• RRP: £24.00
  • You Save: £3.60 (15%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
From Lance to Landis: Ins... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Dispatched from the US -- Expect delivery in 2-3 weeks. Shows some signs of wear, and may have some markings on the inside. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Shipped to over one million happy customers. Your purchase benefits world literacy!
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

From Lance to Landis: Inside the American Doping Controversy at the Tour de France Hardcover – 7 Jan 2013

4.1 out of 5 stars 59 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£20.40
£9.91 £1.00
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£20.40 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • From mountain bikes to cycle computers, find 1000s of products in our bikes store.


Frequently Bought Together

  • From Lance to Landis: Inside the American Doping Controversy at the Tour de France
  • +
  • The Program: Seven Deadly Sins - My Pursuit of Lance Armstrong
  • +
  • The Secret Race: Inside the Hidden World of the Tour de France: Doping, Cover-ups, and Winning at All Costs
Total price: £33.24
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Ballantine Books; First Edition edition (7 Jan. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 034549962X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345499622
  • Product Dimensions: 16.2 x 3.2 x 24 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (59 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 24,619 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

David Walsh is chief sports writer with The Sunday Times (London). A four-time Irish Sportswriter of the Year and a three-time U.K. Sportswriter of the Year, he is married with seven children and lives in Cambridge, England. He is co-author of L.A. Confidential: The Secrets of Lance Armstrong.


Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Midway through the third stage of the 1924 Tour de France, Henri Pélissier (winner of the 1923 Tour) abandoned. Journalist Albert Londres found him drinking hot chocolate at a train station restaurant. The interview Pélissier gave is still important. After explaining what the suffering racers endured he showed Londres the various pills and potions he took to both improve his performance and mitigate his misery. "We run on dynamite," he said.

Over the years the types of dynamite have changed. In the 1930s chemists synthesized amphetamines and racers soon learned how they could help and harm. Tom Simpson died in 1967 from the effects of dehydration, diarrhea and amphetamine overdose.

In the 1970s, the overuse of corticoids nearly killed 2-time Tour winner Bernard Thévenet. When he went public with his misdeeds, explaining that his use of steroids was the usual practice in the peloton, he received abuse from his sponsor, the public and his fellow riders.

In the 1990s EPO made doping necessary if a racer wanted to win. Riders like Marco Pantani and Bjarne Riis ran their hematocrits to a nearly lethal 60%. Any racer wishing to compete with these men and their like were forced to either stick the needle in their arms or retire. This is not just my guess. Many racers from that era (Andy Hampsten, for one) have gone public with how the sport was transformed by a drug that could dramatically improve a racer's power output.

Today, with a reliable test for EPO available, racers have gone on to new strategies, including old-fashioned blood doping. The best racers can spend over $100,000 a year on both the drugs and the technical expertise to avoid detection.
Read more ›
1 Comment 61 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Read "Its not about the Bike" and then read this for the most terrific counterpoint to the Armstrong fandom we all, including me, swallowed for so long. Walsh has dedicated his life to uncovering the facts and sometimes his links and evidence are necessarily a little tenuous and repetitive. However, overall in my eyes he dramatically proves his case. One's opinion of Armstrong emerges battered but even more complex and fascinating in some ways. Its clear that Walsh does sympathise with him and that Armstrong really had no alternative to doping if he wanted to win as he did.

Read Armstrong's denials and some of the reviews on this page and you do realise how unwilling we have become, as a society, to accept that our heroes can be less than perfect. This book shows that LA was far from saintly but an amazing and fascinating human and athlete all the same. Its clear from this book though that modern cycling and sport as a whole are a serious mess and we need to have a serious rethink about the celeb money-culture that dominates them.
Comment 24 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This is a good read. Walsh obviously spent a long time researching his material for the book, which is presented in a very professional manner. Not once in the book does Walsh make an unfounded allegation, everything is backed up with evidence.

Being a keen amatuer cyclist, I am well aware of what goes on in the professional peleton and it upsets me to hear people defend Lance Armstorng or any other cyclist for that matter who has tested positive. This for me is the root of the problems in cycling, nobody wants to knows, everyone is happy to turn a blind eye. People like Greg Lemond, Paul Kimmage and David Walsh should be listened to by all, the work they have done has often landed them in hot water and on the receiving end of much critism, but someone has to try and turn the tide.

This book is not all anti-Lance, for me it's more a story beginning with where cycling really began going south almost 20 years ago and where it has come since then. It describes how the best in the game abused the trust of their supporters and exposes the dirty truth of what cycling has become.

I thoroughly enjoyed this book and would recommend it to anyone curious about what really goes on in the professional peleton.
5 Comments 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This would be a fascinating book for its contents alone, but turns out to be much more than the sum of its parts, as is clearly evidenced by the other reviews arrayed here. These testify both to its polarizing effect and the amazing and very human extent of the ability of people to stand firm to their own prejudices in the light of often powerful contradictory evidence.

As a casual cycling fan enamoured, like many, of "Le Tour" I had long been curious about the depth of the antagonism between Lance Armstrong and the French press. As an innocent bystander I struggled to understand the intensity and longevity of a cold war punctuated by Armstrong's vehement insistence on never having failed a drugs test against an apparently orchestrated campaign of rumour and innuendo. The question, I always wondered, was whether there was actually a smoking gun.

Viewed from a completely neutral point of view, but with a good deal of hindsight, the basic facts about doping in cycling during late 1990's to 2000's, the period where Armstrong reigned supreme, seem very simple:

* It was a period of revolution in drug use and in particular in the use of EPO, a blood supplement which, unlike many previous alternatives such as steroids or even human growth hormone, produced an immediate and directly measurable improvement in performance by directly allowing users to absorb greater proportions of their oxygen intake and thus directly allowing more efficient use of the muscles

* EPO was, at the time undetectable in any doping tests.

Taken together, the clear inference here is that during this period cyclists could administer EPO with impunity (other than significantly increased risk of heart attack and stroke).
Read more ›
Comment 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback