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THE LIGHTNING THAT STRIKES THE NEIGHBORS' HOUSE (The Felix Pollak Prize in Poetry) Paperback – 30 Jan 2010

5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Product details

  • Paperback: 80 pages
  • Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press; 1 edition (30 Jan. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 029923584X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0299235840
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1.8 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,640,819 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Review

"Nick Lantz's "We Don't Know We Don't Know" and "The Lightning That Strikes the Neighbors' House" are both phenomenal books--the former is the 2009 Bakeless Prize-winner for poetry, the latter the 2010 Felix Pollack Prize-winner. Let's acknowledge that any writer who won just one of those contests would be worth attention; to win both prizes, and to have the books come out basically simultaneously, is the equivalent of a baseball player hitting a home run not just in his first at-bat, but off his first pitch." --"Rain Taxi"

"Nick Lantz's impressive poems are remarkable for their range and the variety of ways they maneuver down the page. . . . This is one of the finest books I've read in years."--Vern Rutsala

"Blending pop culture with history, dark humor with philosophy, and lyric intensity with a confident narrative voice, "The Lightning That Strikes the Neighbors' House" adds up to be far greater than the sum of its parts. The end result is a wise, intelligent book that lingers long after being read, and which further proves that Nick Lantz--despite the lethal irony of his work--is a poet to be believed in."--Kevin Gonzalez

"Lantz is a poet of many talents, but perhaps his greatest gift is juxtaposition. . . . We listen, amazed, as in poem after poem these notations we would have thought dissonant in fact harmonize, and then crescendo. That I can't figure out how he does it just heightens the thrill."--Joel Brouwer

"Lantz forces us again and again to reexamine the way we see through such a juxtaposition of facts as well as through the voices of characters who search for and experience improbable things: a cryptozoologist, those listening for aliens with SETI, a sci-fi actor, a werewolf. "The Lightning That Strikes the Neighbors' Hous"e becomes a lament not only for the neighbors and their tragedy but for ourselves--that we're unharmed, that we can keep on keeping on."--"The Rumpus"

Nick Lantz s impressive poems are remarkable for their range and the variety of ways they maneuver down the page. . . . This is one of the finest books I ve read in years. Vern Rutsala"

Lantz is a poet of many talents, but perhaps his greatest gift is juxtaposition. . . . We listen, amazed, as in poem after poem these notations we would have thought dissonant in fact harmonize, and then crescendo. That I can t figure out how he does it just heightens the thrill. Joel Brouwer"

Blending pop culture with history, dark humor with philosophy, and lyric intensity with a confident narrative voice, "The Lightning That Strikes the Neighbors House" adds up to be far greater than the sum of its parts. The end result is a wise, intelligent book that lingers long after being read, and which further proves that Nick Lantz despite the lethal irony of his work is a poet to be believed in. Kevin Gonzalez"

Lantz forces us again and again to reexamine the way we see through such a juxtaposition of facts as well as through the voices of characters who search for and experience improbable things: a cryptozoologist, those listening for aliens with SETI, a sci-fi actor, a werewolf. "The Lightning That Strikes the Neighbors Hous"e becomes a lament not only for the neighbors and their tragedy but for ourselves that we re unharmed, that we can keep on keeping on. "The Rumpus""

Nick Lantz's "We Don't Know We Don't Know" and "The Lightning That Strikes the Neighbors' House" are both phenomenal books the former is the 2009 Bakeless Prize-winner for poetry, the latter the 2010 Felix Pollack Prize-winner. Let's acknowledge that any writer who won just one of those contests would be worth attention; to win both prizes, and to have the books come out basically simultaneously, is the equivalent of a baseball player hitting a home run not just in his first at-bat, but off his first pitch. "Rain Taxi""

Lantz is a poet of many talents, but perhaps his greatest gift is juxtaposition. . . . We listen, amazed, as in poem after poem these notations we would have thought dissonant in fact harmonize, and then crescendo. That I can t figure out how he does it just heightens the thrill. Joel Brouwer

"

Blending pop culture with history, dark humor with philosophy, and lyric intensity with a confident narrative voice, The Lightning That Strikes the Neighbors House adds up to be far greater than the sum of its parts. The end result is a wise, intelligent book that lingers long after being read, and which further proves that Nick Lantz despite the lethal irony of his work is a poet to be believed in. Kevin Gonzalez

"

Lantz forces us again and again to reexamine the way we see through such a juxtaposition of facts as well as through the voices of characters who search for and experience improbable things: a cryptozoologist, those listening for aliens with SETI, a sci-fi actor, a werewolf. The Lightning That Strikes the Neighbors House becomes a lament not only for the neighbors and their tragedy but for ourselves that we re unharmed, that we can keep on keeping on. The Rumpus

"

Nick Lantz's We Don't Know We Don't Know and The Lightning That Strikes the Neighbors' House are both phenomenal books the former is the 2009 Bakeless Prize-winner for poetry, the latter the 2010 Felix Pollack Prize-winner. Let's acknowledge that any writer who won just one of those contests would be worth attention; to win both prizes, and to have the books come out basically simultaneously, is the equivalent of a baseball player hitting a home run not just in his first at-bat, but off his first pitch. Rain Taxi

"

About the Author

Nick Lantz is a writer and editor in Madison, Wisconsin, and a former Jay C. and Ruth Halls Poetry Fellow at the University of Wisconsin Madison. He is author of We Don t Know We Don t Know, winner of the Breadloaf Writers Conference Bakeless Prize."

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Wonderfully entertaining writer. His poems are funny, thought provoking and politically engaged. Some satirical poems in this collection are among the best of its kind.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 3.5 out of 5 stars 2 reviews
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Engaging Modern Poetry 25 Mar. 2010
By Stephen Krauska - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
My first reaction to Lantz's work was genuine intrigue. That's a great thing to find in the first few pages of any book, but a rare find in most poetry these days. Nick Lantz is alive in his work which is more than can be said about many modern poets. I was shocked with how quickly I finished the book, not simply because it is only 66 pages but because the book has a functional flow. It is effectively broken into sections that are somewhat telling of the poems found behind their subheadings, but mainly serves to more closely align poems of similar content. This technique added a great dimension to the book giving it an almost short novel feel. Overall I would rate this as a very well structured but not overly imposing collection of modern poetry. This is one of those uncommon books of poetry that is worth reading over several times, and thinking about several more.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Pretty standard stuff 5 Jan. 2013
By Jon Corelis - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I found these poems not bad, but mostly they struck me as uninspired illustrations of creative writing principles. Many of them are in the same form, either a long series of more or less decasyllablic un-rhymed couplets, or an equally long series of William-Carlos-Williams like variable lines; in both cases I found myself wondering what difference it would make to just write them out as prose. There are some occasionally successful patches and striking phrases: I found the most successful poem to be Battle Of Alexander at Issus, in which the famous battle is ironically ignored in favor of a taut and unified description of a hermit trapping rabbits in the mountains: if I remember any poem from this collection, it will probably be that one. Recommendation: the book has won an award and received some good reviews, but personally I wouldn't recommend it to anyone who has already decided that the typical verse coming out of the academies isn't worth pursuing.
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