Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £5.49

Save £6.50 (54%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Jumper by [Gould, Steven]
Kindle App Ad

Jumper Kindle Edition

4.5 out of 5 stars 57 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£5.49
Library Binding
"Please retry"
£12.08

Kindle Books from 99p
Load up your Kindle library before your next holiday -- browse over 500 Kindle Books on sale from 99p until 31 August, 2016. Shop now

Product Description

Review

Praise for Steven Gould

"Jumper was one of the great sf novels of the 1990s--one of those rare books that can be read either as a young adult novel or a book for adults, like "Ender's Game" or vintage Heinlein. [...] Now there's a sequel to "Jumper", called "Reflex", and last night I ended up burning about two hours' worth of jealously hoarded sleep-time to finish this thing. [...] This kind of book doesn't come along all that often, and when it does, it's cause for celebration--run, don't walk."--Cory Doctorow

"Gould proves once again that in the hands of a wonderful, perceptive writer, there is no such thing as an old idea. What sets "Jumper" apart from other novels that dip back into the well of the masters is that Gould brings his own keen empathy and rigorous intelligence to the story, exploring what the ability to 'jump' means in the life of this particular young man.... This is a book that you won't want to miss. It reminded me of why I first came to love science fiction, and yet I didn't have to be twelve again to have a great time reading it."--Orson Scott Card

""Jumper" is very good indeed... in its concept and execution it harks back to a time in SF which could probably teach any of the new writers a thing or two about simplicity--of concept and execution.... All in all a very satisfying novel that answers for you the age old question, 'What if I could...?'"--"Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine"

Praise for Steven Gould
"Jumper was one of the great sf novels of the 1990s--one of those rare books that can be read either as a young adult novel or a book for adults, like "Ender's Game" or vintage Heinlein. [...] Now there's a sequel to "Jumper," called "Reflex," and last night I ended up burning about two hours' worth of jealously hoarded sleep-time to finish this thing. [...] This kind of book doesn't come along all that often, and when it does, it's cause for celebration--run, don't walk."--Cory Doctorow
"Gould proves once again that in the hands of a wonderful, perceptive writer, there is no such thing as an old idea. What sets "Jumper" apart from other novels that dip back into the well of the masters is that Gould brings his own keen empathy and rigorous intelligence to the story, exploring what the ability to 'jump' means in the life of this particular young man.... This is a book that you won't want to miss. It reminded me of why I first came to love science fiction, and yet I didn't have to be twelve again to have a great time reading it."--Orson Scott Card
""Jumper" is very good indeed... in its concept and execution it harks back to a time in SF which could probably teach any of the new writers a thing or two about simplicity--of concept and execution.... All in all a very satisfying novel that answers for you the age old question, 'What if I could...?'"--"Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine"

"Jumper was one of the great sf novels of the 1990s--one of those rare books that can be read either as a young adult novel or a book for adults, like "Ender's Game" or vintage Heinlein. [...] Now there's a sequel to "Jumper," called "Reflex," and last night I ended up burning about two hours' worth of jealously hoarded sleep-time to finish this thing. [...] This kind of book doesn't come along all that often, and when it does, it's cause for celebration--run, don't walk."--Cory Doctorow
"Gould proves once again that in the hands of a wonderful, perceptive writer, there is no such thing as an old idea. What sets "Jumper" apart from other novels that dip back into the well of the masters is that Gould brings his own keen empathy and rigorous intelligence to the story, exploring what the ability to 'jump' means in the life of this particular young man.... This is a book that you won't want to miss. It reminded me of why I first came to love science fiction, and yet I didn't have to be twelve again to have a great time reading it."--Orson Scott Card
""Jumper" is very good indeed... in its concept and execution it harks back to a time in SF which could probably teach any of the new writers a thing or two about simplicity--of concept and execution.... All in all a very satisfying novel that answers for you the age old question, 'What if I could...?'"--"Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine"

Jumper was one of the great sf novels of the 1990s--one of those rare books that can be read either as a young adult novel or a book for adults, like "Ender's Game" or vintage Heinlein. [ ] Now there's a sequel to "Jumper," called "Reflex," and last night I ended up burning about two hours' worth of jealously hoarded sleep-time to finish this thing. [ ] This kind of book doesn't come along all that often, and when it does, it's cause for celebration--run, don't walk. "Cory Doctorow"

Gould proves once again that in the hands of a wonderful, perceptive writer, there is no such thing as an old idea. What sets "Jumper" apart from other novels that dip back into the well of the masters is that Gould brings his own keen empathy and rigorous intelligence to the story, exploring what the ability to jump' means in the life of this particular young man . This is a book that you won't want to miss. It reminded me of why I first came to love science fiction, and yet I didn't have to be twelve again to have a great time reading it. "Orson Scott Card"

"Jumper" is very good indeed... in its concept and execution it harks back to a time in SF which could probably teach any of the new writers a thing or two about simplicity--of concept and execution.... All in all a very satisfying novel that answers for you the age old question, What if I could...?' "Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine""

