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Kingdom Come (New Edition) Paperback – 28 Nov 2008

4.1 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 232 pages
  • Publisher: Titan Books Ltd (28 Nov. 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1848560923
  • ISBN-13: 978-1848560925
  • Product Dimensions: 17 x 1.1 x 25.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 782,872 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Mark Waid is one of comics' most highly respected and popular writers, having written the Eisner award-winning Kingdom Come, as well as The Flash, Fantastic Four, Superman: Birthright, JLA, Legion of Super-Heroes, X-Men and much more. Alex Ross has produced a remarkable body of work which has won him every major award in the industry. His best-known books include Kingdom Come, Marvels, Uncle Sam, and Batman: War on Crime. His artwork is collected in Titan Books' Mythology.


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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The reputation of this story precedes it. For many, including myself, this edition represents nothing more that a chance to see a story that has shaped modern comic books. As a result I didn't find this to be the ground shaking work I was expecting, mostly because so many later comics have run with similar themes of what it means to be a hero. I can imagine that if you were reading this as it came out then it would have absolutely blown your socks off. For someone who has read it progeny before the original, you are left with a finely crafted, consistenly intersting piece of work that it absolutely stunning to look at. Definitely recommended.
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Format: Paperback
SPOILERS

"Kingdom Come" is one of the most boring, overrated, and simply bad "event" books from DC I've read. It lacks a coherent narrative, competent writing, strong characterisation, and, maybe most basic of all, an interesting story. Mark Waid's writing on this book is truly abysmal. The saving grace of this book is Alex Ross' artwork which may be the reason so many people think it's a "classic" of the superhero genre. But even Ross' photo-realistic art can't save it from the literary quagmire it drives itself into and fails to leave for the entirety of this book.

The story setup is most baffling of all. Superman has "retired" for 10 years because he lost his parents and Lois. He just felt he couldn't be Superman anymore. Uh... ok. But then everyone else in the Justice League, except Batman, decide to call it a day too! Green Lantern builds himself a giant green space station and sits on his throne, Hawkman flies about the Pacific North-West, Wonder Woman disappears back to her island, Flash runs endlessly in circles. Why?! Just because Superman hung up his blue and red costume? It doesn't make sense and it's never explained. So in the vacuum the JLA left, a new, younger generation of superhero arrives. These guys aren't really superheroes, they don't care about honour or protecting the innocent, they just fly about the place, smashing things up, firing off lasers, doing all kindsa nutty things - for no reason. It's never explained just why these new superheroes have no conscience - except that that's what Mark Waid wrote in his script, so that's it. Great. Arbitrary nonsense.

So after Magog - who is now the superhero the world deserves, I suppose?
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is definitely worth a try, the storyline is great, very enjoyable, the characters are likable and funny when needed, the art is fantastic, it’s good to look at. I recommend this book to anyone who loves comics or just interested in getting to know the genre.
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Format: Paperback
Kingdom Come is a tough book to rate. On the one hand, it does possess level of depth that sets it far above most "comic books" on the newsstand. On the other, such depths as you will find are, to be brutally honest, entirely - yes, entirely - derivative of what Alan Moore had already given us in Watchmen more than a decade earlier.

Fundamentally, this is Watchmen revisited.

Or at least, it's one layer of Watchmen revisited. By the time Kingdom Come came along, the iron age of comic books was well and truly in full swing. Titles that took a long, hard look at the ideal of the superhero were positively in vogue. That's what we get here. But the deeper, less genre-specific layer of Watchmen? The layer that took an even longer, and even harder look into the absolute void of a truly meaningless and amoral universe?

That is not within the scope of this work.

But although Kingdom Come is most certainly a retelling, it is a good retelling. Like so many comic book writers, Mark Waid is presenting afresh a tale not his own; a tale with a course and an ending as pre-ordained as that of any tragic or comic opera.

Taken on such terms, what matters is not so much where we end up, but how we get there. The writing, although lacking Moore's originality, is good: I'd give it a solid "B+". But the real star of the show is undoubtedly the art. Throughout this tale, the art maintains a level of quality and sheer detail that we normally only get to see on covers, if at all. Even more than that, the artist, Alex Ross, makes a real artistic statement by depicting many of the characters and much of the action with a kind of hyper-realism that very clearly alludes to the work of Norman Rockwell.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I actually bought this graphic novel as a present for someone else. However, I had read this a few years back and knowing the interests of my brother, thought this a very good present for him. Alex Ross is a brilliant illustrator and the story keeps you gripped to the end.
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Format: Paperback
I was bought up with the 1960's Superman and Justice League of America. In those days the books were easy to read and always had a positive ending. I wanted that as a young child and I yearned for my heros to be good and win in all scenarios.

Problem is with age you start to think the odd "what if". What id the superheros weren't always good. What would they do if they were older? What would, if any, next generation of Superhero be like. This, like someone else already says in their review is a Watchmen style story. No longer is every story a good ending.

I bought the book as I had other artwork books of Alex Ross and I wanted to see his work and see how Superman had changed. I liked the story, though at times it was somewhat dark. However, I really liked the humour, especially in Planet Krypton. Nice touch. Reminded me of the fits Justice League of Europe where Guy Gardner (Green Lantern) refers to Batman as "big ears".

The story has depth and the artwork is glorious. I like the resurrection of Sandman and Spectre, who I always rate as underrated. The story whilst having overtones of Watchman also takes it theme in places from Charles Dickens Christmas Carol which was rather fun. All in all a pleasant read.

By the way where do superheros get their costumes? Is there a superhero tailor in Saville Row or are they are good at dressmaking?
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