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Lancaster Men: The Aussie Heroes of Bomber Command Paperback – 1 Apr 2013

4.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Paperback, 1 Apr 2013
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Product details

  • Paperback: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Allen & Unwin (1 April 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1741752078
  • ISBN-13: 978-1741752076
  • Product Dimensions: 15.6 x 3.4 x 23.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,206,375 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Peter Rees was a journalist for more than forty years, working as federal political correspondent for the Melbourne Sun, the West Australian and the Sunday Telegraph. He is the author of The Boy from Boree Creek: The Tim Fischer Story (2001), Tim Fischer's Outback Heroes (2002), Killing Juanita: a true story of murder and corruption (2004), and The Other Anzacs: The Extraordinary story of our World War I Nurses (2008 and 2009) and Desert Boys: Australians at War from Beersheba to Tobruk to El Alamein (2011 and 2012). He is currently working on a biography of Charles Bean to be published in 2015.

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A superbly written book taken from the men or their families, true life and puts into perspective the life they led and the sacrifices they gave.
As an BOMBER COMMAND researcher the book was for me an eye opener in the fact of what these airmen put up with, the final chapter covers there return home, they were seen by the greater AUSTRALIAN public as JAP DODGERS, some even received white feathers!.
As volunteers they never asked to be sent to europe, they in fact had greater losses than if they had served in the pacific theatre.
Very good book, if there is a follow up volume which he is thinking about then i will have no hesitation in buying it, very enjoyable reading.
Highly recommend it to anybody with an interest in Bomber Command ww2 history.
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Format: Paperback
In the cold light of day war is about statistics. Lose a smaller percentage of your force than your opponent over a period of time and odds are you’ll emerge victorious. It’s a numbers game. Strongest, fastest, heaviest … deadliest. Deadliest. That’s what it really comes down to. The best machine is nothing without the people who operate it. It is the people who make the sacrifice. It is the people who make the stories and the history. It is the people who make the numbers.

The percentages of Bomber Command are well known yet they will never lose their impact. Generally, of 125,000 aircrew, 46 percent were killed and 14 percent survived being shot down. Sixty percent, therefore, did not return home as they left (a clumsy way of putting it considering those wounded but you know what I mean). These are figures we expect to see in relation to the trenches of WW1.

Many of the sons of those who served in the trenches would spend their wartime career flying over the same hallowed ground in machines that could hardly have been dreamt of 25 years earlier. This ‘new’ form of warfare, though, exacted the same terrible toll. Like those in the trenches, the men of Bomber Command came from almost every corner of the world. When the war ended, the survivors – such as they were as not one remained unaffected – returned home to countries trying to rebuild and a public that, largely, would never understand the job they had to do and the camaraderie, the brotherhood, the family, that was a bomber crew.

The stories of these crews are seemingly endless, happily (after all there’s at least 120,000-plus out there!), and the market is certainly well-populated (again, happily) with books by or about the men of Bomber Command.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great book well written, I couldn't put it down.
I young cousin of mine flew in one of these now I know just what he and his crew went through.
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