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The Kingdom of Gods (Inheritance Trilogy (Paperback)) Mass Market Paperback – 1 Apr 2012


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Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 582 pages
  • Publisher: Orbit; Reprint edition (April 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 031604394X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0316043946
  • Product Dimensions: 10.8 x 3.2 x 17.8 cm
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,121,558 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Praise for The Inheritance Trilogy:
"The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms... is an impressive debut, which revitalizes the trope of empires whose rulers have gods at their fingertips. --- io9.com
"Many books are good, some are great, but few are truly important. Add to this last category "The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms," N.K. Jemisin's debut novel...In this reviewer's opinion, this is the must-read fantasy of the year." --- "Bookpage
"""The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms "by N.K. Jemisin is a highly promising debut.... A similar blend of inventiveness, irreverence, and sophistication - along with sensuality - brings vivid life to the setting and other characters: human and otherwise...."The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms" definitely leaves me wanting more of this delightful new writer." --- "Locus"

Praise for The Inheritance Trilogy:

"The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms... is an impressive debut, which revitalizes the trope of empires whose rulers have gods at their fingertips. --- io9.com

"Many books are good, some are great, but few are truly important. Add to this last category "The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms", N.K. Jemisin's debut novel...In this reviewer's opinion, this is the must-read fantasy of the year." --- "Bookpage

"""The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms "by N.K. Jemisin is a highly promising debut.... A similar blend of inventiveness, irreverence, and sophistication - along with sensuality - brings vivid life to the setting and other characters: human and otherwise...."The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms" definitely leaves me wanting more of this delightful new writer." --- "Locus"

About the Author

N. K. Jemisin is a Brooklyn author whose short fiction and novels have been nominated multiple times for the Hugo, the World Fantasy Award, and the Nebula, shortlisted for the Crawford and the Tiptree, and have won the Locus Award. She is a science fiction and fantasy reviewer for the "New York Times, "and her novel "The Fifth Season" was a "New York Times" Notable Book of 2015. Her website is nkjemisin.com.


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.3 out of 5 stars 91 reviews
27 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A satisfying conclusion 23 Oct. 2011
By Sarah - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In reading other reviews of this book (mostly on GoodReads) I know that fan reaction to 'Kingdom of Gods' has been mixed. I happen to fall into the camp that absolutely loved it. For reference: I loved loved loved Hundred Thousand Kingdoms, was somewhat less taken with Broken Kingdoms (Itempas is not my favorite character, although I did feel more favorably towards him by the end of 'Kingdom of Gods'), and didn't know how I was going to react to this book.

The central character in this story is Sieh, the oldest of the godlings, the trickster, the perpetual child. Throughout this story, he is supported by Shahar and Dekarta, twin children of the Arameri ruler. While the back of the book may lead you to believe that Sieh and Shahar are the driving force of the story, Dekarta is just as important a character. Everything in this universe that N.K. Jemisin has created, after all, is driven by the number three. Yeine, Nahadoth, and Itempas also play important supporting roles, and the story begun in 'The Broken Kingdoms' is also carried forward.

I am hesitant to delve too deeply into the plot, as part of the joy of these books (for me) has been letting the story unfold in front of me, never quite sure what was going to happen next. One part of the premise, though, is that someone is targeting the Arameri royal family with a deadly new sort of magic, one that confounds the mortals, godlings, and Gods alike. This thread running through the story allows N.K. Jemisin to set the story in both the palace and the city below, building off of the foundations laid in the first two books.

For me, this was a very satisfying read. If you aren't a fan of Sieh, your mileage will almost certainly vary. But I really enjoyed it! And I felt it was a satisfying conclusion to one of my favorite fantasy series' in recent memory.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars great read, but character arcs through three books felt incomplete 12 May 2013
By Jane M. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
**This review has no spoilers and addresses all three books in this trilogy as a story arch**

Great read! I had never read NK Jemisin before but I thoroughly enjoyed this series, which I read on my Kindle. Inventive, not your usual "high fantasy," and each book has a slightly different feel. Four stars because rather than choosing between Among Other's insightfully described "writing style vs. plot," Jamisin's Inheritance Trilogy has both: entertaining, accessible writing and creative, interesting plots that kept me reading through the night. Well, several nights. The subtle (sometimes not so subtle, but never offensively so) commentaries on race, culture, class, religion, and the question of nature vs. nurture were thought provoking, but never interrupted the flow of the story or digressed into preaching/ sermon.

Four stars, vice five, because I was disappointed that there wasn't an overarching focus on the main three characters development across the three books despite the above-noted common themes (each book feels like the same universe and is internally consistent all the way through). Maybe I'm just too used to the six episode Star Wars movies (ohhhhhhhh.... it really is ALL about Darth Vader....) or the feeling of LOTR (how Aragorn grows! Sam is actually a more interesting character than Frodo!), but I found myself waiting for that sort of bridging between novels, and it never really happened. The characters are all there, you see them from different perspectives (in a wonderfully skillful presentation of the complexity of humans, and the gods that act like them, and the lenses through which we all see the world), but each of the three/four main gods have their "moments" in each of the books. As a result, the character development/arch of the gods with more substance in the first two books felt incomplete when I finished book three.
That said --- don't let this relatively small comment stop you from reading these wonderful, hard-to-put-down fantasies.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Best of the series, but marred by a few key elements 9 July 2012
By M. Jackson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
It's always nice reading a trilogy which progressively gets better, despite initial problems. I think Jemisin has achieved that with "The Kingdom of Gods". The plot is more deftly worked, and the mysteries that are set-up are better executed than previously, but there are still a number of issues I have with the writing. These issues mainly revolve around the execution of ideas, events, and story progression, rather than the content of those elements.

