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Larry Burrows: Vietnam Hardcover – 1 Oct 2002

4.6 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

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Hardcover, 1 Oct 2002
£44.23
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 244 pages
  • Publisher: Knopf Publishing Group; 1 edition (Oct. 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 037541102X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0375411021
  • Product Dimensions: 24.7 x 2.7 x 31.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 75,075 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Henry Frank Leslie Burrows, aka Larry Burrows, is Number 1 in my top three favourite photographers from the Vietnam War era.
This book is filled with Larry's photographs, including the set from 'One Ride With Yankee Papa 13', which shows his artistic skills in composing a photograph which some people would find hard, if not impossible, to do during peace-time let alone in a war zone.
Well worth the money and a book I will delve into time and time again.
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Format: Hardcover
Larry Burrows is an interesting figure in photographic history. His death in a helicopter crash near the Laotian border in 1971 marked the end of a notable career and coincided with the end of the era of mass communication in which photojournalism was the primary medium, it's role having been largely taken over by television. Burrows was perhaps the last old school war photographer, as epitomised by Robert Capa, whose negatives of the D-Day landings he once accidently ruined as a young lab technician. Fellow professionals were amazed by his fastidiousness over his standard of dress and personal hygiene as well as his methodical approach to his work. Like Capa, Burrows would go to almost any lengths to get his pictures, even taking to the air as a passenger in combat aircraft to photograph the results of air strikes.
Burrows's photographs of wounded American soldiers and Vietnamese civilians are technically excellent and for the most part, perfectly composed in classical proportions, like still life paintings or scenic postcards. It's interesting to compare his work with that of Tim Page. Page's approach was much more personalised, and he used Nikon SLR cameras which enabled him to use a wider range of lens focal lengths, whereas Burrows used the more traditional Leica M series rangefinders.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I never get tired of looking at some of these images - they are stunning. This is a worthwhile addition to any collection of art, photography or history books. It perfectly captures both Burrows' time in Vietnam and the reality of the war for the soldiers present.
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Format: Hardcover
Firstly, I'd like to make it clear that I do not own this book; I chose to rate it a 5 only under duress from Amazon. Rather, I have seen many of the stark and harrowing images that feature in this publication at the War Remnants exhibit in Saigon (Ho Chi Minh City), Vietnam. In many ways the first technicolour war, the US-Vietnam conflict was reported by a free western press as no other before it (and given the freedom-curbing measures of the US military and US media's compliance during the Iraq invasion, perhaps since too). However, it was not the pen that proved to be mightier than the sword (or the machine gun), but rather the still image. Larry Burrows did not live to see the end of the Vietnam war his lenses almost came to define; he was killed in a helicopter crash in 1971 while on assignment for LIFE magazine along with another photographer whose work is of comparable quality, Henri Huet. Burrows' technically-brilliant images of the conflict are arguably definitive - and are certainly among the most memorable of this tragic chapter of 20th century history. For saddening, unforgettable glimpses of what was life - and death - for the poor individuals caught up in it, look no further.
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