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The Jury (Paul Madriani Novels (Audio)) Audio CD – Abridged, Audiobook

4.5 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster; Abridged edition (1 Aug. 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0743517946
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743517942
  • Product Dimensions: 14.5 x 2.5 x 12.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 4,291,561 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Amazon Review

So much of the action in Steve Martini's courtroom thriller The Jury happens outside the jury's purview that it makes one wonder if there's a touch of irony intended in the title. Paul Madriani, the lawyer-hero of five previous Martini novels set in San Francisco, has moved to San Diego for reasons that are never made clear. He's taken on the case of David Crone, a doctor involved in mapping the human genome, who's been charged with the murder of his colleague, a young African American research physician whose ambitions threatened Crone's career.

Crone seems to have had ample motivation for killing Kalista Jordan: witnesses have testified to the friction between them, and Crone himself seems less concerned about the capital murder charge than about what may be going on in his lab. When a key witness for the prosecution dies in what looks like a suicide and leaves a note confessing to the murder, Crone is freed. And in an O Henry-like twist in the last chapter, a most unlikely killer emerges and threatens Madriani's life.

But even this doesn't do much to enliven this slow-moving novel. There's very little tension on the page or in the plot, and neither the narrative nor the characters offer the reader the kind of excitement found in Martini's previous novels. --Jane Adams, Amazon.com --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

Aug 01 - large print rights sold to Thorpe for flat fee of £2500, payable half on signature agreement and half on public. Of large print edition. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I've read all of Martini's books and they are all very good, but this one doesn't seem to match with his usual high standards. Its an alright read, with Attorney Madriani and Harry Hinds once again defending the probably guilty with a few twists and a suprising ending. Too short for my comfort though and we start with the court case already in session. Seems strangely rushed but certainly worth a read. If you are new to Steve Martini however try 'the judge' or 'The attorney' first.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Value for money and speedy delivery
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very good
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Format: Perfect Paperback
all ok
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars 111 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Poorly titled. Or is it? 1 Nov. 2013
By K.C. Sierra - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I've been reading the Paul Madriani series in order for the last couple of months. They're all "very good," worth the time you put into them. They have a few flaws (I'm convinced after getting this far that Steve Martini does not know what "begging the question" means -- he uses the term incorrectly all the time. It gets old. Most people use the term incorrectly, but I would expect lawyers to get it right. Not in Martini's books, though).
My main issue with this book is that its title is misleading. This book is not about the jury. You learn almost nothing about the jury. Is Martini trying to say that the actual jury doesn't matter? Is he saying that the REAL jury consists of the participants and observers of a trial, those who are affected by the crime and the outcome of the trial? Are the lawyers the real jury? Is the judge? Is it the people who are affected by the defendant's incarceration, or the defendant's employer? Is it some mix of all of these? If that's what Martini is trying to get across, he does not do a very good job of it.
Those quibbles aside, it was gratifying to read a novel like this in which the courtroom action starts right at the beginning. After a depiction of the murder, we join the action during the actual murder trial. None of the endless run-up to trial that sometimes bogs down novels like this. The added reward is that we don't need an explanation of why the trial i staking place so soon after the crime (Martini had two defendants demand a right to a speedy trial in previous novels, a plot contrivance that might work once but seems especially unusual in murder cases in real life).
By all means, this is a good legal thriller that engages you from the start and maintains your interest throughout. Well worth it.
5.0 out of 5 stars Best in show 28 April 2017
By Patrick D. Parker - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This was by far the best book in the series so far! Again, I thought the start was slow, but the pace really picked up and turned into another page turner.
2.0 out of 5 stars Two Stars 5 May 2017
By Joseph - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Not read yet
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars 23 April 2017
By John Mig - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Awesome
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting 15 April 2017
By Curtis - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
So I could escape from this Amazonpage. But I still have to add 13 words. Five more words. Good writer,but courtroom better than terrier stuf.
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