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Judgement Night: A Selection of Science Fiction (S.F. MASTERWORKS) by [Moore, C.L.]
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Judgement Night: A Selection of Science Fiction (S.F. MASTERWORKS) Kindle Edition

4.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Kindle Edition, 29 Sep 2011
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Length: 380 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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From the Publisher

Four different worlds. Five different tales of conflict and discovery. All of them the unique visions of science fiction master C.L. Moore, presented here in her first published book -- Judgment Night.

Released in 1952 from Gnome Press, Judgment Night collects five Moore novellas from the pages of editor John W. Campbell, Jr.'s Astounding Science Fiction magazine. Chosen by the author herself as the best of her longer-form writing, these stories show a gifted wordsmith working at the height of her talents: ''Judgment Night'' (first published in August and September, 1943) balances a lush rendering of a future galactic empire with a sober meditation on the nature of power and its inevitable loss; ''The Code'' (July, 1945) pays homage to the classic Faust with modern theories and Lovecraftian dread; ''Promised Land'' (February, 1950) and ''Heir Apparent'' (July, 1950) both document the grim twisting that mankind must undergo in order to spread into the solar system; and ''Paradise Street'' (September, 1950) shows a futuristic take on the old western conflict between lone hunter and wilderness-taming settlers.

Except for ''Judgment Night,'' all of these pieces were originally published under the pen name Lawrence O'Donnell. Moore's marriage to fellow author Henry Kuttner yielded both a prodigious amount of collaborative writing and a bewildering variety of pen names. However, it is known that -- with a few recognized exceptions -- the O'Donnell name was used for work that Moore wrote with a minimum of collaboration (if any), and this is reflected in the sole author's credit that graces this collection.


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1607 KB
  • Print Length: 380 pages
  • Publisher: Gateway (29 Sept. 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B005LB9HFW
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,671,987 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Format: Hardcover
This Red Jacket Press edition is a reprint of the 1952 Gnome Press collection of 5 C.L. Moore novellas and short stories. It is slipcased, and is a beautiful reproduction of the original, right down to the back cover listing of other Gnome Press books - go click on "Look inside" and you'll see what I mean. So the while the physical book itself is a work of art, how do the contents hold up to actually read?

Moore was most famous for her creations Jirel of Joiry and Northwest Smith, and there are echoes of both those characters in places here. A sci-fi version of Jirel is pretty clearly showing through the lines of Princess Juille in Judgment Night - both are warrior-women with a hidden feminine side, fierce in defence of their realm, even to the extent of plotting murder of an emissary under a flag of truce! Juille is fighting a final, losing war against barbarians - in between skipping off to a pleasure moon for a few days to explore her feminine side. There is romance, battle, betrayal and abduction, all on spectacularly drawn worlds. This is full of action, with a surprising and satisfying twist at the end that changes all that you have read.

The other stories are all shorter, and show Moore's range. "Paradise Street" is a sci-fi western, which reads like Moore was channeling Leigh Brackett, at least until you realise she is in fact giving us an older and more hardbitten version of her own Northwest Smith. Jaime Morgan is a man on the edges of civilisation, on a planet that is now becoming civilised, perhaps the last of his type. Themes of freedom, civilisation and corruption all shine brightly, and if you liked Firefly and Serenity, you'll enjoy reading this.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.7 out of 5 stars 3 reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Just like time travel 2 April 2017
By G. Nicholas - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
this is a fantastic re-issue from Red Jacket Press. It really is just like getting the original Gnome press edition--but better, thanks to the slipcase. Great job.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful reproduction of a classic work 28 Jun. 2011
By Manly Reading - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This Red Jacket Press edition is a reprint of the 1952 Gnome Press collection of 5 C.L. Moore novellas and short stories. It is slipcased, and is a beautiful reproduction of the original, right down to the back cover listing of other Gnome Press books - go click on "Look inside" and you'll see what I mean. So while the physical book itself is a work of art, how do the contents hold up to actually read?

Moore was most famous for her creations Jirel of Joiry and Northwest Smith, and there are echoes of both those characters in places here. A sci-fi version of Jirel is pretty clearly showing through the lines of Princess Juille in Judgment Night - both are warrior-women with a hidden feminine side, fierce in defence of their realm, even to the extent of plotting murder of an emissary under a flag of truce! Juille is fighting a final, losing war against barbarians - in between skipping off to a pleasure moon for a few days to explore her feminine side. There is romance, battle, betrayal and abduction, all on spectacularly drawn worlds. This is full of action, with a surprising and satisfying twist at the end that changes all that you have read.

The other stories are all shorter, and show Moore's range. "Paradise Street" is a sci-fi western, which reads like Moore was channeling Leigh Brackett, at least until you realise she is in fact giving us an older and more hardbitten version of her own Northwest Smith. Jaime Morgan is a man on the edges of civilisation, on a planet that is now becoming civilised, perhaps the last of his type. Themes of freedom, civilisation and corruption all shine brightly, and if you liked Firefly and Serenity, you'll enjoy reading this. "Promised Land" is a story about humanity, alienation, and what makes us human in times of genetic engineering. "The Code" is a little think piece about the dangers of science, and "Heir Apparent" is longish adventure tale with a AI slant.

All of the stories are different, and all cover different types of "science fiction". There is something here for everyone, with the added interest for the distaff that C.L. Moore was one of the earliest female grand masters of sci-fi. If you are prepared to pay a pretty steep cover price, you'll find a work of art, on a number of a levels.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A WONDERFUL SOLO WORK BY CATHERINE MOORE 17 July 2007
By s.ferber - Published on Amazon.com
Henry Kuttner and C.L. Moore, the foremost husband-and-wife writing team in sci-fi history, produced their novels and short stories under a plethora of pen names, as well as their own, and for the past half century it has been a sort of literary game to puzzle out which author was the primary contributor to any particular work. This has apparently been far from a simple task, as either writer was perfectly capable of picking up the other's thoughts in mid-paragraph and carrying on. Catherine Moore has said publicly that many stories for which she was the primary author were published under Kuttner's name for the simple reason that his word rate was higher than hers; this, despite the fact that Moore was a longer-established writer. (I suppose that unequal pay for equal work was a factor in the 1940s even more so than it is today.) Despite the abundance of pen names--17, by my count, the most well-known of which were Keith Hammond, Lewis Padgett and Lawrence O'Donnell, that last pen name often being attached to stories written solely by Moore--one generally regarded truism was that when a work appeared under C.L. Moore's own name, that was a sure sign that the piece was hers alone. Such was the case with the novel "Judgment Night," which initially appeared as the cover story of "Astounding Science-Fiction" in August 1943, under Moore's name, and concluded in the September issue. (The team was so very prolific at this point, by the way, that its short story "Endowment Policy" also appeared in that same August issue, under the Padgett byline!) "Judgment Night" displays all the colorful, emotional elements that are the hallmarks of Moore's style. It tells the story of Juille, the headstrong, amazonian daughter of the galaxy's emperor, and her last-ditch efforts to stave off a revolutionary attack by barbarians on her Lyonese empire and, specifically, her home world of Ericon. Juille is somewhat similar to one of Moore's most popular characters, Jirel of Joiry, a medieval, swashbuckling fantasy creation who appeared in a series of stories in "Weird Tales" magazine in the 1930s. The similarly named Juille can almost be seen as a space-age Jirel, trading a traditional sword for a fire sword; a horse for a star cruiser. As with Jirel, her battling ways come into direct conflict with the pull of romantic entanglements. One of the more interesting aspects of "Judgment Night" is the simultaneous attraction and repulsion that Juille feels for Egide, the blond-bearded leader of the barbarian hordes; this reluctant undermining of Juille's "amazon code" gives her character some real psychological depth. The book, first and foremost, however, is a thrilling adventure tale, with several stunning set pieces: the initial meeting of Juille and Egide on Cyrille, an artificial, orbiting pleasure planetoid on which any scenario imaginable can be created by the use of films and what I take to be holograms; the kidnapping of Juille, and an exploration of the mysterious catacombs beneath Ericon; a visit to the gods of Ericon, who dwell in a dimensionless temple in the forbidden forests; and, saving the best for last, an hallucinogenic battle royale between Juille, Egide and his brutish henchman Jair, back on Cyrille, as the clock ticks away towards Ericon's destruction. This last section is a real tour de force for Moore, as her protagonists battle from one artificial environment to the next (from forest to desert to underwater to blizzard to beach scene, etc.), armed with mysterious superweapons discovered in Ericon's catacombs. Moore even manages to pull off a wonderful surprise ending for her story, as well as a suitably downbeat message regarding the folly of man and the utter waste of war. Juille is a wonderful character--brave, humorless, willful, spoiled--who changes for the better as the book progresses, and it is a shame that Moore never chose to revisit her again. I have read this terrific, well-nigh forgotten piece of Golden Age sci-fi twice now (in the 1965 Paperback Library edition pictured above) in a 25-year period, and found that I liked it even more the second time around. Fans of fast-moving space adventure told with colorful prose and emotional depth should by all means pounce!
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