• RRP: £9.99
  • You Save: £0.01
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Kill Call (Cooper and... has been added to your Basket
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Kill Call (Cooper and Fry Crime Series, Book 9) Paperback – 1 Apr 2010

4.1 out of 5 stars 69 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 1 Apr 2010
£9.98
£2.98 £0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
£4.95
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£9.98 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Read an extract from The Kill Call by Stephen Booth [pdf].



Frequently Bought Together

  • The Kill Call (Cooper and Fry Crime Series, Book 9)
  • +
  • Lost River (Cooper and Fry Crime Series, Book 10)
  • +
  • Dying to Sin (Cooper and Fry Crime Series, Book 8)
Total price: £27.96
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 544 pages
  • Publisher: Harper (1 April 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0007243472
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007243471
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 3.5 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (69 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 124,537 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Praise for The Kill Call:

‘Informative and clever’ Literary Review

‘Plenty to get your teeth into here… adds an extra edge of darkness to an already twilight tale’ Northern Echo

Praise for Dying to Sin:

‘Clever, intricate plot… Cooper is an ascendant Lewis to Fry’s lonely, bitter Morse in this… gripping procedural’ Financial Times

Praise for Scared to Live:

'It's easy to see why Stephen Booth's novels are so popular. The Peak District's awesome scenery is an ideal background for a murder or two; he has developed his two principal characters into rounded personalities and he always gives them an intriguing mystery to investigate' Sunday Telegraph

'A modern master of rural noir' Guardian

'Booth's aim is to portray the darkness that lies below the surface… in this he succeeds wonderfully well' Daily Mail

'Ingenious plotting and richly atmospheric' Reginald Hill

Praise for Stephen Booth:

'Stephen Booth creates a fine sense of place and atmosphere … the unguessable solution to the crime comes as a real surprise' Sunday Telegraph

'The complex relationship between [Cooper and Fry] is excellently drawn, and is combined with an intriguing plot and a real sense of place: Stephen Booth is an author to keep an eye on' Evening Standard

'Stephen Booth makes high summer in Derbyshire as dark and terrifying as midwinter' Val McDermid

'Sinks its teeth into you and doesn't let go … A dark star may be born!' Reginald Hill

'A leading light of British crime writing' Guardian

From the Author

One strand of the story is set in 1968, but one character describes it as being ‘more like the Fifties’ in Derbyshire. Does that sense of anachronism still exist?
Yes, in certain areas. But I think this is true of all the remoter parts of Britain. I’ve personally visited places where I felt as though I was stepping back in time by a good 10 or 20 years. And this isn’t necessarily a bad thing! I love places which are able to retain their unique character, despite the arrival of the 21st Century. The Peak District still has lots of those.

To what extent do you think the current events of the 60s, such as the Cold War, informed the local mindset then?
Living through the 1960s was a very odd experience, in retrospect. It’s strange how we only seem to remember the music and the fashions, and all the things that went with them. In fact, for most of the country, Carnaby Street was a remote and alien concept. When I look back at my childhood, growing up in the 60s, one of the things I remember most is that we lived with the expectation of a Third World War starting at any moment. We all knew about the four-minute warning of a nuclear attack. At school, a common topic of discussion was what we do during those last four minutes before the bombs hit. So I was interested in exploring the idea of how that awareness could affect the way people lived their lives.

In the series, you draw upon the differences between attitudes in the city and the country. How did you decide to explore this with the emotive issue of hunting?
Given the area in which the Cooper & Fry series is set, it was inevitable that I’d tackle the issue of fox hunting at some stage. People who live in the countryside often have ambivalent attitudes to hunting, and Ben Cooper’s approach represents this conflict. Diane Fry, on the other hand, has no knowledge of hunting and her views are founded on ignorance. I was intrigued by the fact that active support for hunting has increased dramatically since the anti-hunting legislation was introduced a few years ago. That shows us something about country people, doesn’t it? They don’t like being told what to do!

Diane Fry keeps using the wrong words (e.g. ‘dogs’ when the locals say ‘hounds) so it’s obvious she’s from somewhere else. But can an outsider ever fit into such a tight-knit community, even if they wanted to?
No. In a really tight-knit community, you’re always an outsider until your family has lived there for generations. Of course, there are fewer and fewer communities now which are quite so insular. But in Britain you don’t have to do much to be regarded as an outsider. When I was a child, my family moved just 30 miles from one part of Lancashire to another, and all the kids made fun of me because my accent was so different! Diane is not only a city girl, she’s from the Black Country, so she marks herself out as soon as she opens her mouth. She will always be an outsider, and that’s why I like her as a character.

What drew you to use the village of Eyam as a key setting?
I love to use some aspect of the Peak District’s history in my books, and the story of the Eyam ‘plague village’ is one of the best known. It’s a very atmospheric place in its own right, especially when you stand in the main street and look at the plaques outside the cottages with the names of the plague victims listed on them. One Eyam woman had to bury her entire family with her own hands during that period. Anyone with an ounce of imagination can’t escape being affected by such stories.

