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Last Seen Wearing Audio Cassette – Audiobook, 21 Sep 2001

4.0 out of 5 stars 36 customer reviews

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Audio Cassette, Audiobook, 21 Sep 2001
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Product details

  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: Macmillan Audio Books (21 Sept. 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0333906640
  • ISBN-13: 978-0333906644
  • Product Dimensions: 10.7 x 1.7 x 13.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,834,942 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

'Morse was beset by a nagging feeling. Most of his fanciful notions about the Taylor girl had evaporated and he had begun to suspect that further investigation into Valerie's disappearance would involve little more than sober and tedious routine.'

Book Description

‘Morse was beset by a nagging feeling. Most of his fanciful notions about the Taylor girl had evaporated and he had begun to suspect that further investigation into Valerie’s disappearance would involve little more than sober and tedious routine.’ --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Another good read from Colin Dexter. I really enjoyed LAST SEEN WEARING. The missing girl in the shape of the character Valerie Taylor had been missing for two years, three months and two days and had gone missing on her way back to school.

I liked the rapport between Morse and Lewis (Lewis in my mind as I read the book) had really got more confidence when talking to Morse and even when Lewis had to go to bed with the flu, he really thought about the case and gave Morse plenty to think about when he visited him.

I don't want to spoil it for readers who haven't read the book but what I can tell you is that the characters Baines and Phillipson were very dark and Colin Dexter invented twists and turns that were very surprising. This is what made the novel interesting for me to read and I was surprised by Mrs.Taylor's actions (Valerie's mother) and the big surprise was at the end but you'll have to read the book as I don't want to spoil it for anybody.

Congratulations to Pan (Colin Dexter's publishers) for the great covers) and to Colin himself for penning another great novel. Well done!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Although I have all of the Morse dvds and my wife and I have watched them a number of times, I have never read any of the books, so this is the first one. After two hours more or less continuously reading, I find it well written and very much a 'page turner'. I still have over half to finiish and have now ordered 'Last bus to Woodstock' from the same supplier, Sten Books, both brand new books.
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Format: Kindle Edition
There are two elements that raise Last Seen Wearing above usual police procedural fare. The first is the plotting and the second the characterization. Dexter maps out a wonderfully constructed story of feints and blind alleys as Morse stumbles from one line of reasoning to another, his theories constantly dashed on the rocks of empirical evidence. Every time it appears he has found a path forward, it turns into a cul-de-sac. This is not a tale of a genius cop who always finds his quarry, but is rather more Clouseau in his bumbling, much to Lewis' delight. Morse and Lewis are both well drawn, somewhat complex and paradoxical characters. Morse, for example, is both cultured and coarse, buying the Sunday Times and the News of the World as his Sunday papers and dragging Lewis into a strip club on a visit to London. The support cast of suspects were also nicely realised. As always, Oxford and its surrounds provide a scenic backdrop. Overall, a very enjoyable read.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The second Morse story by the master crime writer Colin Dexter. A growing maturity in the plot and leading characters is clearly evident as the doleful detective continues his search for fullfillment.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Excellent first book in the series of Morse. Have read other Colin Dexter novels and find he has the ability to develop characters at the beginning of the first chapter. Now intend to read on following characters from this novel.
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Format: Paperback
This book is another entry in Colin Dexter’s Inspector Morse series, and here we get to watch as the detective is assigned to a cold case. But maybe the case isn’t that cold, because some new evidence is discovered and he’s given a lead to follow up on.

But with no body, it’s difficult to prove that a murder has even occurred. It’s a tangled web of intrigue that we’re looking at here, and we get to see it through his eyes – of course, Lewis comes into it as well, and he actually provides some useful insights, although it’s ultimately Morse who does most of the investigation. But will he find the answer out too late?

One of the things that I liked about this book was that Dexter did a great job of introducing you to his world – Morse works in and around Oxford, which isn’t far from me, and I even spotted a reference to High Wycombe, which is where I live. Because of that, it makes the story somehow more enjoyable, at least for me. The characters also feel real, and even though it’s set very much amongst the generation before mine, they were also easy to relate to, in some ways.

And of course, there’s the fact that it’s easy to read this, and the pages just whizz past. I read the whole book across the space of a couple of days, and there was never a dull moment – even the initial build-up wasn’t as slow as it was in some of the other Morse books, and I felt like the motives were well-thought out and realistic, and introduced slowly, more like a dawning epiphany than a sudden slap in the face.

Overall then, I enjoyed this as much as – if not more than – the other Morse books that I’ve read, and it definitely left me wanting to read the rest of the books in the series. It’s not a bad place to start if you’re new to Dexter’s work. So go ahead – enjoy it!
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Format: Paperback
This is only the second of the Inspector Morse series, but is one of the very best of the thirteen books. Rarely has Dexter managed better characterization and the plotting is complex in the extreme.

The plot involves the disappearance of Valerie Taylor, a teenage schoolgirl on her way back from lunching at home. This occurred over two years ago and she has not been since since. The investigating officer continued to work on the case informally but is then killed in a motor accident. Shortly thereafter, a letter purporting to come from Valerie is received by her parents, and Morse and Lewis are asked to continue the investigation.

Morse initially has little or no interest in a mere missing person case and much of the dog work falls on Lewis. Only when he is confined to bed does the Chief Inspector take up the reins himself. This section of the story is fascinating as it allows Lewis to gain a much truer perspective of Morse’s strengths and weaknesses, after which he accepts the latter because of the depth and unconventionality of the former. From the beginning Morse is adamant that Valerie is dead and acts on that assumption. This dead or alive theme runs through the story and allows Dexter to confuse the reader with a number of red herrings and apparent dead ends. In time a corpse does appear, but it is older, and male.

The central characteristic of Morse is developed to the full; his constant formulation of more-or-less convincing theories, each of which is demolished when further evidence emerges or when Lewis points out inherent inconsistences, an action that causes friction between the two men. Dead ends stop further plot deveIopment, only for Morse to discover an alternative avenue leading to another major theory.
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