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Ladybird Ladybird [DVD]

4.8 out of 5 stars 50 customer reviews

Price: £9.40 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
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Product details

  • Actors: Ray Winstone, Crissy Rock, Vladimir Vega, Sandie Lavelle, Mauricio Venegas
  • Directors: Ken Loach
  • Producers: Ladybird Ladybird ( Lady bird ), Ladybird Ladybird, Lady bird
  • Format: Import, PAL
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Run Time: 102.00 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (50 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000CCH9OG
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 131,132 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Australia released, PAL/Region 0 DVD: LANGUAGES: English ( Dolby Digital 2.0 ), SPECIAL FEATURES: Interactive Menu, Scene Access, Trailer(s), SYNOPSIS: Maggie Conlan is a unmarried mother. She had four children from four different men, that she left because they all beat her. The only night she left her children alone at home, they are hurt by a fire. So the social services take them away. She unsuccessfully fights to have them back. One day, she meets Jorge, a man that will simply love her without violence, and it seems she will now have a normal happy family life. But their new-born baby is also confiscated by the social services... Based on a true story. SCREENED/AWARDED AT: Berlin International Film Festival, ...Ladybird Ladybird ( Lady bird )

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

By @GeekZilla9000 TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 28 July 2011
Format: DVD
Ken Loach films always feel real, and as this is based on a true story the poignancy is enhanced and you can't help but feel that this is a fairly honest portrayal of Maggie - the mother whose instabilities lead to her lose her children.

The film starts with an introduction, the beginnings of a new relationship between Maggie and Jorge as they meet at a pub karaoke. Sensing her sadness he asks about her life and the film makes good use of flashbacks to ensure that we fully understand the situation she now finds herself in. Thinking back to her childhood she remembers her father beating her mother as she stands crying. The image of a child stood sobbing as her mother is being kicked to the floor is incredibly disturbing, especially when it looks so real. History repeats itself when we see Maggie's ex-boyfriend punching her to the ground and shouting abuse as her own four children witness the attack, it's the first of many which lead to her moving to a refuge with the kids and eventual involvement by social services. The family is finally torn apart when a fire in the flat leaves her eldest son badly burnt after she leaves them locked in while she goes out.

There's a duality to Ladybird Ladybird; flashbacks make up a large portion of the film and tell Maggie's backstory in a fragmented but comprehensible way, we learn early on that her children were taken away, then we understand why, and then we see her current life with partner Jorge and witness the massive impact that her past has on their relationship. As with many other Loach films this has an unpolished look which gives it a `fly-on-the-wall' quality, it's perhaps fitting that a drama based on a true story looks more like a documentary.
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By Brit Boy TOP 500 REVIEWER on 31 July 2011
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Crissy Rock gave the performance of her life in this gritty Ken Loach directed movie from 1994.

'Ladybird Ladybird' is based on a true story of a woman's seemingly endless fight with Social Services over the care of her children.

The movie's main character is Maggie (Crissy Rock), a single parent born and bread in Liverpool with four children, all of whom were to different fathers. Hurt and troubled Maggie has a history of getting into bad relationships. Her ex-boyfriend Simon (played by Ray Winstone) violently abused her causing her to run away; but the social services, concerned about her children after a home fire occurred when Maggie was away at the pub, resulting in one of the children becoming seriously injured, took them away from her and put them into foster care. When Maggie meets a gentle refugee called Jorge (Vladimir Vega), she feels that she might finally have a chance of happiness, the couple try for a baby, only for Maggie to be devastated by the Social Services once more.

This is a really touching film, a harrowing story of one woman's fight to win back her babies despite the odds. I regard this as one of Ken Loach's greatest movies and as for Crissy Rock's award-winning acting in it, I think Ken summed it up the best when he said: "I cannot think of anyone I have worked with who shines more brightly than Crissy Rock."
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By A Customer on 12 Jun. 2000
Format: VHS Tape
British director Ken Loach's 1993 film is so painful and unrelenting that it's nearly unwatcheable, but this is a credit to him and the warts -and-all screenplay by Rona Munro. It tells the tragic story of Maggie (Crissy Rock), a working class mother victimised by the Social Services child welfare who take her children from her. She meets a refugee, Jorge (Vladimir Vega) and he manages to bring some happiness to her life. Loach approaches the film like a documentary and even though we are told it is based on a true story, the culmination of drama is almost unbelievable. This approach applies to Rock as well. We never see her "acting" or strike a false note and she isn't afraid to show or edit Maggie's self-destructive behaviour. The image that stayed with me was the final one of Maggie and Jorge's hands clinging to one another. Not for the faint-hearted or those on Government benefits.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Truly remarkable and so well played by the two main characters . When I first watched it I started watching again as soon as it finished . I don't suppose the real people were as glamourize as it leads us to believe but chrissey rock is outstanding so well acted she deserves an award ,in fact she may have got one not quite sure
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Even for Loach, this is a dark film which looks at the experiences of a mother whose children are repeatedly removed from her and taken into care.

It's not easy to like the central figure, Maggie, who, at the stage when we first meet her has four different children by four different fathers. She meets the decent and caring figure of Jorge, a Paraguayan, at karaoke and he becomes a calming and stabilising influence on her life to whom she can "open up". Parts of the narrative are therefore told in flashback and we see glimpses of Maggie's abusive father and of an abusive relationship that Maggie has with a man who batters her yet whom she professes to love. The woman's difficulties with the authorities grow after she leaves her children at home alone to go to the pub and returns to find out that there has been a fire...

The central figure undoubtedly does not help her own case with her constant swearing at people around her, and Loach presumably wants us to see this as a clash of cultures in which a working class woman who fundamentally loves her children is not understood by middle class authority figures; but she seems, nevertheless, to be partly the author of her own misfortunes. Her tragedy is that these misfortunes continue when she finds stability with Jorge but the cycle of taking children into care continues. Do we then agree with the reading of the situation that Loach would presumably like us to have? Well, partially. It was impossible not to want the best for Jorge who loses two of the children that he has with his Maggie before being allowed to keep the subsequent children that he has with her, but we may wonder whether some of the complexities of the situation have been airbrushed away to create a narrative of class conflict.
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