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Lady Chatterley's Lover (Wordsworth Classics) Paperback – 5 Aug 2005

3.8 out of 5 stars 453 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Wordsworth Editions; New edition edition (5 Aug. 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1840224886
  • ISBN-13: 978-1840224887
  • Product Dimensions: 12.4 x 1.3 x 19.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (453 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 38,605 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Amazon Review

Perhaps the most famous of Lawrence's novels, the 1928 Lady Chatterley's Lover is no longer distinguished for the once shockingly explicit treatment of its subject matter--the adulterous affair between a sexually unfulfilled upper-class married woman and the gamekeeper who works for the estate owned by her husband. Now that we're used to reading about sex, and seeing it in the movies, it's apparent that the novel is memorable for better reasons: namely, Lawrence's masterful and lyrical writing, and a story that takes us bodily into the world of its characters. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Review

"This abridgement is masterfully done and Emilia Fox reads even the most shuddering parts with dignity and authenticity." (The Observer) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Although I, like many others, began reading this book due to it's risque reputation, I gained far more from it than I could have imagined. Connie's frustrations with the modern world and her desire for something better touched me, and echoed my own hidden feelings. Regardless of the manner of writing, the philosophical (some would say long-winded) side-tracking, and the sex that it is famous for, I enjoyed every page, every sentence...yes, every word. Any woman who says she cannot relate to Connie has either experienced nothing of nature or felt no yearn for love. As a 20 year old woman from the country who now lives in the town, I was entranced by the imagery of the landscape and the primal feelings it provokes within Connie, and indeed within myself.
To any woman, or indeed, man: Read this book and you won't regret a page.
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Format: Paperback
A book which has achieved more notoriety for its sex scenes (shocking in 1930, when the book was written) than for its character studies, Lady Chatterley's Lover focuses on the affair between Constance, the "sturdy" young wife of Clifford Chatterley, and the antisocial gamekeeper on the Chatterleys' estate in the remote midlands. Constance, Lady Chatterley, who married Clifford a month before he left for World War I, becomes his caretaker when he returns from war paralyzed from the waist down and impotent. A writer who surrounds himself with intellectual friends, he regards Connie as his hostess and caregiver and does not understand her abject yearning for some life of her own.

The distance between Constance and Clifford increases when Mrs. Bolton, a widow from the village becomes his devoted caretaker, and he becomes increasingly dependent upon her. In a remarkable scene, Clifford finally tells Connie that he'd like an heir, and he does not care whom she finds to be the father of "his" child. Connie, yearning for an emotional closeness which she has not experienced in a previous affair, soon becomes involved with Mellors, the estate's gamekeeper. Crude and anti-social, Mellors has an honesty and lack of pretension which Connie finds refreshing.

Throughout the novel, Lawrence creates finely drawn characters whose interactions and gradual changes are explored microscopically. The growth of love between Connie and Mellors is complicated by the increasing self-centeredness of Clifford, whose outrage at rumors of their affair is motivated by Connie's choice of someone so far beneath her. To Clifford, the separation of the social classes is an integral and inevitable part of life.
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Format: Kindle Edition
This is an exquisite book, banned until the 1970's but written at the turn of the century. Lady Chatterly is married to 'his lordship' a much older and crippled man who is unable to fulfil an intimate role. A new gardener is hired and the book takes the reader into a genuinely beautiful relationship between a man and a woman. Yes it is steamy. Is it erotic? VERY. But it is not a trashy novel. It is a very well written and sensitive book. An absolute classic to have on the bookshelf - away from great aunt Edna and the kiddies!
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By Bacchus TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 28 Aug. 2014
Format: Mass Market Paperback
For such a well known book with so many reviews, it is hard for me to know whether I can add anything to what others have written.

One of my teachers at school grew up in Nottinghamshire and used to tell us that he grew up with people who had the mentalities of characters from D H Lawrence. He was not a great fan of Lawrence, regarding him as a bit of someone you would want to avoid in a pub. We all had copies of this book, knowing about its notoriety - I had my parents' early 1960s Penguin edition, which apparently sold over 2 million copies on the back of an obscenity trial testing out the Obscene Publications Act in 1959. I never got far with it at the time.

30-odd years further on, the obscenity trial and its titillation potential are forgotten. There are plenty of books which are far more graphic in their description of sexual intercourse than this one.

So, what can you derive from this book? For me, it is a beautifully written and quite exquisite account of the breakdown of a marriage and the union of people from different social classes. Such events are less shocking now than they must have been in the 1920s. There is much discussion about the times and environment that they are living in and also quite fascinating insights into personal relationships.

Some people have commented that the characters are one dimensional; I disagree. The three main players in the triangle are all fascinating. Sir Clifford Chatterley is not a particularly attractive character, a terrible snob and quite unbending to his wife's unhappiness. However,.he has great intelligence and insight as well as talent and energy. However, as his nurse Mrs Bolton observes at one point he has a steel like exterior with a soft inside.
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Format: Paperback
To really appreciate this novel, the reader has to be able to appreciate the context it was written in. At the time that DH Lawrence wrote Lady Chatterly's Lover, the idea of a married upper-class lady of a manor having an affair with anyone, would have been scandalous. Think back, readers, to a time long before women's rights, the vagina monologues, women in politics, and so on. Think back to a time of corsets and tight lips, of compromises, of a strong ruling class, and of ruling etiquette. The fact that Lawrence broke so many taboos with this book, by writing not only about the lady's unfulfilled personal life and her affair, but of her affair with the gamekeeper of her manor. Had Lady Chatterly not conveniently been left a small fortune to support herself with, she would have fallen quickly from grace and into the gutter, much to the pleasure of the rest of society- for any high brow lady who chose to have relations with someone as lowly as a gamekeeper would have been seen as fit for such punishment at the time. Think of Diana and Dodi for more context, if you must.

However, Lawrence treats his characters well. When I started reading this book I was of course aware of all the stigma and controversy surrounding it, but I also know that it was not uncommon for texts to be labelled as 'indecent' in Lawrence's time, as so many things were back then. To speak openly of sexual relations, particularly between members of different classes, would have been a massive slur in Lawrence's England. I expected, then, some rudeness, some crudeness, and some deliberate bating of the classes. What I found however, was that even in today's sexually open society, I was shocked by Lawrence's writing. I have never read anything quite like it- and I've read Mills and Boon!
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