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Lakota Woman Paperback – 31 May 1991

4.7 out of 5 stars 19 customer reviews

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Paperback, 31 May 1991
£18.74 £0.01
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: HarperPerennial; 1st HarperPerennial Ed edition (31 May 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060973897
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060973896
  • Product Dimensions: 20.8 x 13.5 x 1.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 499,928 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Praise for "Lakota Woman"

"Inspirational."--"The Midwest Book Review"

"A gritty, convincing document of one woman's struggle to overcome poverty and oppression in order to live in dignity as an American Indian."--"Kirkus Reviews"

""Lakota Woman" is a view from the inside."--"San Francisco Chronicle"

"A powerful autobiography ... feisty and determined, warm and even funny, sometimes given to outbursts of rage or sorrow or enthusiasm, always unpretentious and straightforward." --"Chicago Tribune"

"Stunningly honest .... The courage, nobility, morality, and humor that fill the pages of this book should be required reading." --David Amram

"The moving story of a Native American woman who fought her way out of despair and bitterness to find the righteous ways of her ancestors."--William M. Kunstler

"A piercing look into the ancient yet modern mind of a Sioux woman." --Oliver Stone

"Her searing autobiography is courageous, impassioned, poetic, and inspirational." --"Publishers Weekly"

Praise for "Lakota Woman"
"Inspirational."--"The Midwest Book Review"
"A gritty, convincing document of one woman's struggle to overcome poverty and oppression in order to live in dignity as an American Indian."--"Kirkus Reviews"
""Lakota Woman" is a view from the inside."--"San Francisco Chronicle"
"A powerful autobiography ... feisty and determined, warm and even funny, sometimes given to outbursts of rage or sorrow or enthusiasm, always unpretentious and straightforward." --"Chicago Tribune"
"Stunningly honest .... The courage, nobility, morality, and humor that fill the pages of this book should be required reading." --David Amram
"The moving story of a Native American woman who fought her way out of despair and bitterness to find the righteous ways of her ancestors."--William M. Kunstler
"A piercing look into the ancient yet modern mind of a Sioux woman." --Oliver Stone
"Her searing autobiography is courageous, impassioned, poetic, and inspirational." --"Publishers Weekly"

