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Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder Paperback – 17 Mar 2006

4.5 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 335 pages
  • Publisher: Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill (17 Mar. 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1565125223
  • ISBN-13: 978-1565125223
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 2.5 x 21.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 141,668 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
It's a sad truth that the perople who really need to read this long-overdue book are the ones who never will. If you're reading this then, yes, this book does just wehat it ssays on the tin. Buy it!
This book covers so many things that concern society but which are ignored as, simply, there's no 'market' for this. Why are so many things in society getting worse? Why are people so damn miserable when they have so much better health, food and entertainment than their ancestors? Because there's something very simple and basic missing.
One thing to point out about this book is that it is NOT (To quote South Park) 'A load of Tree Hugging Hippie Cr*p' and it's not trying to 'Turn the clock back' or 'Deny progres'. It's a calmly assessed, properly researched book which points out what's increasingly missing in the lives of kids - and thus people -all over the globe.
Unlike our generation (By which, I mean, anyone old enough to be reading this review), todays kids of the Supermarket and Play Area never experience any kind of freedom in anything like 'nature'. They'll have been on trips to zoos and swimming pools, taken to other countries and seen more nature videos than we ever did, and they'll have had the whole gamut of ecological information rammed down their throats as something sad, responsible and Important, but the world of 'Nature' is merely academic knowledge, not a personal experience. They've never run randomly in a wood, climbing any tree they feel like, never laid in a bunch of grass staring at clouds or trying to catch crickets. They won't have just walked along an overgrown path, wacking stinging nettles with a stick. They'll have missed out on the value of mucking about with nature - that it doesn't include Words.
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Format: Paperback
This book is a good look into what is happening to children today. It claims that a lack of contact with nature and/or a lack of free play in an unsupervised place is causing problems both for the way people view the environment (as people with little/no knowledge of it) and for people too (he suggests links with ADHD).

It is however written by an American for Amercians, and most of the content is focused on US examples, this is not inherantly a bad thing just a little annoying as someone in the UK. It also has a short preachy Christian chapter in it; which you may like, but as an atheist I thought was unnecessary.

The author is at pains to point out that Nature-Deficit Disorder isn't a recognised medical condition, but that it is a way to look at the problems and way to find potential soluntions arsing from TV/computer based play.

Perhaps 3 stars is a little harsh, as it is easy to read, and well thought through. It just seems to be resting on one person's interpretation and not factual enough. I guess if you have kids it will appeal/connect to you more than it did to me.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The book arrived from the seller quickly and in very good condition.
It took me a while to get into the book. I'm half way through reading it. It seems like it mostly a reflexion and memories of what a natural outdoors child hood used to be and what children are missing out on today. There is some link to philosophies and theories. So far it's ok, but I hope the rest of the book has more thoughts towards solutions and ideas to engage children in getting outdoors.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Probably the most important conservation book of our time. Brilliantly well written and simply essential reading fr anyone that wants to understand one of the most important challenges being faced by our world
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