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Juliet, Naked by [Hornby, Nick]
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Juliet, Naked Kindle Edition

3.4 out of 5 stars 112 customer reviews

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Length: 418 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Review

Charming Nobody captures the zealous devotion and bizarre intensity of amateur music snobs better. The Washington Post
Hornby seems, as ever, fascinated by the power of music to guide the heart, and in this very funny, very charming novel, he makes you see it matters. The New York Times Book Review
"Rich and perceptive." --The Wall Street Journal"

"Charming... Nobody captures the zealous devotion and bizarre intensity of amateur music snobs better." --The Washington Post
"Hornby seems, as ever, fascinated by the power of music to guide the heart, and in this very funny, very charming novel, he makes you see it matters." --The New York Times Book Review
"Rich and perceptive." --The Wall Street Journal

Review

Hornby writes with a funny, fresh voice which skewers male and female foibles with hilarious accuracy Guardian He should write for England Observer Hornby is a fine writer, swift and pointed, with a lighter, more mischievous heart than he lets on, and more sympathy for the devil than he admits to New York Magazine

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1869 KB
  • Print Length: 418 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin (3 Sept. 2009)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B002RI9A4U
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars 112 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #89,937 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great book and good condition
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Format: Kindle Edition
I have read almost all the books by Nick Hornby. I find him somewhat ingenious. He is able of taking some (almost) normal characters in ordinary settings and pull out some stories that you would not have thought in any way. His is a fantasy that moves outside the box. The situations he tells are unusual but plausible. His characters are alive in our minds. And they all make us laugh, sometimes to tears, for the things they do or say.
Again in "Juliet, Naked" Hornby brings out the best of himself. He tells the story of a forgotten rock star and of the companion of one of his few remaining fans (bordering on obsession). Two distant characters, not only geographically, that thanks to the internet come into contact.
The character of the former rocker Tucker is so well built, complete with a page of Wikipedia, that you almost have the doubt that a famous musician by that name really existed in the 80s. Despite the objective absurdity of the story, due to an excess of unusual events and characters, the suspension of disbelief is total.
Yet even this novel by Hornby, as almost all of them, seems to get lost in the end. After having exceeded without scruples throughout the book, he cannot dare in closing it. Unlike other novels in which he fell into a feel-good ending, where the characters return to normal, after the madness of the story, here the author indulges in an open ending. This in itself would not be bad at all. I love open endings, the problem with this though is that Hornby did not even try to give a true indication of the direction to which, probably, the situation will evolve. Except maybe once again a foregone conclusion, as what happened during the novel doesn't matter at all.
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By SilentSinger VINE VOICE on 2 Feb. 2010
Format: Paperback
Nick Hornby's latest novel in my esteemed opinion is a return to form after the fiasco of 'A Long Way Down' which I couldn't even penetrate the first few chapters. The plot of this book centres around the relationship of Annie and Duncan who've been partners for the last fifteen years by habit rather than love. They reside in the fictional Northern seaside town of Gooleness where Annie works as a museum curator and Duncan a lecturer at a local college, Duncan's obsession with the retired singer-songwriter Tucker Crowe seeks to undermine their relationship when Duncan disagrees with Annie's review of the stripped down 'naked' version of Tucker's revered album 'Juliet.'

Although you can spot the traditional Hornby narrative trademarks - i.e. strained relationships and blokish obesssions with music it didn't really detract from my enjoyment of this novel although I did find that all of the characters' internal voices seemed more male than female at times. I also liked the sly dig at internet fora/chat rooms etc and the upshot of all of this was that although the internet can be a wonderful thing it can bring together rather obsessive people at times (hark at me writing on Amazon!) The only thing which let it down slightly was the ambiguous ending, but otherwise a good read.
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Format: Paperback
Nick Hornby's latest novel involves a subtle, bare plot, and employs his usual conversational writing style, which inevitably leads to him not being given the recognition he so deserves by the literary establishment. `Juliet Naked' is a cleverly observed study of fortysomething male obsession with music and fandom - which is fuelled by the power of the internet to link similarly obsessed people (mainly men) across the world, and to therefore sustain and fan the flames of their obsession long after they should have died out. It is also bitingly accurate about the inability of some of the male species to create and sustain meaningful relationships.

Duncan and Annie have one such unhealthy 15 year relationship. The boredom and inertia of their lives in the bleak east coast town of Gooleness positively seeps from the pages. Annie works in a local museum where the event of the decade was a shark washed up on a local beach that she is now curating an exhibition to commemorate. So people there clearly need to get out more. And Annie has had to share her man with another, the American singer songwriter turned reclusive wild man Tucker Crowe. We join the couple on holiday in America making an inevitable pilgrimage to the site of Tucker's mysterious disappearance from the music scene followed an alleged incident in a toilet. Duncan is obsessed with all things related to Tucker, and spends most of his time and energy discussing the minutiae of his life (or actually what his fans think his life is - as they don't actually know anything about him since he disappeared from view).
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By A. Ross TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 14 Oct. 2009
Format: Hardcover
Obviously there's deep irony in posting a review of a new book by one of my favorite authors when one of the key elements of the book's plot is an adoring fan's online review of a new album...but oh well. I have to admit, I was a little leery when I cracked the spine of Hornby's latest novel. After setting the bar ridiculously high with his first two books, Fever Pitch and High Fidelity, Hornby has continued on to produce a series of engaging, but not quite as brilliant successors. And it had to be said that his last adult novel, A Long Way Down, was distinctly underwhelming. Fortunately, this new book represents a return to form, as well as being a work that speaks to an older (though probably not wiser) audience than his previous work.

The mechanics of the story are relatively simple: Annie and Duncan are a cohabitating couple approaching 40 as they eke out moderate existences as a small museum director and college instructor, respectively. They've been together for 15 years, and about the only thing keeping them together is inertia and the lack of prospects in the seaside cultural wasteland they live in (a fictional town on England's eastern coast, somewhere near Hull -- roughly the American equivalent of a small, tacky, Jersey shore town). Duncan is obsessed with an obscure American singer-songwriter from the '80s who inexplicably walked away from music one day, and spends a great deal of his time and energy running a website devoted to the mysterious Tucker Crowe. One day, a "new" Tucker Crowe album is released (it's actually the demos from a concept album beloved by his fans), and Duncan and Annie's differing reactions to it trigger a chain of events which brings the reclusive ex-musician into their lives in the flesh.
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