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on 27 August 2013
A Lady of Cotton: Hannah Greg, Mistress of Quarry Bank Mill
David Sekers.
Still reading this book. Bought this after visiting Quarry Mill and previous to the tv adaptation.
Enjoying it.
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on 31 October 2014
I bought this book after watching a programme about Quarry Bank Mill with Tony Robinson. The book is based on the diaries of Hannah Greg who was married to the mill owner Samuel Greg. It is a fascinating insight into the life of Hannah who did much to help the poor as well as help her husband run the mill which was a very successful business and raise her family. The period of the last decade of the 1700's and first decade of the 1800's and the anxieties and fears were not so different from present day. Napoleon was a big concern then. The new technology of water and steam power was putting many hand loom workers out of a job which could mean homelessness and even starvation. Hannah wanted reform and a better government, she despised the Tories even then. If you like social history and the story of a remarkable woman of conviction to better the lot of the poor (she funded soup kitchens and provided schooling for the young mill apprentices mostly from her own money) then you will enjoy this informative book.
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on 23 March 2014
A fine, substantial history of an unusual woman, Hannah Greg who, near the end of the Age of Enlightenment, becomes an important player in the cotton industry. You should read this book.
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on 19 December 2013
This was bought for my wife, who has already read and enjoyed it, after watching the tv series. she would recommend this as a good read for anyone.
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on 4 September 2013
I found this interesting an illuminating. having visited Quarry Bank Mill in 1961 certainly added to the enjoyment. I really must go back one day - or several days as I understand there is now much more to see.
The gentleman who met us showed us an actual Apprenticeship document which had a hand-made pin in the corner; the wire had been coiled round at the top to make the pinhead, astounding workmanship and just one of several memories of the visit.
Hannah's story really adds to my visit and the memories of this wonderful site.
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on 2 April 2014
I bought this for my Mother-in-Law and she loved it. She had a family member in the Mill so thought she'd find it interesting.
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on 8 September 2015
I don't know why a book was written about her. Hannah Greg was born into wealth and marries into wealth in addition to having an exceptional education for a women of that age. Having read books about the Cadburys and Guinness's I kept wondering when they were going to do something. She is a dissenter, ( doesn't agree with the Anglican interpretation of the Christian faith ) and attends chapel with what we are told has a devout belief. However for all their high moral ground, interest and concern it never seems to go past talk. They were abolitionists but went quiet when they found they were in line for an inheritance of a plantation worked by slaves. The Greg's exploited the working and workhouse poor kids having them work 13 hours a day. It was government legislation that made them have to reduce the hours. It is a well written book but the Greg's faith in action appears only skin deep. Much of what they did, apart from education, was to maximise their business.
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on 22 September 2014
I decided to read this book after watching the Tony Robinson 'Real Mill' episodes on TV. I was somewhat disappointed that there is very little detail about Hannah's interaction with the children of the mill and most of the book seems to concentrate on her religious beliefs and visitors to Quarrybank.
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on 12 September 2013
Loved visiting Quarry Bank, and reading the book after being there, made it more enjoyable, Everything connected to Quarry Bank is interesting, when visiting the Mill and Apprentice house you get to feel very close to the people who lived and worked there.
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on 21 October 2016
I chose this book after visiting Quarry Bank Mill and learning about the lives of the apprentices, who were in her care. As an educated and erudite woman she managed to combine the daily management of the mill apprentices with her roles as mother, social hostess and literary discussion leader. She held strong views on several issues of the day and managed to subtly influence others, particularly Samuel, to do the right thing. An enlightening glimpse of the life of a middle class wife through development of the industrial revolution.
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