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Language Death Hardcover – 26 Jun 2000

4.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Hardcover, 26 Jun 2000
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 1st edition (26 Jun. 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0521653215
  • ISBN-13: 978-0521653213
  • Product Dimensions: 13.8 x 2 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,372,516 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product description

Review

'… this work is directed at anyone with an interest in humanities and a concern about our future as mankind. Its wealth of information, observation and analysis enlightens the mind and invigorates the spirit of community and identity.' Language International'

'This is the most personal and passionate of the many excellent books that Crystal has written in the past two decades.' The Times Higher Education Supplement

'David Crystal [is] the most charismatic lexicographer since Dr Johnson.' Boyd Tonkin, Independent

'A serious study of why so many languages across the world are dying.' Hasan Suroor, The Hindu

Professor David Crystal, a linguistics expert, whose book Language Death examines the prospects for 3,000 endangered languages.' in an article on Celtic languages.' Independent on Sunday

'Fascinating to the specialist and non-specialist alike, this is an important book which puts across its point in clear accessible prose.' Contemporary Review

'… inspiring by its inexhaustible optimism and its firm belief that something can and should be done …'. Asian and African Studies

'Thanks to his skilful deployment of statistics, his book brings out starkly the scale of language loss that we are currently experiencing …'. The Linguist

Book Description

The endangerment and death of minority languages across the world is a matter of widespread concern. A leading commentator on language issues, David Crystal asks the question, 'Why is language death so important?', reviews the reasons for the current crisis, and investigates what is being done to reduce its impact.

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This slim book is perhaps the best one in which to start reading about the danger of massive extinction of languages in our world.
The author, who claims to care much about this worrying issue despite admittedly never having spent longer periods in any endangered language environment, does a pretty good job systematically examining the causes of language death and what could be done to halt the process. He not only points out the fact that often communities themselves are to blame for not doing enough to pass on their native tongues to the following generation, but also examines what may have lead them to do so.
One shortcoming of the book is that very few actual "real-life" cases are mentioned to illustrate his points and breathe life into the subject, and those few cases that are mentioned only get a few lines - this leaves the text somewhat dry and academic.
He has also devoted one chapter to "Why should we care?", and as usual in books about this issue, that is where his writing is weakest. I found his arguments rather unconvincing, but also unnecessary - I personally don't feel the need to have practical arguments to care about preserving languages, which I think should be considered valuable in their own right.
A valuable extra in the book is the appendix listing organizations devoted to the preservation of endangered languages worldwide.
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Format: Paperback
Having an interest in lesser used languages and a high regard for the author (acclaimed linguist, David Crystal) I purchased this book. I just could not put it down, until I had read from cover to cover. The most compelling, stimulating, enlightening and thought provoking language book I have ever picked up. Definately not one to pass by. I give this book my highest reccomendation.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I made a perfect deal for very little money ,all went as promised
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.4 out of 5 stars 8 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Starts slow, but rewarding in the end 6 Nov. 2007
By James Huffman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
'Language Death' does a hard job well. The author seeks to show both the need for language preservation, and at the same time provides an overview of the process by which language preservation can be done.

The book started slowly for me: the first section is an argument in favor of language preservation, and a discussion of language death, and I found the arguments in favor of preservation to be a bit long and over-drawn. But then, I didn't need to be persuaded; I think language diversity is a good thing, and those not yet so convinced may need more work. But the book is overall well-done, well-written, and concise, and entertaining and thought-provoking as well.

An earlier reviewer (who's also a buddy of mine) suggested that the book gives insufficient credit to Bible translators in the job of language preservation. I'd suggest that Crystal may have a slight bias against Bible translators, especially when he refers to the work done by Bible translators as being biased. I might prefer describing it as narrowly-drawn, rather than biased.

But having said all this, the book handles a tough task in a easy to read manner, and gives a good introduction.
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Good Introduction 17 Oct. 2004
By Laszlo Wagner - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This slim book is perhaps the best one in which to start reading about the danger of massive extinction of languages in our world.

The author, who claims to care much about this worrying issue despite admittedly never having spent longer periods in any endangered language environment, does a pretty good job systematically examining the causes of language death and what could be done to halt the process. He not only points out the fact that often communities themselves are to blame for not doing enough to pass on their native tongues to the following generation, but also examines what may have lead them to do so.

One shortcoming of the book is that very few actual "real-life" cases are mentioned to illustrate his points and breathe life into the subject, and those few cases that are mentioned only get a few lines - this leaves the text somewhat dry and academic.

He has also devoted one chapter to "Why should we care?", and as usual in books about this issue, that is where his writing is weakest. I found his arguments rather unconvincing, but also unnecessary - I personally don't feel the need to have practical arguments to care about preserving languages, which I think should be considered valuable in their own right.

A valuable extra in the book is the appendix listing organizations devoted to the preservation of endangered languages worldwide.
5.0 out of 5 stars The Cemetery of Dead Languages 17 Aug. 2014
By Dr.G. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Absolutely must be purchased by those of us who are interested in the disappearances of languages and have some clue about what a serious issue this is. It is is always tragic when a language (like a species of animal) becomes extinct because we lose modalities, paradigms, and ways of thinking. It is like lobbing off a part of the brain for a way of formulating or expressing a notion is forever sealed from our comprehension Ideas, insights, profound observations, truths, wisdom--gone forever. The extinction of a language is both folly and lamentable. This is one of the best books of its kind. But and read it.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An accessible presentation of a pressing world problem. 5 Oct. 2005
By Christopher Culver - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
David Crystal's book LANGUAGE DEATH is meant to bring attention for the general public to the dire loss of indigenous languages around the world--one every two weeks on average. This is a truly serious problem, and merits the attention of everyone. Crystal's work is somewhat scholarly--footnotes abound and it is published by Cambridge University Press--but the writer is expert at bringing eggheaded concerns to the average reader.

Crystal's book is organized according to five questions. In the first chapter, "What is language death?", he introduces the problem of the increasing disappearance of most of the world's tongues and how they are classified. "Why should we care?", the second chapter, explains the loss we face in the disappearance of each language. Crystal counters myths about language diversity. The existance of so many languages, he notes, is actually good for the market, for instead of fouling up capitalism, it creates competitive advantages when company A decides to deal with a minority group in its own language while company B thinks everyone should just learn English and consequently loses business. He also dispells the old myth peddled around by the Esperanto movement that having a single world language would create peace on Earth--after all, the 20th century has seen some bloody civil wars in places where people speak the same language, Cambodia, the former Yugoslavia, Rwanda...

"Why do languages die?" lays out how political oppression and globalization drives the disappearance of languages. One further cause that Crystal mentions, which I had never thought of before, is how the AIDS crisis in Africa will result in the death of myriad languages simply because all their speakers are dying. "Where do we begin?" recommends coordinated action, with both grassroots efforts to instill pride in one's native language combined with top-down government funding to finance traditional-language arts. "What can be done?" continues the previous chapter with a more long-range view.

If you find languages fascinating in the least bit, you should read LANGUAGE DEATH.
21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars It Simply MUST Be Read! 5 Jan. 2004
By LostBoy76 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I think that this is an extremely important book that should be read by politicians and concerned citizens in every country around the world. The mass extinction of languages that is occurring, and will continue to occur, from now on is a terrible tragedy in every respect. This book seeks to enlighten the reader by giving reasons why languages die, why people should be so concerned, and suggests ways to keep minority languages alive and well. The thought that more than 50% of the world's six thousand or so languages are going to die by the year 2100 should be enough to get many people motivated about preserving languages (and cultures), but the word needs to get out. That's why a book like this is so vitally important. Governments, as a general rule, need a good shove when it comes to projects like saving languages, which some cynics would dismiss as trivial or a luxury. The simple, straightforward manner in which this book is presented can be read and appreciated by anyone, not just linguists. What I liked very much about the book was that it never went overboard in blaming the so-called "language killers" like English, Spanish, Russian, Mandarin, and German. It offered concrete answers and laid a good portion of the blame on the people themselves, not just their oppressors. Incidentally, English is unique in that it is actually killing the other "language killers" in addition to minority languages, and (if current trends continue) may be the only language left on Earth by the year 2500!!
A book like this has a particular resonance for me because I have been studying Irish Gaelic for the last six months and I am determined to be fluent in the language within the next couple of years. But Irish is a threatened language that has less than fifty thousand fluent speakers worldwide, and the forecast is not good for the language unless something drastic is done in Ireland. A strong majority of the Irish people want the language to thrive, but government incompetence, underfunding, and English encroachment even into the Gaeltacht (Irish-speaking areas) are still happening. It makes me so sad and angry that this problem isn't being given due concern! And this only my particular situation; the story is the same for so many other languages! Unless people start taking action and making an effort (reading a book like "Language Death" is an excellent start to get an idea of what's at stake), the voices of so many of our ancestors will disappear in the coming century.
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