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The Last Dragon: Twilight of the Celts Book I Paperback – 19 Jun 2014

4.2 out of 5 stars 30 customer reviews

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  • The Last Dragon: Twilight of the Celts Book I
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  • The Storm Lord: Twilight of the Celts Book II
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Product details

  • Paperback: 592 pages
  • Publisher: Headline Review (19 Jun. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0755379578
  • ISBN-13: 978-0755379576
  • Product Dimensions: 13.2 x 3.9 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 447,230 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Hume brings the bloody, violent, conniving world vividly to life...will appeal to those who thrill to Game of Thrones and other tales of intersecting, ever-warring, noble lineages (Kirkus Review)

Hume deftly navigates the Arthurian legends, populating them with likable and despicable characters, and casting them in a fully realized historical setting (Publishers Weekly)

Historical fiction of the most bloodthirsty and roistering kind (Australian Bookseller & Publishers Magazine)

Exciting, violent and bloody... Up there with Conn Iggulden and Bernard Cornwell (www.lovereading.co.uk)

It's a slice of history that's totally, utterly believable. Magnificent (www.booksmonthly.co.uk)

Book Description

The legend of King Arthur lives on in this epic and dramatic new trilogy from the magnificent storyteller M. K. Hume. Sure to appeal to fans of Game of Thrones.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a hurredly put together series on the back of all other authors work in this genre. Piecemeal and drab, it really should be left alone. The paperback costs over£10 and my advice would be, if you are going to read it that is, get it froma library and it'll cost you nothing.
the first book was readable but it all went drastically wrong thereafter.At least messrs Cornwell, Iggulden and Tolkein did their research. This author has just patched things together regardless of their chronology and veracity.
Total rubbish !
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Love these books.Have read the Merlin Trilogy they were fantastic and a new slant on a beliveable Merlin. As were the Artor Trilogy.I really like this author and look forward to reading a lot more of her books.
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Format: Paperback
King Arthur. How many ways can his story be retold and the myths surrounding him be re-invented? Apparently endlessly, as The Last Dragon is yet another Arthur retelling with a twist. Admittedly, M.K. Hume's version of the story is an Interesting one, with the myth retold in a novel way. In fact, the Arthur who becomes known as the Last Dragon is the mythical Arthur's illegitimate son and the series Twilight of the Celts, of which this novel is the first instalment, is set after King Arthur's demise. The series is a continuation of two prior trilogies covering the lives of Merlin and King Arthur. I've not read these previous series and while I don't know how the Matter of Britain has been covered there, familiarity with the original stories and their themes allowed me to find my way in this somewhat uncannily familiar-yet-different version of Arthur's world.

What becomes clear from reading The Last Dragon is the affection in which Hume holds the Arthurian mythos and how well she knows it. She structures her version of Arthur's story in a triad of Arthurs, echoing a traditional Welsh telling of the tale which features three Gweneveres. Here we have three Arthurs: Artor or Artorex, Ector, and Arthur. The regular mythos has been broken up among them. Artorex is the version of Arthur that has the most traditional elements attached, but is also based on the more `historical' view of Arthur as a Romano-Briton Dux Bellorum against the Anglo-Saxons, while Ector is the more politically savvy, yet kind-hearted version, and Arthur, our current hero, is the one raised in obscurity and ignorant of his heritage, yet he has inherited this sword. I thought this structuring a nice shift and it was interesting to see how Hume moulded the Matter to her tale.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book is a bit disappointing. Some of the descriptions of place and action are great but, oh dear, the dialogue! People do not speak like this. I don't believe Celts spoke like this. I was looking forward to a series of books but this is not an investment I'll be making. Sorry.
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Format: Paperback
This volume is centred on the last years of Roman Britain and, in particular, on the usurpation of Constantinus and his invasion of Gaul at the head of most that was left of the Roman forces in Britain.

I rather liked the choice of topic, even if it is not exactly an original one. I also liked a few of the fictional features introduced, such as having one Lady Severa, the daughter of the previous usurper (Magnus Maximus) getting married to Constantinus. However, I did have two main sets of problems with this book.

There were simply too many fictional elements for this book to be deemed a historical novel set in the beginning of the Fifth century. It is somewhat unlikely that the so-called “Britons” had a common identity after being part of the Roman Empire for over three hundred and fifty years. It is also unlikely that they were still ruled by semi-independent tribal “kings” with their own warriors alongside a Roman administration and army.

Also non-historical is the opposition between Roman aristocrats and senators sent out from Rome, trusting all the high military commands and looking down on everyone else. This had been the situation up to the third century, because was not the case anymore some two hundred years later when all officers had become professionals. Another feature is that the legionaries by the time the events in this book take place were mostly recruited locally; they were largely Romano-Britons, as opposed to Romans from Rome. The ethnic origins of both the legions and the auxiliaries would probably also be mainly local, although they could also include “barbarian” volunteers and perhaps also descendants of federates, such as Sarmatians or Tungrians for instance.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I've read every single book in M.K Hume's Dragon King series to date and sadly, I feel like each subsequent book is slightly...less good than the previous.

I'm also increasingly getting frustrated because I think the author has fallen so in love with the main characters that she's taken to justifying every single one of their actions in the book to the point where it feels like she is trying to micro manage our view of the main characters. She doesn't need to do this because the characters are all really well developed to the point that we can understand their motivations and reasons without having to be reminded that they are good guys.

Anyway that's my only criticism...I've thoroughly enjoyed the series and it's inspired me to get out into the local countryside and visit some old Roman villas, Stone Henge, Glastonbury and other towns mentioned in the book!
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