming singles etc and sets about explaining her own press attention as an intrusion. Now Mrs Beckham would never do that would she? I noticed she didn't bother to discuss David's driving ban, Brooklyn's "supposed" snatch outside Harrods and the fact that David got his licence back - conveniently. I would have thought this would have been an important issue to clear up, giving that she goes to such lenght to describe her feeling when she recieved kidnapp and death threats and how it affects her emotionally. But then again I guess when it never actually happened and she was caught out she didn't want to go there. So I guess leaving it out, speaks for itself. The extracts the papers published were by far the most interesting bits and I found the rest of it boring. However, what does come across in the book is how an unpopular girl who realised she wasn't the prettiest or most popular girl managed to rise to fame. I found that admirable and also it's a postivie message to most people. Also the relationship with her family especially her Mum who comes across in the book as a very special person. David comes across as a loving guy, but a bit too soft for his own good... I have to say I found it a bit stale and not a patch on Geri Halliwell's whose book was so well written, it just simply flowed. Sorry Victoria but I didn't enjoy it.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I do like a tale of "Ordinary Girl Makes Good", so I thought I'd give this a try. I was hoping for a heart-warming tale of struggles and successes that would give me a more informed opinion of Ms Beckham than that which I have gleaned from reading the papers.
Sadly what I got was a self-indulgent, boring and altogether too smug account of a privileged life. The writing wasn't great; the story was incoherent and jumped about all over the place, and I really didn't like the way she used the book as an opportunity to name-drop her celebrity friends and slate all those who have crossed her. I am still rather mystified as to just what Cliff Richard ever did to her.
Overall the book had a very self-satisfied tone that suggested Ms Beckham's opinion of herself far exceeds her talent. I'm giving it one star because the bit about Corey Haim was quite funny, but I wouldn't recommend buying the book on the strength of that.
Comment 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback