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Kiss Me, Kiss Me, Kiss Me - Deluxe Edition Box set

4.5 out of 5 stars 37 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio CD (14 Aug. 2006)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: Box set
  • Label: Commercial Marketing
  • ASIN: B000FZDGTW
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (37 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 155,305 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
  • Sample this album Artist (Sample)
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Product Description

Amazon.co.uk

Universal UK pressing features the same content as the Rhino/US version, though packaged in the standard Universal 'Deluxe Edition' slipcase. Two CD set compiled by Robert Smith and digitally remastered from the original master tapes. This album was originally released in 1987.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
I'm so glad they've finally put 'Hey You' back on the tracklist. This was inexplicably missing on the original cd but present on the vinyl and cassette versions of the album. This for me was the last, great Cure work of art and for me it's right up there with Faith and Pornography as my 3 favourite Cure albums. The opening track is just phenomenal. A really long doom-laden guitar melody introduces Robert's most venomous vocals and lyrics to date. I absolutely love it, easily one of the best Cure tracks ever! This album is around 50% dark doomy Cure and the other half is more poppy but don't let that put you off because I think this album appeals more to the older 'true' Cure fans than those who like the newer poppier stuff post-Wish. Essential Cure!
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Format: Audio CD
It can be hard to tell what the main theme is to this album. Love or death. On a lighter note, Robert Smith provides us with some superb, pop rock songs like "Just Like Heaven" and provides us with catchy dance beats to songs like "Hot Hot Hot!!!" displaying muscial genius along the way. On a darker side, Smith portrays the darker side of love with epic and truelly gothic tracks like "the kiss" and "the snakepit". The album plays out like a balanced argument displaying the joy and happiness of love and the pain and torture of rejection when i can not be found. This album is fantastic to buy because it suits two main moods; happiness and depresion. The only downside to the album is perhaps the quality of Robert Smith's vocals on certain songs where he is clearly lacking the quality heard in 1985's "The Head On The Door". Nevertheless, this album is perfect for anyone into pop/alternative rock or someone who wants to see what The Cure have to offer.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
By 1987 The Cure were in their stride, combining mainstream success with critic success, thanks mainly to the 36 minute "Head on The Door" album.

"Kiss Me (x3)", an 18 song extravaganza (well over an hour in length) is an amazing collection of dark and dour, but with those killer Cure hooks.

The singles were firm and bubbly ("Just Like Heaven" may just be the greatest Cure single of all time), but digging futher tracks like "Torture" and "One More Time" are just so excellent it makes the hairs on your body stand up.

The second disc is full of the compulsory demos and "live bootleg" tracks cuz most of the other material has found it's way out on various boxsets over the years. It's still amazing to hear the germination of the final product though.

This album is highly recommended!
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By Daniel Jolley HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on 15 Jan. 2003
Format: Audio CD
Kiss Me, Kiss Me, Kiss Me is one of my favorite Cure albums. It’s packed with great music and has a discernible atmosphere that distinguishes it from most other alternative music. The Cure was a big part of my teenaged years, and this music sounds as good today as it did back then. Just Like Heaven and Hot Hot Hot!!! are the two tracks most likely to be familiar to the uninitiated, the first song catching the group at one of their more mainstream (yet unique) moments and the latter proving that The Cure could appeal to a wider audience while remaining perfectly and distinctively themselves. My nod for best song on the album, though, would go to Why Can’t I Be You? which is actually quite upbeat and danceable (if you’re so inclined). This song is one of several that deliver a virtual cacophony of sound, including prominent horns against the familiar background sounds of the band. Catch, How Beautiful You Are, and The Perfect Girl have an infectious, ditty-like quality to them, breaking the music free from the clinging maudlin environment one expects to find front man Robert Smith in much of the time. Of course, melancholia exists among these tracks as well. If Only Tonight We Could Sleep is a slow, sentimental song which sounds wonderful until you get to One More Time, which outdoes it in poignancy. And then you get to A Thousand Hours; if ever a Cure song could be called beautiful, this is the one. Robert Smith says more in a few words than most singers do over the course of an entire album. When Smith sings “For how much longer can I howl into this wind, for how much longer can I cry like this?Read more ›
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This album caused quite a stir within the music media when it was released (1987). Just two years earlier The Cure had finally broken through as a major commercial act, following six years of trying their best not to, and the prospect of a double album (as was the form it's original vinyl release took) from these unexpected megastars got more than a few people quite excited.
All their expectations were fulfilled, the album containing 4 bona fide hit singles and 13 other classics, many of which could have been suitable choices for singles.
The album kicks off with The Kiss, a heavy wah-wah driven track - the full 6:17 of wild guitar (with few repeating phrases) being performed in one take by vocalist Robert Smith rather than guitarist Porl Thompson, which surprised many given Porl's reputation as the "solo" guitarist out of what was a 2-guitar line up (Smith and Thompson). After this, we move into Catch, a mediterranean style piece of pop which is acknowledged by most Cure fans as being one of their greatest singles.
The opening two tracks set the pace for the rest of the album really. The 17 songs pretty much go from rock/sort-of psychedelic to pop back to rock/sort-of psychedelic back to pop, and so on throughout the album.
This is a concept that the band employed years later for Wild Mood Swings (1996), however on that particular album it doesn't really work simply because most of the songs just aren't strong enough to carry it off.
On Kiss Me Kiss Me Kiss Me it works brilliantly though.
Like I said, most of the songs could have been singles, and of the songs that couldn't (i.e. the rockier or sort-of psychedelic stuff) are all absolute classics as well, so there aren't any problems with mixing and matching styles.
Read more ›
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