The story is written very well. The premise is interesting, but that isn't the real point or focus of the story, even though it acts as the centrepiece around which everything else moves. Events flow together quite well until the last 150 pages, and the last 100 pages in particular suffer. It's there that things begin to unravel a bit; until this point, we get a steady stream of information and story development, and the introduction and resolution of small mysteries. I think the pacing in the last section is too quick. Furthermore, it highlights a number of weaker elements in the rest of the story which I don't think have been fully developed, or which could have been more deeply foreshadowed. Everything makes sense, but it feels threadbare, and gets a bit lost in the rest of the story.

Also, if it weren't obvious by this point that this trilogy is focused mainly on the pantheon of gods here rather than the cultures, this book puts that notion to rest. I found this disappointing, but this all really comes down to personal taste. We don't get any more of the cultures than is necessary, and this is fine, but I thought it sometimes lead to unexplained societal phenomena which hurt the authenticity of the story.

I found Sieh's characterisation interesting, but not without flaws. After previously writing from the perspective of two female characters, writing a male godling is understandably difficult. Jemisin mostly does this well, but I still find the writing style too similar to the other books. It's distinctively Jemisin, but it doesn't feel neutral enough for her to get away with it, and it times I felt like it came too close to the characters from the other books. But if you're not as pedantic as me, this probably won't be an issue. On a positive note, the character is much more clearly differentiated from the previous two protagonists.

Oh, and the retrospective interjections are finally gone, apart from one part at the start of chapter one which specifically tells you that they're gone.

The other characters are fairly well drawn. The antagonist needed alot more work. There were alot of new characters who put in brief appearances, mostly to better characterise Sieh. The main cast of characters are well drawn, and those who had already been introduced in the previous two books got more depth. The characters are, by and large, simply written well enough so as not to be intrusive. Alot of the secondary characters are really compelling, and I felt they often outperformed the main cast. I think there are still some issues with flat characters, either falling squarely in the camp of good vs bad. Despite some problems early on, though, I felt this was much improved.

My biggest gripe here, though, is with the romance and relationships. I found some of the changes in temperament unbelievable; particularly how quickly a certain female character changes in chapter three. In other cases, events move too quickly, and while Jemisin does a good job at slowing them down it's still too rushed (I found this particularly problematic in the last two chapters of Part One). Similarly, I didn't find the romantic relationships, and how deeply they're supposed to run, believable, given how quickly they come about. There's an explanation given, but I found this unconvincing.

I also have some minor gripes with the writing. E.g., multiple emotions surfacing on characters faces in a span of moments, the descriptions aren't always clear, etc. They're present in the first two books, so if you didn't find them problematic there you probably won't here.

And I really disliked the Coda. Again, though, this is an individual thing. I can think of arguments for and against it. Personally, I think it's too sentimental, although the first half is fine and could have had a place elsewhere, and I feel that it cheapens the rest of the story. I think the end of the last chapter was a fitting end, however; it's very powerful, and is also conclusive. But again, personal preference will play a large part here.

Despite these issues I think this was the best book in the series. Still brought down a bit by the last hundred or so pages, as well as some other blemishes, but I think this is also in part because of the quality of the middle sections (Parts Two & Three) and the rest of the other writing. And it's a testament to the story that I feel so strongly about the things which disappointed me. This is certainly a recommended series and author.

4.5/5
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars It pains me to give this such a low rating 8 Feb. 2014
By Frazier83 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
But I'm glad I'm not the only one who feels this way about it, confused about why this book was so jarringly different from the first two.

I devoured the first 2 novels in a couple of sittings. They were just that great! (Book 2 is my favorite.) And while I was prepared for the POV shift in this novel, the story still doesn't seem cohesive to me. I stopped halfway through and have never bothered to pick it back up. That was last year. I think I started to get confused when the character of Ahad was introduced, and how he looks and acts like Naha, but isn't Nahadoth. And while I accepted across the entire series, that there are god-like laws and alternate universe ways that my human brain won't comprehend, I just couldn't wrap my head around that one. I never recovered from that, and things just sort of snowballed from there.

I still enjoy N.K.'s writing. To me, she's great a person to step up and fill that void that the passing of Octavia Butler has left. We need more Black sci-fi / fantasy writers, and she's a woman to boot. I look forward to reading more from her!
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Sieh's story is a great conclusion to this trilogy! 11 Dec. 2014
By Shay VanZwoll - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
Sieh is the oldest godling and first child of The Three, yet he must spend his time eternally as a child. As the god of Childhood, Tricks, and Innocence, going against his nature would kill him. With a sun as a kickball, he wanders where he will... Until the day he meets two Arameri children and decides to pledge friendship.

Now trapped as a mortal, Sieh must decide how to best protect himself and the mortals he loves, even as a forgotten secret from his past threatens to destroy everything.

Set roughly 100 years after the beginning of the series, this novel feels slower since the action takes place over a greater period of time - years instead of days or weeks. Showing us more background on Sieh, Enefa, and the Gods' War, I really enjoyed the chance to learn more about how they all came to be. This book is well-written and the action does pick up later in the story, making this book a satisfying conclusion to this trilogy.

The Kingdom of Gods is the third book in The Inheritance Trilogy, which I received from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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