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The Last Colony Paperback – 5 Sep 2008

4.3 out of 5 stars 53 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Tor; Reprints edition (5 Sept. 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0330457128
  • ISBN-13: 978-0330457125
  • Product Dimensions: 11.1 x 2.1 x 17.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (53 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 624,100 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Review

'it gladdens the reader's heart. A good old-fashioned future, and great fun' -- Daily Telegraph

Book Description

Third novel in an outstanding new series of SF adventure, which has won worldwide acclaim

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Mark Chisholm TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 17 Nov. 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
What a refreshing change to the usual never ending repetitive series that often start off well, but drag on too long trying to squeeze the last penny out of the reader's pocket. Nope John Scalzi has resisted the tempation and the three book series is all the better for it. Together they make up a proper begining, middle and end, each being self contained but with of course the previous book to build on.

The Last Colony is less violent and much less of a "space opera", than the Old Man's War and in particular Chost Brigades. It is however well written and with enough action to keep most happy. There are some good plot twists and a bit of ambiguity when it comes to in book political manouvering. It makes for an intelligent but not demanding read.

The book is also short and snappy. Whilst like many I rather enjoy the Peter F Hamilton door stops it's also refreshing to read a book that will actually fit in a small bag. You could concievably put all three books into a one book tomb although each book to be fair does have it's own individual flavour.

Overall I'd recommend this to sci-fi fans who enjoyed the EE Doc Smith books in their childhood but now read the Hamilton mammoth titles and who are game for a short, thoughtful and interesting series.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very good
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Another one of Scalzi's books I could not put down! Great story with an unexpected twist at the end !
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Format: Paperback
The third story in the 'Old Man's War' series by John Scalzi continues the tale of the life of John Perry, an elderly man who left Earth to join humanity's colonial defence force and regain his youth. Now retired, he finds himself offered an opportunity he can't refuse - to start a completely new colony.

Once again it's a fantastic story filled with a rich volume of intrigue, comedy and drama - while a complex plot it's really approachable and manages to avoid the pitfalls that many science fiction stories seem to suffer, such as being unintelligible or dull. The pacing is spot on and the action flows in an episodic manner that still feels naturally continuous.

Despite the time that's passed since I read the first two books, and my memories off then being somewhat hazy, the narrative provides just the right amount of setup to get me back into the world without me feeling overly burdened by recaps and I'm sure this would provide an easy starting point for a new reader to the series.

I love the characters and the humour that Scalzi creates and reading this was another great experience. I'll definitely be looking out for the later books in the series and hope that they continue to be as great.
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Format: Paperback
You know what you get with John Scalzi - a competently written story that is purely plot-driven. He isn't a fancy writer, in fact I think in the whole of the book there are only a handful of purely descriptive passages. By the end you'll have a unique opinion of what the main characters look like because very little is on the page. That's not necessarily a bad thing.

Where Scalzi is strong is in his grasp of technology, which he slots into the story with an assured hand, and his dialogue which is snappy and charmingly retro.

But when the technology is pulled out of a hat at just the right moment to handle a specific situation, which is glaringly convenient in the first place, it takes the lustre off.

And the dialogue that served as a background to the first two books in the trilogy now makes up the bulk of the novel. There is an awful lot of extended discussion going on and unfortunately a lot of it sounds like the same character arguing with himself. Only the clearly alien Obin has a distinctive voice, though even that voice is just a cagier version of the "regular" speech. Even the main "alien" characters all sound like humans from the fifties. Scalzi isn't even THAT old.

Literally, several times during the novel, a group of characters will discuss some point or other, arguing themselves in circles all using similar idiom and all behaving rationally and even-tempered. Mostly.

All except Jane the female protagonist and wife to the narrator. She gets to be the savage, rage barely-contained character whose handling of the situation we'd probably rather be reading if she was given her wishes, while her old fogey (admittedly in a spanking new body) husband fumes about the indignities being heaped on him.
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Format: Paperback
The Conclave, a collective of over 400 alien species, has declared any attempts at colonisation by non-conclave members on any planet will be met with the removal of the colony. The CDF, not a member of the conclave, plans to make a mockery of the conclave by setting up a new colony and leaking false information about its whereabouts.

To run this colony a family is chosen, one with a history and capabilities that can help it succeed. John Perry, a CDF veteran with a decorated history; Jane Sagan, a former CDF special forces intelligence officer with knowledge usually reserved for the highest ranking CDF officers; and Zoe Boutin, daughter to the traitor Charles Boutin and now worshipped by the Obin for her fathers work in bringing them consciousness.

But the colony is not told of its secret until they arrive at the planet and find themselves unable to use technology for fear of bringing the conclave to them. Will the colony survive and, more importantly for the CDF, will their plan to break the conclave work?

We once again return to the Old Man's War universe, this time with familiar characters from both the previous novels. John and Jane are already well flushed out characters, but put in a new situation it gives a new light to them. We've seen them in the Colonial Defense Force but now we get treated to normal family life, at least for a while, before they're thrown into the situation of being cut off from civilisation.

The rest of the characters, ranging from politicians to farmers and all in between, are nicely flushed out. The motivations and ideals they hold are well defined and interesting to see mixed together.
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