£12.95
FREE Delivery in the UK.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
LIVING WITHIN LIMITS: Eco... has been added to your Basket
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

LIVING WITHIN LIMITS: Ecology, Economics and Population Taboos Paperback – 6 Apr 1995

4.0 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£12.95
£9.92 £15.78
Promotion Message 10% Bulk Discount 1 Promotion(s)

Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£12.95 FREE Delivery in the UK. In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Save 10% on Books for Schools offered by Amazon.co.uk when you purchase 10 or more of the same book. Here's how (terms and conditions apply) Enter code SCHOOLS2016 at checkout. Here's how (terms and conditions apply)

Frequently Bought Together

  • LIVING WITHIN LIMITS: Ecology, Economics and Population Taboos
  • +
  • A Matter of Degrees: What Temperature Reveals about the Past and Future of Our Species, Planet, and Universe
Total price: £25.21
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press USA; New Ed edition (6 April 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0195093852
  • ISBN-13: 978-0195093858
  • Product Dimensions: 22.9 x 2.5 x 15 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 180,893 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review

Wonderfully rich in original ideas and insights... compelling... A rare intellectual feast that challenges, charms, and engages the reader... A book that will be widely read and is bound to be enduringly influential. (Population and Development Review)

From the Back Cover

In Living Within Limits, Hardin focuses on the neglected problem of overpopulation, making a forceful case for dramatically changing the way we live in and manage our world.

See all Product Description

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
1
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
1st edition, reissued (1995), 311 pages

This is another of the twenty books that Charlie Munger recommends in the 2nd edition of Poor Charlie's Almanack (which I cannot recommend more highly). When a very widely read and highly effective thinker like Munger gets to eighty years old and recommends a list of just twenty books, I think one would be justified in expecting all of them to be pretty good.

Even so, as I make my way through his list I find myself pleasantly surprised at just how good some of them are. The clarity of thought Hardin demonstrates in this book is simply superb.

There is an important difference comparing this book to most others. Because so much of his subject matter (the subtitle is: `Ecology, Economics and Population Taboos') is smeared over by taboo and emotion, Hardin appears to have decided that in order to deal with this problem he also needs to demonstrate how to think properly.

Thus it is really two books in one: a manual on how to think effectively and a treatise on his chosen subject. For example, he hammers home the importance of default positions to provide the foundation for critical judgement (in economics: there's no such thing as a free lunch; in psychology: reward determines behaviour; in ecology: and then what?).

I am left with a feeling of gratitude towards both Munger and Hardin - without either of whom I would not have read this marvellous book.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I did not expect to read much new thinking - after all, the subject has been covered ad nauseam - but gave it a try based on a flattering review. And wow - some highly unconventional thinking, shattering the 'left/right' stereotypes, discussing questions (and offering answers) you would not expect from an 'ecologist'.
Fascinating, wide-ranging erudition; sharp deductive thinking; fearless debunking of myths and intellectual laziness.
A joy to read; sadly, I will have to keep most of it for myself as the contents are just too far out for politically correct dinner partners...
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
If I think about the books that have been written since the invention of the printing press - one of those books that really challenges taboo's. To be fair their are some scientists like Matt Ridley who are dismissive of "re-trendy alarmism about population". Chapter 8 of this book contradicts much of traditional economics and the idea that 10% or even 5% is a "sustainable growth rate". This is the book that predicted the credit crisis 15 years before it happened. And given his prescience analysis on the financial services and banking - the rest of the book really ought to be taken seriously. Makes a good read alongside Jared Diamond's "Collapse"
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is the first and only book I've read by the notorious Garrett Hardin. I must say that I wasn't disappointed: the man's reputation is well deserved. The book is called "Living within limits" and argues that overpopulation is a problem. Maybe, maybe not. But why is overpopulation a problem? And who should be living within limits?

If read carefully, Hardin wants to limit the population of the Third World. He does *not* question the high rate of consumption in the United States, since he explicitly opposes the notion that Americans should tighten their belts. In other words, Hardin wants to limit the population of the Third World, so that America can exploit more of the Third World's resources! True, he doesn't say this writ large, but the conclusion is obvious, if the book is read carefully.

Hardin also supports modern, "free market" capitalism, the very system which destroys the environment in the first place. He believes that a free market would discipline the owners to...well, live within limits. Since capitalism is based on accumulation, competition and always tends to corrupt the state apparatus, this is difficult to take seriously. While saying his prayers to the global market, Hardin nevertheless wants to curb immigration. Presumably, then, the remaining Third World population should work in sweat-shops south of the Rio Grande, rather than claiming a share of the pie when its brought up north.

This is a rapacious, Social Darwinist screed, written by a man who wants all the world's resources for himself. Essentially, the author calls for resource war. In Hardin's ideal world, he would eat, and we would be living within limits.