‘One man’s pet is another man’s protein,’ says the suspect who’s supplying horse meat. An acceptable view?
Well, he’s right of course, in pointing out that horse meat is very healthy, with half the fat of beef and ten times the Omega Threes to reduce your cholesterol level. It’s also free from bird ’flu, mad cow disease, tuberculosis, Foot and Mouth… From a practical point of view, what’s not to like? Lots of countries in Europe eat horse meat, yet most of us here in the UK find the idea unacceptable. In the USA, they’re even more anti. And let’s not even mention eating dogs... At the same time, we happily consume cows and pigs, which in other parts of the world are taboo. It’s entirely cultural, isn’t it?

Did the inspiration for this book come from the idea of the kill call itself, and its double meaning?
As with many of my books, it was a coming together of several apparently unrelated subjects – in this case, those subjects were hunting, the plague village, and the legacy of the Cold War. The concept of the kill call formed the link between them and gave me the direction of the story. It’s one of those irresistible synchronicities that the kill call consists of three long notes on a hunting horn, while the warning of imminent nuclear fallout is three bursts of a maroon. It’s true that everything comes in threes… -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

See all Product Description


Related Media

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
his must be about the eighth of Stephen Booth's Derbyshire police procedural thrillers, set in the sometimes bleak, often lovely Peak District. His two well-known protagonists are Detective-Sergeant Diane Fry and DC Ben Cooper based in the fictional town of Edendale.
This story contains several very different themes, fox-hunting and the saboteurs, illegal horse trading for meat and oddly, the former Royal Observer Corps.
A man is found near an old abandoned building on the moor, dead from head injuries and after a search for his identity, is found to be a shady character who is known to be involved in buying horses, most of whom end up in the abattoir. The plot is complex and the characters numerous, but as always, all is eventually explained. There are some disturbing facts about the horse-meat exporting trade, which seems to be burgeoning on the continent - as well as some graphic descriptions of horse-slaughtering.
I always look forward to a Booth novel, especially as he is such a good writer, particularly in evoking the feel of the countryside. I have to say that this is not one of his best, as it was very slow going for at least the first half and I found the endless antipathy between the miserable Fry and the solicitous Cooper becoming a bit of a drag, especially as the root cause of their eternal feud never really gets explained. However, it remained a good read, even though it seems somewhat unrealistic for a multiple suspicious death investigation to be largely handled by a mere sergeant, with only the occasional languid appearance of her DI. In a case like this, DCIs and Supers would be crawling out of the woodwork!

Bernard Knight ex Home Office Pathologist and author of the highly acclaimed Crowner John series
Comment 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Oh how I love the Cooper and Fry series. Stephen Booth is a gifted storyteller. I thoroughly enjoyed "The Kill Call". It had a great storyline and the historical aspects, especially the story of the Plague Village, were very interesting. Booth's scene setting is so good I felt like I had been transported to the Peak District. I would recommend this book, and it's predecessors to anyone who is a fan of police procedurals.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I have been a fan of Stephen Booth ever since I read his first novel and I have collected every book he has written since, the kill call is the best one yet and with each book he has improved every time. I would recomend his biiks to anyone who likes British crime novels.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I CAME ACCROSS STEPHEN BOTH A FEW YEARS BACK, STARTED TO READ HIS FRY AND COOPER BOOKS AND GOT TOTALLY HOOKED. HE MANAGES TO COMBINE REALLY GOOD DETECTIVE STORIES WITH AN ATMOSPHERIC MENACE OF THE SURROUNDINGS, MOSTLY SET IN THE PEAK DISTRICT WITH FORRAYS INTO THE MIDLANDS AND BIRMINGHAM, BLOODY MARVELOUS
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
An amazing book! Even if you aren't familiar with the Peak District this, and the author's earlier books, will whet your appetite to find out more about it. I now intend to visit all the places Booth mentions in his books to see them for myself. A fascinating and motivating book!
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
An interesting view of an investigation of a death that links to another unrelated death. It's all the more interesting in that we get to see the thoughts of two characters in particular. One is struggling with the aftermath of an event in their recent past. The other is wondering about where their life is going and the possibilities of promotion. Gathers momentum we'll and completes the investigation even if we don't know what happens to our heros
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Another winner from Stephen Booth, as I've said before Stephen is excellent at describing things and as you read you feel as you are there. Ladybower Dam was described very well.

The relationship between Cooper and Fry has always in my view been a bit difficult, she is rather dominant where Cooper is very laid back. Having said that though if Diane Fry looks to be in difficulties she seems to ask Ben first off rather like a shoulder to cry on metaphorically.

Gavin Murfin I think is a jolly character, come day go day and he certainly likes his cakes, also good banter between the police teams.

Looking forward to reading LOST RIVER, its bound to be another winner.

Well done Stephen all the best.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book was lenity to me by a friend as I live locally to where the story takes place. I gave it to another friend who is very academic and not used at all to that kind of books but he loved it. So well worth it !
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Feedback