Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £1.29

Save £7.70 (86%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

From Last to First: How I Became a Marathon Champion by [Spedding, Charlie]
Kindle App Ad

From Last to First: How I Became a Marathon Champion Kindle Edition

4.5 out of 5 stars 89 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£1.29

Length: 236 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

Kindle Books from 99p
Load up your Kindle library before your next holiday -- browse over 500 Kindle Books on sale from 99p until 31 August, 2016. Shop now

Product Description

Review

‘It’s a pleasure to accompany him on that journey’

(Independent on Sunday)

‘Inspirational story’

(Athletics Weekly)

‘Honest, frank and inspirational’

(The Journal (Newcastle))

Review

'It's a pleasure to accompany him on that journey' Independent on Sunday 20110327 'Inspirational story' Athletics Weekly 20110609 'Honest, frank and inspirational' The Journal (Newcastle) 20110312

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 726 KB
  • Print Length: 236 pages
  • Publisher: Aurum Press (1 Jun. 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1845136896
  • ISBN-13: 978-1845136895
  • ASIN: B0077FAWP4
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 89 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #19,115 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
And did you ever do some training to try and be a better runner? Maybe tried a Marathon once or twice?
You should read this to get an idea of what it takes to be a world class runner.
I'm pretty sure Charlie had more natural talent for running than he admits in the book - but he's still pretty convincing that the right approach and a deal of hard work can get you a long way. Like winning the London Marathon and taking a medal at the Olympics.

Still the fastest ever Englishman at the distance.
"Remarkable!", as David Coleman might have put it.
Comment 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I can't recommend this book highly enough to anyone who has wondered what their potential as a runner might be. I used to spend a lot of time concentrating on the training schedules, shoes, energy gels etc without ever working out the 'why am I doing this?'.

Charlie's story is exceptional as he truly gets to the heart of what it takes to give a great performance, all set against the background of his own career and Olympic success. It also contains some excellent descriptions of what racing at the sharp end is like.

I've been been running for nearly 20years but never that quickly. After reading Charlie's book I decided that I was going to run the race of my life at the Reading Half Marathon this year and, following his example from the book, I didn't know how good that could be. Concentrating on the why allowed me be to beat my previous best ( 1.38 at the Great North Run when I was 27). After six months of focussed training I did 1.24.52 at 42 years old @ Reading HM.

A great story and insight into getting the best out of yourself.
2 Comments 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have wanted to read this book since I saw a review in a sports magazine about 2 years ago. I really enjoyed this book, it was a honest account of his career and a account of how hard work and positive thinking can make the most of natural talent. The book was so good I read it in a day
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Love this book. Charlie Spedding is Britain's only Olympic marathon medal winner (might revisit this review after 2020, depending on how Mo Farah shapes up) and Last to First tells us how he did it.

Quick answer: a little bit of talent (although not *that* much, he seems to make us want to believe), a lot of dedication and a frame of mind that allowed him to peak for just the right occasions. Never the fastest, he nevertheless managed to win the London marathon in 1984, get a bronze in the Los Angeles Olympic marathon, and hold the fastest English marathon time for an unlikely 29 years.

Very well written and easy to follow, the book takes us through his career and training, how he got himself "up" for the biggest races, and leaves the reader with a pleasant understanding of his humility and modesty. My left Achilles tendon has been hurting for the last six months and it's interesting to read how he was able to overcome injuries and setbacks from the beginning to the end of his running years. I found the way he was able to change the way he thought about himself (an epiphany in a pub) inspirational and it's given me hope of one day getting a sub-three hour marathon. Thanks, fella!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
An extremely enjoyable read from beginning to end.

I have read dozens of books on athletics over the last 45 years and this is one of the very best.

Charlie clearly sets out the reasons how he managed to achieve great success even though (as he would be the first to admit) he was not the most naturally gifted of athletes.

His Olympic marathon run and London Marathon were two of the gutsiest performances I have ever seen and it was great to relive these races in his excellently written book.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Unless you followed athletics keenly in the 1980's Charlie Spedding won't be a familiar name. As a mid pack marathon runner I was keen to know more about him.

This is the first time I had read an autobiography by an Elite athlete. Strangely the book starts with the highlight of his career, the 1984 Oylmpic marathon. This is very strange as the vast majority of autobiographies start with childhood and take it from there. I have no idea why this is not the case here. It could be that the publishers think that if kindle readers download the start of the book, they'll be hooked and want to buy it.

Chapter two deals with his childhood and how he progresses through the ranks. The title of the book although true is not accurate, he came last in a 100 yard sprint as a small child racing against older children. An Olympic 100 metre runner would come last if he as a small child raced 400 meters against older children.

The story takes us on a journey as a successful track runner and then the switch to marathon distance and builds to the 1984 Olympic marathon, then if you want to read how that race went you have to start back at Chapter 1 again. Which is frustrating.

Through one thing or another success and winning races didn't happen much after the games in L.A.

The last chapter of the book reads a bit like a blog or a magazine article and is more of a rant and rave and talks about everything from the Maradona hand of God to childhood obesity in the UK. As a former Elite distance runner he is naturally very disappointed and disillusioned at the lack of talent in GB Athletics.
Read more ›
2 Comments 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

click to open popover