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Kinship and Family: An Anthropological Reader (Wiley Blackwell Anthologies in Social and Cultural Anthropology) Paperback – 5 Jan 2004

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Review

"One looks to a Reader to be authoritative: this is also a highly imaginative collection. Nuanced as well as balanced, the editors compilations bring out the best not just in the study of kinship but in anthropology. A tonic for old hands and new hands alike." Marilyn Strathern, University of Cambridge <!––end––>

From the Back Cover

Drawing on their complementary areas of expertise, Parkin and Stone have produced the most comprehensive reader on kinship available. Kinship and Family: An Anthropological Reader is a representative collection tracing the history of the anthropological study of kinship from the early 1900s to the present day: from the classic works of Evans–Pritchard, Lévi–Strauss, Leach, and Schneider, to the electrifying contemporary debates on such issues as surrogate motherhood, and gay and lesbian kinship.


By bringing together for the first time such an array of articles on kinship and its relation to social organization, this volume offers students and professionals a survey of the most important and critical work in the field. Kinship and Family: An Anthropological Reader includes extensive discussion and analysis of the selections that contextualizes them within theoretical debates.

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Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars 2 reviews
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great item, just boring 3 Feb. 2013
By nic - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have to have this for class so my review is based upon this. It is some dry reading but quite informative it was in wonderful condition!
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great collection 20 Nov. 2008
By Ben Franklin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is a great collection of readings, and the introductory sections on descent, alliance, and contemporary studies are excellent as well, though the role of David Schneider in the "demise" of kinship after 1970 - as well as the "demise" itself - is probably overstated. Afterall, there were many voices of dissent at the time, including Leach and Needham. But overall they provide a good framework.

The reader is a little demanding for undergraduate students, and indeed the alliance selections will probably be a challenge for novice instructors. It's probably best suited for upper division students with a strong lecture / guidance or for a graduate seminar. Parkin's introductions are much more accessible than his earlier textbook, and broader in focus.
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