Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £5.46

Save £0.29 (5%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

The Law and the Lady (Oxford World's Classics) by [Collins, Wilkie]
Kindle App Ad

The Law and the Lady (Oxford World's Classics) Kindle Edition

2.3 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£5.46

Great Reads for 99p
Browse our selection of Kindle Books discounted to 99p each. Learn more
Get a £1 reward for movies or TV
Enjoy a £1.00 reward to spend on movies or TV on Amazon Video when you purchase any Amazon Kindle Book from the Kindle Store (excluding Kindle Unlimited, Periodicals and free Kindle Books) offered by Amazon.co.uk. A maximum of 1 reward per customer applies. UK customers only. Offer ends at 23:59 on Wednesday, September 27, 2017. Terms and conditions apply

Product description

About the Author

English novelist and playwright Wilkie Collins was a prolific writer with a body of work comprising thirty novels, over sixty short stories, more than a dozen plays, and a wide range of non-fiction pieces. Collins is best known for his novels The Woman in White, an early sensation novela genre combining shocking gothic horror with everyday domestic settingsand The Moonstone, which is credited as one of the first modern mystery novels. In the 1850s Collins met Charles Dickens and the two struck up a friendship, which lead to Collins becoming a frequent contributor to Dickens s journals Household Words and All the Year Round. Many of his stories have been adapted for film, including Basil, A Terribly Strange Bed, The Moonstone and The Woman in White. Collins died in 1889 at the age of 65.

Jenny Bourne Taylor is Reader in English at the University of Sussex.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1310 KB
  • Print Length: 463 pages
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford (4 Mar. 1999)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B006GODSQC
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 2.3 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #719,715 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  • Would you like to tell us about a lower price?


What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

Customer Reviews

2.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I really liked this story and then the disappoinment was that this particular edition stopped in the middle of a sentence half way through the bnook - so I have no idea what happens . I am currenlty reading the second half of the volume "I say No". My hope is that the other half of The Law and the Lady might be after I say No. There seem to be plenty of pages but some of the content has simply disappeared !
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Having never read any Wilkie Collins an avid WC fan advised me to start with this one... it's apparently based on a real case.

I loved this book and this started my WC phase. I have to say however that although this is shorter (if that's something that appeals) Man & Wife is an equally good if not better introduction to WC. Don't believe what people say abou the Moonstone being his best book!

Also, if you liked this, you'll also enjoy No Name - another fab one...!
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By C. C. Chivers VINE VOICE on 19 Aug. 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The whole story is very slow, very melodramatic and really quite laborious reading at times. The heroine is an extreme character, actually they all are and although I've not reached the end, it's pretty obvious what's going to happen.

I don't recommend this if you have read 'Woman in white' already, but if you like boring Dickensian novels that really drag, go for it.

I give it a 3 and not a 2 because at times it can be quite amusing and, after all, I did get beyond the halfway mark before I finally put it down.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I am a big fan of Wilkie Collin's work in general. He is certainly the premier writer of "suspense" novels in my opinion, and The Law and the Lady is another example of his usual type of fare. Valeria Woodville discovers her husband has been tried for the murder by poisoning of his first wife, was found "Not proven" in a Scottish court and sets out to prove his innocence of the charge and reassert her husband's good name. Being Collins, there are plenty of twists and turns along the way but it would be wrong to say this is his best work. If you are new to Collins, please start with The Woman in White or The Moonstone, then come to this novel later on as, though it is still an enjoyable read, those other books will show you what a fine writer Collins really was.

I am usually a big fan of Collins's villains as they are general brilliantly written and wonderfully charismatic, for example the wonderful Count Fosco in The Woman in White. I have to say though, I think he over did it a bit in the example in The Law and the Lady. Misserimus Dexter is a little too over the top for modern tastes particularly, given that one of the main features of him is a disfigurement/disability which it is fair to say would be handled much more sensitively by modern writers. The take on Dexter's descent into madness is also not the most politically correct and sensitively handled example you will ever come across. Whilst it is unfair on Collins to blame him for this, given that he is really only reflecting attitudes of the time he was writing, it does make for a little bit of uncomfortable reading now.
Read more ›
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
click to open popover