Deal's off.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.2 out of 5 stars 23 reviews
28 of 32 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Garrett Hardin and the Freedom of Limits 22 Aug. 2005
By Tom Andres - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book is essential reading. As someone lucky enough to have called Garrett Hardin my friend, I was once with him at one of his book signings in Santa Barbara, California. As two rather prosperous looking young women rushed by his display table, one said to the other: "`Limits'--I don't like it!" After which Hardin turned to me with a twinkle in his eye and said, "You see, she just summarized my whole problem." But one of the things that Professor Hardin is still teaching us, through his books and his students, is that once we accept the fact that the world has real ecological limits--for example, we stop assuming that we can cram a quarter-billion people into America, or that affordable substitutes for finite resources like oil and topsoil will be generated magically by the marketplace--the quality of our lives will actually improve. It is something like the little boy who has many scattered ambitions, from cowboy to Superman, upon reaching maturity being able to focus in on the adventure of passionately pursuing life's real possibilities. In his own life Hardin was anything but grim. Garrett Hardin just wanted to help our society grow up and, as said in Corinthians, put away childish things.
18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great book about the most important issue of our time. 3 Oct. 2009
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I would give this book 99 stars if I could. Garrett Hardin, most famous for his essay 'The Tragedy of the Commons' (look it up on Wikipedia), intellectually evicerates anyone who would be so foolish as to think that overpopulation is NOT a problem. Nearly every human ill can be attributed to the simple phrase 'too many people and too few resources,' and Hardin attacks this issue from every angle. As a self styled 'ecological conservative' Hardin attacks both liberal democratic and traditional conservative ideology.

I thought I knew a little bit about 'real' economics until I read this book, boy was I wrong. If, like me, you thought that Freakonomics was cutting edge and savvy then you would definitely love this book. Hardin clearly has a firm grasp on what economics is actually about. He throws everything at you - natural selection, Thomas Malthus, carrying capacity, demographics, Unmanaged Commons and so much more that this book is sure to open your eyes to the growing problem around us.

The only negative thing (hence the -1 star from 100) I can say about the book is that there is little continuity or flow to it. Rather than any continuous theme, it seems more like his lecture notes stuck together in some kind of topical series. Besides that, I highly highly recommend everyone read this book - sadly though, I am a realist and know that few will (to society's detriment).

If you like this book, you will like Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed; or if you liked Collapse, then you will like this book.
21 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Inarguable logic and laser sharp thinking 31 July 2005
By S. Overfield - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Reading this book was a revelation. In clear and precise prose, Hardin articulated all the feelings I'd had after years of observing people and their behavior. In the same way overly zealous Christians force the bible upon non-believers, I press this book and its ideas upon others. If everyone were to read this one single book and adhere to its simple and logical tenets, the world would be a reasonable and content place. What is even scarier than the future word we are going to inherit due to the people who impose misguided policies upon others solely to feel good about themselves is the fact that NO ONE outside of universities knows of this man or his books. I occasionally discuss his most famous essay The Tragedy of the Commons with some of the students in my college classes, and even though they all freely admit that his arguments and reasoning are irrefutable, they still think he's wrong because they "don't like" what he's saying. They offer no response or logical counter offer, they just "don't like it." Sadly, these people vote and shape our world, and the majority of my community unfortunately feels the same. If you have any interest in learning better and more productive ways of making choices and viewing the world regardless of the attractiveness of those guidelines, I cannot recommend this book enough.
14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A marvellous book distinguished by Hardin's superb clarity of thought 20 Jun. 2007
By Andrew Barrett - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
1st edition, reissued (1995), 311 pages

This is another of the twenty books that Charlie Munger recommends in the 2nd edition of Poor Charlie's Almanack (which I cannot recommend more highly). When a very widely read and highly effective thinker like Munger gets to eighty years old and recommends a list of just twenty books, I think one would be justified in expecting all of them to be pretty good.

Even so, as I make my way through his list I find myself pleasantly surprised at just how good some of them are. The clarity of thought Hardin demonstrates in this book is simply superb.

There is an important difference comparing this book to most others. Because so much of his subject matter (the subtitle is: `Ecology, Economics and Population Taboos') is smeared over by taboo and emotion, Hardin appears to have decided that in order to deal with this problem he also needs to demonstrate how to think properly.

Thus it is really two books in one: a manual on how to think effectively and a treatise on his chosen subject. For example, he hammers home the importance of default positions to provide the foundation for critical judgement (in economics: there's no such thing as a free lunch; in psychology: reward determines behaviour; in ecology: and then what?).

I am left with a feeling of gratitude towards both Munger and Hardin - without either of whom I would not have read this marvellous book.
14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars To the Point 12 May 2000
By Adam DeShong - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
A book about population and worldly limits would be uninteresting, most people would say. Not so about this book. Garrett Hardin puts it strait to the point, with no bull or flowery language. This is good especially for me, because science is not particularly my strongest area of intrest. The author puts the scientific facts in everyday language. In this book Mr. Hardin exaust every possibility for counter theories on population growth. I recommend this book to anyone that will be living in the next century. I feel it almost to be a duty to know what is in store for this planet if kept at this current pace.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback