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KitchenAid Artisan Burr Coffee Grinder Red

3.8 out of 5 stars 37 customer reviews

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  • All metal construction
  • Fifteen adjustable grind settings
  • Glass 'grind container' minimises static cling, and the sealing ring reduces spillages
  • Dimensions approximately: 30cm deep, 34cm high, 15cm wide
  • 2 year guarantee
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Product Information

Technical Details
Brand KitchenAid
Model Number5KCG100BER
Item Weight4.5 Kg
Product Dimensions20 x 46 x 31 cm
  
Additional Information
ASINB000I0LFGA
Best Sellers Rank 1,391,456 in Kitchen & Home (See top 100)
Shipping Weight6 Kg
Delivery Destinations:Visit the Delivery Destinations Help page to see where this item can be delivered.
Date First Available23 Aug. 2006
  
 

Product Description

Manufacturer's Description

Top quality Kitchenaid burr grinder constructed in die cast metal and finished in red boasts 15 grind settings, a 198 gram capacity glass bean hopper and 241 gram capacity glass coffee grounds container, along with a 2 year guarantee

Box Contains

  • 1 Grinder
  • 1 Instruction book --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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    Customer Questions & Answers

    Customer Reviews

    Top Customer Reviews

    Format: Kitchen & Home
    I am very pleased with the KitchenAid Artisan 5KCG100 Coffee Grinder which I got after my disaster with the Dualit burr grinder (see my review of that).

    On the box it states in large letters that the burr grinders are made of stainless steel. You can unscrew the grind control dial and look at the burr grinders and they also provide a brush for cleaning them. Because the motor is on the side rather than underneath, there is nowhere for stale ground coffee to lurk, and the beans fall straight onto the grinders and then the ground coffee falls straight into the container directly underneath and there is no need for a shoot.

    This was almost three times more expensive than the Dualit grinder but in my opinion it is well worth the money. The whole thing seems to me to be designed to grind coffee well. The instruction book says you can recalibrate the grinders if you need to if they wear and even states what micron size the grind settings should produce (250-1250 microns). It seems to be well made, out of good quality materials (not cheap plastic and mild steel) and it is quite weighty.

    From the book "Large 5.72 diameter flat cutting burrs provide long life and superb grind consistency. Burrs can be adjusted to compensate for wear, or calibrated to meet stringent grind-size specifications for espresso and French Press grinds. A special DC motor and gear reduction system slows the rotation of the cutting burrs, minimizing the frictional heating of the grinds and preserving coffee flavour and aroma".

    I have just used the KitchenAid Artisan 5KCG100 Coffee Grinder to grind some freshly roasted beans and the coffee is delicious.

    Despite the price, I do think it is good value for money because of the excellent design and the build quality.
    Comment 29 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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    Format: Kitchen & Home
    I've had my Artisan grinder since 2006 and have used it all that time to feed a Gaggia Classic espresso machine. This means I'm surprised to read some of the comments here from users who've found it unsuitable for espresso; it may not be perfect but I've found it much better than adequate.

    First of all, it's a very pleasing device to have on a counter top, and the hammered grey paint has kept its looks well with no special treatment. The big selector dial and the on-off toggle switch both feel satisfyingly old-school. While I'm not especially keen on the glass collector - it needs to be perfectly aligned to slot under the chute and I'm convinced I'll manage to break it one day - it does reduce the problem of coffee grounds clinging to a plastic container, and it (and the top hopper) will clean up in the dishwasher.

    How does it grind? Out of the box, not perfectly, but there are a couple of easy adjustments to improve that. First of all, do as the manual says and select the finest range of grind options; even in this range, 4 (out of 8) is plenty coarse enough for a cafetiere, and much past 7 will choke the espresso machine. Then train yourself always to wind the dial back to zero before approaching your grind setting from below; there is some backlash in the mechanism and this method gives a much more consistent setting. Incidentally, you don't have to be constrained by the click-stops on the dial - it will work quite happily between clicks, which is sometimes where the optimum setting lies.

    The stock Artisan has a couple of other quirks that can be reduced or eliminated with a little fiddling. The worst offender is the sprung plastic disc through which grounds emerge.
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    1 Comment 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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    Format: Kitchen & Home
    Reading grinder reviews is frustrating. For anything under a £250 price tag, there are always some people saying 'Doesn't work for espresso' and others saying 'Just had a great cup of espresso with my xxx machine'. So you are left wondering if the first guy has simply failed to operate the thing properly (especially if they don't seem to know how to operate the Amazon review system and leave 4 copies of their bad review - he-hem) or if the second guy thinks anything is espresso if it's brown and comes out of a machine marked espresso. Or, what if the positive reviews are all from people with machines that are designed to cope with poorly ground coffee - eg the Gaggia Classic's 'prefect crema' device now shipped as standard? (Excuse me while I shudder. I'm such a snob. Unfortunately I'm a snob with a small budget, a coffee grinder that had been left at the house of a friend who promply disappeared off on holiday and an urgent need to buy a replacement locally that I could convince myself was a 'step up' and therefore not a ridiculous waste of money.) So I needed to take a risk, given that this was the only moderately 'high end' grinder available in local outlets.
    So, a reality check first. This may seem like a lot of money for a grinder if all you've had before is a little thing with whirly blades, but unfortunately in the world of espresso it is only just above the bargain basement. You are going to be at the limits of its fineness. It may depend on the machine you have and the beans you buy whether it works or fails. The rule of thumb is 'spend as much on the grinder as you do on the espresso machine'.
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    6 Comments 28 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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