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Comment: Expedited shipping available on this book. The book has been read, but is in excellent condition. Pages are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine remains undamaged.
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The Killing Fields (Pan original) Paperback – 9 Nov 1984

4.2 out of 5 stars 10 customer reviews

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Paperback, 9 Nov 1984
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Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Pan Books (9 Nov. 1984)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0330285130
  • ISBN-13: 978-0330285131
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 10.9 x 2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 117,122 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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4.2 out of 5 stars
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have just watched the dvd of this and was so pleased I had read the book first. It goes into a lot more detail than the film and is a lot more evocative.
I was deeply moved by the relationship between the two main characters and horrified by the Khmer Rouge. I believe this book should be read by more people, perhaps students, it was a time that was brushed under the carpet. I was in my early twenties when this happened and that era was really unaware of what was happening around the world.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
There's a bit in a Woody Allen film (Annie Hall, if memory serves correctly) where Allen's character has a minor rant about novelisations of movies, asking why on earth would anyone ever want to make a novel of a film. Well, I think this novelisation of The Killing Fields provides a very good example of why you might want to. The movie itself won awards for its portrayal of events in Cambodia, and as the director said, it does this by not putting a literal documentary version of events on the screen, but trying to portray "what it felt like". That means you see a great many scenes and images where you don't really know who people are, or what exactly is going on, but you see the situations and the character's reactions and you can empathise. However the book takes all this and fleshes it out with all the detail and background that the film dispensed with. Having read it, I honestly feel like I barely knew what I was watching when I saw the movie! Know I know who the characters are, when and where the events were taking place. It doesn't come with the emotional impact of the pictures and acting and music, but it adds a lot to my understanding. Well worth £1.20 anyway :)
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By John P. Jones III TOP 500 REVIEWER on 18 May 2011
Format: Paperback
There have been numerous genocides throughout history; several have occurred in the 20th Century: the Jewish, Armenian, Rwandan ones immediately come to mind. What occurred in Cambodia in the second half of the `70's were devastating mass killings of the Cambodian people, but this event does not easily fit into the normal pattern of genocide, that is, the massive killing of one ethnic group by another. Rather, it was initially based on education level, and then seemed to metastasize into an orgy of killing for killing's sake. The rather clunky compound word that is the subject title was invented in an attempt to give a short-hand description to this unique event, certainly for the 20th Century.

While other genocides have been more carefully documented and examined, the one in Cambodia has been largely ignored. No doubt the fact that both the United States and China continued to recognize the Khmer Rouge as the "legitimate government" of Cambodia, long after irrefutable evidence of this genocide was available, is part of the reason. Around two million people, one third of Cambodia's population, died during the late `70's. And I still recall the remark of a friend who worked in the Peace Corps in Thailand during the `60's, and who visited Cambodia, pre-war: "I found the Cambodians the gentlest people on earth." The how and the why of this enormous tragedy have never been fully answered.

Hudson's book takes the form of a "docudrama"; a re-creation of events based on the known facts. He draws on one of the few other excellent sources then available: William Shawcross, author of
...Read more ›
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Format: Paperback
Always wanted to read this, a great book, it makes you realise how evil man can become without even realising it especially when an ideoligally is involved. It also gives you a good view of the political positions major countries were taking up at that time
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very gripping and a crucial read for anyone interested not just in the history of Cambodia but who wants an insight into the people and this terrible episode in their history. Gives political and personal insight.
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