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The Kite Runner by [Hosseini, Khaled]
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The Kite Runner Kindle Edition

4.6 out of 5 stars 2,027 customer reviews

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Length: 337 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

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Amazon.co.uk Review

The Kite Runner of Khaled Hosseini's deeply moving fiction debut is an illiterate Afghan boy with an uncanny instinct for predicting exactly where a downed kite will land. Growing up in the city of Kabul in the early 1970s, Hassan was narrator Amir's closest friend even though the loyal 11-year-old with "a face like a Chinese doll" was the son of Amir's father's servant and a member of Afghanistan's despised Hazara minority. But in 1975, on the day of Kabul's annual kite-fighting tournament, something unspeakable happened between the two boys.

Narrated by Amir, a 40-year-old novelist living in California, The Kite Runner tells the gripping story of a boyhood friendship destroyed by jealousy, fear, and the kind of ruthless evil that transcends mere politics. Running parallel to this personal narrative of loss and redemption is the story of modern Afghanistan and of Amir's equally guilt-ridden relationship with the war-torn city of his birth. The first Afghan novel to be written in English, The Kite Runner begins in the final days of King Zahir Shah's 40-year reign and traces the country's fall from a secluded oasis to a tank-strewn battlefield controlled by the Russians and then the trigger-happy Taliban. When Amir returns to Kabul to rescue Hassan's orphaned child, the personal and the political get tangled together in a plot that is as suspenseful as it is taut with feeling.

The son of an Afghan diplomat whose family received political asylum in the United States in 1980, Hosseini combines the unflinching realism of a war correspondent with the satisfying emotional pull of master storytellers such as Rohinton Mistry. Like the kite that is its central image, the story line of this mesmerizing first novel occasionally dips and seems almost to dive to the ground. But Hosseini ultimately keeps everything airborne until his heartrending conclusion in an American picnic park. --Lisa Alward, Amazon.ca

Amazon Review

The Kite Runner of Khaled Hosseini's deeply moving fiction debut is an illiterate Afghan boy with an uncanny instinct for predicting exactly where a downed kite will land. Growing up in the city of Kabul in the early 1970s, Hassan was narrator Amir's closest friend even though the loyal 11-year-old with "a face like a Chinese doll" was the son of Amir's father's servant and a member of Afghanistan's despised Hazara minority. But in 1975, on the day of Kabul's annual kite-fighting tournament, something unspeakable happened between the two boys.

Narrated by Amir, a 40-year-old novelist living in California, The Kite Runner tells the gripping story of a boyhood friendship destroyed by jealousy, fear, and the kind of ruthless evil that transcends mere politics. Running parallel to this personal narrative of loss and redemption is the story of modern Afghanistan and of Amir's equally guilt-ridden relationship with the war-torn city of his birth. The first Afghan novel to be written in English, The Kite Runner begins in the final days of King Zahir Shah's 40-year reign and traces the country's fall from a secluded oasis to a tank-strewn battlefield controlled by the Russians and then the trigger-happy Taliban. When Amir returns to Kabul to rescue Hassan's orphaned child, the personal and the political get tangled together in a plot that is as suspenseful as it is taut with feeling.

The son of an Afghan diplomat whose family received political asylum in the United States in 1980, Hosseini combines the unflinching realism of a war correspondent with the satisfying emotional pull of master storytellers such as Rohinton Mistry. Like the kite that is its central image, the story line of this mesmerizing first novel occasionally dips and seems almost to dive to the ground. But Hosseini ultimately keeps everything airborne until his heartrending conclusion in an American picnic park. --Lisa Alward, Amazon.ca


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1926 KB
  • Print Length: 337 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing; 1 edition (24 Feb. 2009)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00B0CR0O6
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars 2,027 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,558 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer reviews

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There are a lot of children in Afghanistan, but little childhood

The Kite Runner tells the story of Amir, the son of a wealthy Afghan and member of the ruling caste of Pashtuns. Amir’s companion as a child was his servant Hassan, from the despised and impoverished Hazara caste. Their bond is torn by Amir’s choice to abandon his friend amidst the increasing ethnic, religious and political tensions of the dying years of the Afghan monarchy. Despite escaping from troubles in his motherland, Amir will have to return to right past wrongs against the only true friend he ever had.

The comradeship between an affluent boy and the son of his father’s servant takes centre stage in the early stages of The Kite Runner, a novel set in a country that is in the process of being destroyed. A beguiling story that explores the price of betrayal, the efforts to gain redemption for past wrongs, and the undeniable connection and power that exists between a father and his son, whether it be a son striving to earn the affection of a father, or the sacrifices and lies that they both have to live with throughout their lives.

There are coincidences and clichés aplenty, and they play a part in detracting from what could have been a compelling classic. The inclusion of coincidences is designed to deliver a heartfelt image into the readers’ minds. These range from the Hassan-Sohrab heroic similarities, the Assed-Taliban inclusion, the emotional use of clef lips, and the professor-cum-homeless man that knew Amir’s mother. The fact that there is a catalogue of coincidences in the story-line does rather weaken the overall story as the effect of each coincidence lessens each time rather than it being a special and unusual moment.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
There are a half dozen or so themes in fiction. Hosseini’s is familiar enough (redemption) but with a near-contemporary twist (Afghanistan). Despite so much tragedy, the outcome is relatively hopeful: ‘There is a way [for Amir, the Afghan boy who grows up] to be good again’. It is impossible to fault so engaging an addition to the many splendid novels on the same theme.

Stewart Robertson
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I really enjoyed this book, and it was a very good surprise. Before I started reading I had fears that I would be bewildered with lots of foreign words and phrases, places names etc and it would detract from my enjoyment and understanding of the story, however these fears were totally unfounded. Hosseini writes so well and introduces any Pashto words within a sentence in a way that doesnt leave the reader confused or reaching for Google Translate!
The story itself unravels at a great pace and it never feels dull or boring. Its a moving, beautifully written story that definitely warrants all the praise and positive reviews it has gathered.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
One of my all-time favourite books - it's difficult to read some parts of the book, what the small boy endures, but for anyone from that part of the world it rings true. The language, the settings, the interactions all seem very authentic and it draws you in. The premise of the book is a large part of why it's compelling, and it draws the reader in from start to finish.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
From the first page I was in the story. Ignore the few and far between negative reviews...bet they wish they had an iota of this wonderful author's talent. Couldn't put it down! Brilliant thank you!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Such an emotive and touching book. Really makes you think, product came on time and in excellent condition, which is great for me as I like to collect and keep my books.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A story of two boys that you have to read about. Once they have captured you, you can't out this book down.
A really interesting read.
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Very good read so well written you actually feel you are with the boys living the joy sadneds and pain they experience growing up in Kabul
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