Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £2.99

Save £8.00 (73%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

The Last Man on Earth Club by [Hardy, Paul R.]
Kindle App Ad

The Last Man on Earth Club Kindle Edition

4.6 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£2.99

Length: 432 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

Kindle Books from 99p
Load up your Kindle library before your next holiday -- browse over 500 Kindle Books on sale from 99p until 31 August, 2016. Shop now

Product Description

About the Author

Paul R. Hardy started life as a filmmaker. He made eighteen short films, won a BBC Drama Award, co-wrote & co-produced an independent SF film called Triple Hit and also wrote Filming on a Microbudget, a guidebook for making short films. Having been introduced to the concept of spare time following a well-known global financial meltdown, he now writes science fiction novels as well. The Last Man on Earth Club was published in 2011, to be followed by All That I See or Seem in 2012. Paul can usually be found in his native England (what with the cost of travel these days). Every now and again, he writes interesting things in his blog: lastmanonblog.blogspot.com

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 5197 KB
  • Print Length: 432 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00520977U
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #200,763 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
One word for this book... "brilliant". Okay. there's a few others I could use but I don't want to labor the point. Although I read a lot of books across a wide range of genres, a story about people going through therapy is not a subject matter that would normally appeal, yet from the moment I started reading this book I wasn't able to put to down. It goes some way to answering the question we all ask ourselves at the end of the disaster movie... "so what did happen to the last man on Earth?"

I was intrigued by the title at first which for some reason made me think 50's pulp sci-fi (no idea why, it just did) then the blurb struck me as a rather unique concept and one that I certainly hadn't encountered before, it whetted my curiosity just enough to buy it. I must admit, at this point I still didn't think it was going to be my kind of thing and as apparently it's a first novel by a new author I did have some reservations.

To find that not only is it well written and articulate came as a pleasant surprise but the way the author "drip-feeds" each characters story to the reader is brilliantly and tortuously done. The characters are unique to the story yet all have something "familiar" about them if you've read or watched enough "end-of-the-world" scenarios. I was wracking my brains trying to spot the inspiration for each one and I think I got a couple.

There are some nice little quirks in the science too (easier to explore parallel dimensions than to travel to the stars) and a nice little insight into the politics of the parallel universe in which these survivors find themselves. Being able to hop dimensions at will doesn't apparently get you around basic economics or instantly make you a race of enlightened beings acting out of pure altruism.
Read more ›
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Inter-stellar travel is a bust. The stars are just too far away. How much easier to slip sideways and visit other Earths, infinitely duplicated through a chain of alternate universes.

This is the premise behind Paul Hardy's highly original novel The Last Man on Earth Club. Exploration teams fan out from the world they call The Hub to visit its doppelgängers. All too often they find disaster: war, genocide and natural cataclysm. The Hub becomes a magnet for refugees and survivors. Among them are six unique individuals, the last members of their respective races. They are gathered together to undergo therapy.

One of the things that makes this book so readable is its clinical approach. It begins as a collection of documents: reports from contact teams and transcripts of individual and group therapy sessions in which the six - all in their different ways severely damaged - introduce themselves and their home worlds. Gradually these merge into a first person account by the therapist (herself a refugee from an Earth that sounds uncomfortably like our own). There are plenty of dramatic twists and revelations, but the measured tone of her voice holds all the threads together.

Hardy has obviously researched his subject (in a note at the end of the book he recommends several works on post-traumatic stress disorder and "post-disaster psychological aftercare") but he carries his studies lightly and there is no sense of undigested theory. On the contrary, the characters are marvellously strong and varied, as are the layers of guilt they conceal.

He has put together a cocktail of sf scenarios which genre fans will love: nuclear devastation, environmental collapse, AI wars, genetic manipulation, plagues of zombies, the lot.
Read more ›
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I really enjoyed reading this book. The characters were brilliant and they all get their fair share of coverage. All the characters are distinctly different and all have interesting backgrounds. I had a great time getting to know each one of them and learning about them.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
This is not a comedy. It's a story about apocalypse survivors who are rescued from their parallel Earth's and brought to a safe uninhabited version of Earth where they might heal. They are placed in a facility where they work through therapy, group activities, that sort of thing. The survivors' stories unfold through their interactions with each other, punctuated by some flashbacks and factual documents such as case reports, planetary surveys and so forth. A big fan of sci-fi, I was a bit worried the story would be repetitive or mushy, but neither turned out to be the case. Instead I found myself thinking about the characters which are well-drawn (though predictably all from very different backgrounds). Indeed, towards the middle I was worried the individual stories were simply running their course, when the story took an unexpected turn with planetary politics and other interesting consequences of the many Earth's idea. Sharp, funny in places, a good read. If happy reading and/or endings are your thing, this might not be for you.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
An original premise, sure; a group of survivors, each the last member of humanity in their own universe's version of Earth, gather together in a refuge on a 'safe' Earth and undergo group therapy. I was quickly hooked, but after a while something started to bother me about it. Then I put my finger on it. All the female characters are damaged but strong. The male characters, on the other hand... deluded, corrupt, amoral; there's a possible rapist, a homophobe who just might be suppressing the fact that he's gay, and a condescending religious nut who is bound to get his comeuppance.

The more I read, the more it seemed like some sort of Guardian columnist's fantasy. Regardless of where you stand on some of the issues covered (imperialism, religion, race, gender relations), it is no fun to be lectured at by someone with nothing new to say, whether you agree in principle or not. Seems like an opportunity wasted by a too much subtle-as-a-brick polemicising.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

click to open popover