Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £5.03

Save £4.96 (50%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.
kindle unlimited logo
Unlimited reading. Over 1 million titles. Learn more
Read for £0.00
OR

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

The King in the North: The Life and Times of Oswald of Northumbria by [Adams, Max]
Kindle App Ad

The King in the North: The Life and Times of Oswald of Northumbria Kindle Edition

4.0 out of 5 stars 108 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£5.03

Length: 464 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

40 Kindle Books for £1
Browse our selection of Kindle Books discounted to £1 each. Learn more
Get a £1 reward for movies or TV
Enjoy a £1.00 reward to spend on movies or TV on Amazon Video when you purchase any Amazon Kindle Book from the Kindle Store (excluding Kindle Unlimited, Periodicals and free Kindle Books) offered by Amazon.co.uk. A maximum of 1 reward per customer applies. UK customers only. Offer ends at 23:59 on Wednesday, September 27, 2017. Terms and conditions apply


Product description

Review

'A triumph. The most gripping portrait of 7th-Century Britain that I have read ... A Game of Thrones in the Dark Ages' Tom Holland, The Times.

'An engagingly populist and evocative book that makes a bold and effective attempt to bring a particularly obscure period in northern British history to the general reader' Literary Review.

'This early ruler had a life, and a legacy that rivals any fable' Independent.

'Gripping, hugely enjoyable and deeply scholarly.' History Today Books of the Year.

About the Author

Max Adams is the author of ADMIRAL COLLINGWOOD (2005) and THE PROMETHEANS (2009), which was a Guardian Book of the Week. A university teacher, Max has lived and worked in the North-East of England since 1993.


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 8307 KB
  • Print Length: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Head of Zeus (29 Aug. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00CGOD5K0
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 108 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #33,125 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  • Would you like to tell us about a lower price?


Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This tome is jam-packed full of interesting facts but it has taken me a month to read as I just couldn't get into it. It's probably not the fault of the book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Covering the life of Oswald, the context preceding him, and the period after his death at Maserfield when he came to be venerated as a saint, The King in the North is a lucid and compelling insight into 7th century England, Ireland and Scotland, and into the life of England's first biographable king.

Oswald was Bede's favourite, and continued to be one of the most important Anglo-Saxon saints right up to the time of Aelfric. In many ways, Max Adams's book is an extended commentary on Bede's account, elucidated by all of the contextual material that archaeology, history and contemporary literature can bring to bear. Adams carefully questions Bede. While he regards him as a serious and highly competent historian, he unpicks some of the cultural assumptions, and deconstructs Bede's own underlying theme of providence and God's reward for just kings.

Parts of this book are speculative and parts are strongly sourced, both textually and archaeologically. Adams is careful to let the reader know at all times where the information he is presenting is coming from, and spends ample time in interpreting his sources and questioning his own interpretations.

If this book has a fault, it is that it can -- at times -- be slightly florid and has a tendency to over-explain or even to repeat itself. Nonetheless, this is a highly readable and detailed account which brings together the latest materials, including the Staffordshire Hoard. Oswald could not have hoped for a better biographer.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Not a novel, but a serious study - very interesting and easy to read, have learned a lot from it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
An historical title and one that whilst I had heard of the subject (Oswald) was not one I knew too much about and to be honest in a culture where a lot of the heroes we get to read about are from invaders such as the Anglo Saxon's Beowulf, here we get the story of a home grown hero, a man who took his birthright, brought his kingdom under Christianity and won as well as lost his kingdom by the sword alongside having influence throughout the UK.

It's a tale that is an absolute epic on its own and deserving of the time to be brought to the fore. What Max does is sort out fact from fable, delves into the historical writings and brings this to the modern reader in a friendly as well as understandable manner. All round a great book and one that, whilst it took a while to get through, was one that I was more than happy I spent the time reading. Great stuff.
Comment 51 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
King of the North is supposed to be about “the life and times of Oswald of Northumbria”, as the book subtitle hints at. Written in an entertaining way and targeted at the general reader, this book is much more than that, with Oswald of Northumbria being almost a pretext for telling a much wider story over a much longer period than the mere eight years during which this warrior-king reigned. In a way, this is just as well, given how little real historical information we can really rely upon.

This is perhaps the first merit because the author, who clearly knows his topic and has done his research, manages to tell the story of most of Anglo-Saxon England over a period of about four centuries, with a special focus on its northern parts, while still being able to link this to Oswald. Part of this is achieved through the pretext of providing necessary context while events subsequent to the warrior-King’s death are also described as part of the King’s legacy or as part of the growth of his legend.

Another interesting feature is the provision of chronologies for each of the book’s major sections. While these may be tentative than the author cares to admit, and also largely reflects his assumptions, choices or even educated guesses in some cases, there is no denying how helpful they are for the reader who would very likely be confused or even lost in their absence.

A third focus and strong point of this book, although there are many others as well that I will be unable to mention in this limited review, is the emphasis put on the King or, perhaps more accurately, the paramount warlord. The author clearly shows to what extent the king’s power was essentially personal.
Read more ›
Comment 27 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
vg
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
This is a very readable book that focusses on Northern Britain in the seventh century AD. It describes, through looking at King Oswald the culture, religion and life in that time. The author draws illuminating parallels with later historical events and discusses differences in religion, language between various realms as well as transport problems. I did not know much about the subject of the book when I started reading but I learnt much about this shadowy time between the classical pagan world and the early medieval world.
Well written and recommended.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Good read - recommend
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

click to open popover