Praise for "Lakota Woman"
Inspirational. "The Midwest Book Review"
A gritty, convincing document of one woman s struggle to overcome poverty and oppression in order to live in dignity as an American Indian. "Kirkus Reviews"
"Lakota Woman" is a view from the inside. "San Francisco Chronicle"
A powerful autobiography feisty and determined, warm and even funny, sometimes given to outbursts of rage or sorrow or enthusiasm, always unpretentious and straightforward. "Chicago Tribune"
Stunningly honest . The courage, nobility, morality, and humor that fill the pages of this book should be required reading. David Amram
The moving story of a Native American woman who fought her way out of despair and bitterness to find the righteous ways of her ancestors. William M. Kunstler
A piercing look into the ancient yet modern mind of a Sioux woman. Oliver Stone
Her searing autobiography is courageous, impassioned, poetic, and inspirational. "Publishers Weekly"" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Richard Erdoes is the author of more than 21 books, including Lame Deer: Seeker of Visions, and American Indian Myths and Legends. An Austrian-born historian, ethnographer, and artist, he has contributed to many publications, including the New York Times, Time, Life, Fortune, Smithsonian, and the Saturday Evening Post. He lives in New Mexico. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Mary Crow Dog highlights the cruel depths of intrigue and depravity that the U.S. government and ciitzens, including some natives can sink to. She writes in a heart rendingly personal tone about the hardships she has faced because of instituitionalized and individual racism and how she fought it and continues to do so while holding her head high, despite often devestating circumstances. A tragedy with some hope and lots of heart.
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Format: Paperback
Born on a Sioux reservation in the Dakotas to a wayward father and a mother who left the traditional life for Christianity, Mary Crow Dog overcomes the difficulties of a young Native American girl to become a leader in her people's movement. This autobiography follows her early days in a Christian school and culminates with her protesting and giving birth at the 1973 Wounded Knee standoff between the troubled Lakota Sioux and the US government. Written in a conversational style, the book is tragic and, at times, funny as Crow Dog demonstrates her incredible strength and sense of humour in the face of seemingly unstoppable adversity. A stunning read.
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Format: Paperback
I've read a lot of books about AIM and the history of Native Americans and the First Nations. So far Russell Mean's autobiography is the one I go back to time and time again. I'd alqays wanted to know more about the women and their views and their thoughts. They were the ones that held families together whilst there were demonstrations and riots but they got very little coverage.
Lakota Woman was recommended to me and I cant believe it's taken me so long to discover it. Mary Crow Dog isn't a wonderful story teller - her narrative weaves in and out of a chronological order, and I'd have to sit back and put it all into place, but after a while I really got into it. Mary is talking to us - she's not writing to us. She's telling the story as though we were sat at her kitchen table.
There is little to read of her life growing up - typically indian for the 50s. She does reference the difficulties she faced, but it's when she gets more involved with AIM that we learn more about Mary and her dry sense of humour.
She describes how she learns to take pride in her culture, learning more about the ways of her people. She describes the sense of excitement during Wounded Knee, bring part of something so important and seeing her family and friends around her injured and killed. You never hear her say "It's not fair" which is something I think I'd have trouble not saying, but she constantly comments on how indians have a whole other way of being treated.
Lakota Woman won't give you any real insight into the political history of AIM, or any detailed information of Native civil rights, but it will tell you the story of a woman learning to take pride in her culture and heritage. I thoroughly enjoyed this.
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Mary Crow Dog highlighted the ongoing difficulties suffered by her people on the Indian reservations in America in this autobiography. A brave and spirited lady - I was sorry to read that she died earlier this year.
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Must read book about native americans, but also about women, spirituality, pride, dignity, hope, about the world we live in, about who we are,

raw and aesthetic, light and heavy, superficial and profound

it touches to everything that makes life, with the story of something destroyed and something reborn
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I have read several books on the Native American History as I really enjoy the understanding they show for the earth and all living things. This was more as it really made me feel a little as to how much suffering we have caused to the natural balance not only of a gentle people but a way of life destroyed without any consideration. The best book I have read so far on this subject.
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Format: Paperback
A breathtaking autobiography by Mary Crow Dog. This autobiography dipicts the life of an Native American in South Dakota in the seventies you see this through the eyes of a young girl from childhood to adulthood. Mary tells it how it was and spares no detail which makes this book very powerful. You see the racism that the Native Americans had to go through and also their struggles against society to gain freedom. This book is a must read for anybody who's interested in Native American Culture and the struggle they had to go through to be considered equal to whites.
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Rarely have I bought a book and read it from cover to cover on the same day. This story of Mary Crow Dog is written in a conversational style and chronicles her life growing up as a child of two worlds, her rebellious teenage years, the abuses of the Catholic church, who really should hang themselves on their own crosses, the siege at Wounded Knee in 1973 when outnumbered Lakota took on the power of the most powerful nation on the planet, her marriage to Leonard Crow Dog, his arrest and her fight to free him. In a world of plastic heroes, Mary Crow Dog stands out as one of a kind, I found it an easy read and yet at the same time it made me almost ashamed to be white. The antics of the Federal Bureau of Incompetency (FBI) are a direct parallel of Hitler's Gestapo. Had they done that in Britain or even Australia the police would all have been in jail serving long sentences. It's frightening that in a country that champions itself as the world's global policeman that such abuses can happen right in their back yards and they pretend it's not happening.
And yet through it all Mary Crow Dog's courage and humour shines through, you find yourself cheering for her towards the end, this book will remain on my bookshelf and will continue to be reread if only to remind myself that as Edmund Burke once said, 'evil does prosper while good people do nothing.'
A stunning read and one guaranteed to kindle once again the flame of freedom, a nation will be judged on how it has treated its poorest citizens. Cry freedom and let freedom live through the words of Mary Crow Dog.
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