Synopsis

Written in the 1990s by American author Steven Gould, Jumper is the inspiration for the film of the same name -- to be released in Feb 08 and starring Samuel L Jackson. It tells the story of Davy Rice, played by Hayden Christensen, as he escapes his tortured childhood to explore the world via teleportation and find his long lost mother. At seventeen the world is at your feet! especially if you can teleport. David Rice barely remembers his mother. She left his alcoholic father when Davy was very young. She left Davy too, and since then all of William Rice's abusive anger has been focused on his young teenage son. One evening, as he is about to receive another brutal beating, Davy shuts his eyes and wishes to be safe. When he opens them again, he finds himself in his small town's library. Slowly, he realises he is very special, he can teleport. Armed with his new power, Davy sets out with new purpose: he will leave his abusive home and find his long lost mother. Davy's confidence grows as his skills do, but they also draw unwanted attention and soon Davy finds that he too is hunted./ Requires ePub-compatible e-book reader with ADEPT DRM (eg Sony Reader hardware or Adobe Digital Editions software), and internet connection to purchase

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 773 KB
  • Print Length: 355 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Voyager; Film tie-in ed edition (4 Sept. 2008)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B002UZ5JAO
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 57 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #34,675 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I like to have a rule with regards to books that have been made into films: read the book first. This is largely down to the fact that almost always the book is significantly superior to the film, which is certainly the case with Jumper. In fact there are so many differences between the novel and the film that they bare only the slightest resemblance to each other. I hope that this has convinced you to try and read the book.

The novel is based around the life of Davy Rice, a teenager who discovers that he has the ability to teleport or `jump' instantaneously from place to place. This serves as the catalyst to run away from his abusive drunken father and to begin a life of his own, a life that he soon realises is not bound by the limitations that other people might experience.

The novel, though obviously supernatural in its foundations, is very much about growing up. At the beginning of the novel Davy is a shy and nervous adolescent who lives in constant fear of his overbearing father, the novel shows his journey into becoming a mature and responsible adult. What I liked about the story is that it shows very honestly what most people would do with the ability to come and go as they please, anywhere in the world, the novel shows very easily the freedom that he so effortlessly possesses.

This book contains a heart that the film sadly did not possess; the film seemed to paint Davy as a very self-obsessed loner, whereas the book shows his real motivations and that he is in fact an intelligent and emotional young man. As one reviewer has commented this book is listed somewhere as "young adult fiction", which I think can only be down to the fact that the subject matter does involve a good deal of wish fulfillment. A superb piece of writing to be sure, my one and only reason for not giving the book the coveted five star rating is the fact that I thought the ending was a tiny bit abrupt. Otherwise a wonderful piece of science-fiction.
Comment 28 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is an excellent book. I bought it because I saw the trailer for the movie and thought: "what a good idea, but I bet they've overdone the special effects at the expense of the story". So I thought I'd read the book first. I didn't realise that this book is not the story of the movie, but I enjoyed this so much that I probably will read 'Jumper: Griffin's Story' as well. I still haven't seen the movie and don't think I'll bother. The beauty of this story is not the imagery of moving instantly from place to place, but the moral dilemas the main character, Davy Rice, faces as a result of his ability. Is it acceptable to rob a bank so long as no one gets hurt? To convince someone they're going insane because they treated you badly in the past? To dispense justice to terrorists just because you can? There are many, many interesting questions and issues raised in this book.

But my word of warning is this: the movie is 12A and this book was (at one point, if not now) listed in a 'Young Adult' category. I would say this book really isn't appropriate for younger readers. There are some very dark themes: physical and mental child abuse, alcoholism, domestic violence, terrorist violence and homelessness to name a few. Admittedly there's no graphic sex or much in the way of swearing, but I would still strongly suggest that any parent thinking of buying this book for their child after seeing the film read it first, because it may not be suitable.
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I loved this one. The idea of a person being able to teleport from place to place is not new, but it still has the power to fascinate. Just think, what would you do if you could jump from one side of the world to another just by concentrating upon a photograph of your destination?

David Rice can do just that as he learns quite by accident during a moment of heightened stress when his abusive father attacks him. We follow David as he learns what he can do, but not why he can do it. This frustrates him until he becomes distracted by other events. He robs a bank, gets a girlfriend older than him, finds his estranged mother, loses the girl, loses the mother, gets the girl again, tracks down a bunch of terrorists.... phew! David sure is busy in this book and I love it! Oh yeah, he makes a fool out of the FBI and police at nearly every turn... great!

Jumper is simply great fun. Once you pick it up, you'll not want to put it down until the last page is read. When you've finished it, you'll want to put it somewhere safe. I guarantee you'll want to read it again.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By lawyeraau HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 29 Sept. 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
David Rice is a highly intelligent, well read, seventeen year old boy, who has been physically and verbally abused by his father for years. Abandoned by his mother, Mary, when he was twelve, because David's father, her husband, also battered her, David decides that he cannot take any more abuse. In a moment of great personal angst, he discovers that he can teleport himself to a safe place. So, begins a new life for David and a most excellent adventure for the reader.
David, to his own amazement, can teleport, but there there is a method to the madness, which he soon discovers. His new ability, however, enables him to not have to return home. He, instead, starts a new life for himself, one which the reader will enjoy sharing, as his new found ability, which he calls "jumping", leads to many interesting situations. Some of the situations in which he gets involved turn him into an unusual sort of super hero. Inventive and absorbing, this is a very special coming of age story that will keep the reader turning the pages.
The only problem with the book is that many of David's initial problems, while on his own, arise out of his lack of a social security number. This is a highly unlikely case scenario, because David would have needed a social security number for some of the standardized tests a student is required to take, as the social security number would act as the student's identification number. Moreover, his father would have needed David's social security number in order to claim him as a deduction on his income tax return. This is, however, the only false note in this otherwise totally delightful tale of a young man with powers of teleportation and the ways in which he puts his ability to use.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

click to open popover