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Judge Dredd: The Complete Case Files 16 (Judge Dredd The Complete Case Files) by [Wagner, John, Grant, Alan, Ennis, Garth]
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Judge Dredd: The Complete Case Files 16 (Judge Dredd The Complete Case Files) Kindle Edition

4.1 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

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Product Description

About the Author

John Wagner has been scripting for 2000 AD for more years than he cares to remember. His creations include Judge Dredd, Strontium Dog, Ace Trucking, Al's Baby, Button Man and Mean Machine. Outside of 2000 AD his credits include Star Wars, Lobo, The Punisher and the critically acclaimed A History of Violence. Garth Ennis first came to prominence as writer on Troubled Souls, the Northern Ireland-set series he created with John McCrea for Crisis. Alan Grant's prolific creative record speaks for itself. Outside the Galaxy's Greatest Comic, Grant is well-known to Batman fans following a lengthy run on various incarnations of the title. Dean Ormston's otherworldly pencils first graced the Megazine, where he contributed to the epic Judge Dredd Judgement Day saga, and pencilled the popular Raptaur. Dermot Power's lush painted art has graced Judge Dredd, Slaine and the Batman/Judge Dredd crossover The Ultimate Riddle. He is currently working in the film industry as a concept designer, where he has contributed to Star Wars, Harry Potter , Batman and Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Since joining 2000 AD in 1986 Colin MacNeil has worked on many strips, including Chopper - Song of the Surfer and Strontium Dog - The Final Solution. Cliff Robinson is one of 2000 AD's longest-serving artists, having made his debut with a Future Shock way back in Prog 362! Since then, he has co-created Mother Earth, and illustrated numerous Judge Dredd strips, as well as Future Shocks, Judge Anderson and Venus Bluegenes. Chris Weston is the co-creator of Indigo Prime: Killing Time, and has drawn a vast array of other 2000 AD and Megazine stories, including Downlode Tales, Future Shocks, Canon Fodder, Judge Dredd, Nemesis the Warlock, Nikolai Dante, One- Offs, Pulp Sci-Fi, Robo-Hunter, Rogue Trooper, Vector 13 and Whatever Happened To? John Burns' painted art has graced several 2000 AD series, notably Judge Dredd and Nikolai Dante, as well in as his own co-creation, The Bendatti Vendetta. Simon Coleby has worked extensively for 2000 AD provding the art for various strips including Rogue Trooper, Judge Dredd, Low Life and Sinister Dexter. Peter Doherty is primarily known to fans of the Galaxy's Greatest Comic as artist of the Young Death series, which opened Judge Dredd: The Megazine's first volume, but he has also contributed extensively to Judge Dredd, working on the epic Judgment Day as well as many shorter stories. Charlie Adlard made his debut pencilling Judge Dredd in the eponymous Megazine; since then, he's also illustrated Armitage and Judge Hershey in the Meg, and Judge Dredd, Nikolai Dante, Pulp Sci-Fi and Rogue Trooper in 2000 AD. Sam Kieth is perhaps best known for co-creating The Maxx for Image Comics, which he helped develop into an animated series for MTV. Having illustrated the first five issues of The Sandman he then went on to work on the Dark Horse Aliens mini-series Earth War.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 156967 KB
  • Print Length: 320 pages
  • Publisher: 2000 AD Graphic Novels (3 Jun. 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00KQMT3IM
  • Text-to-Speech: Not enabled
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  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #267,228 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

By G. Meldrum VINE VOICE on 27 Oct. 2010
Format: Paperback
About as hit and miss a `Judge Dredd' collection as it is possible to get, this volume of the future lawman's escapades leads `Judge Dredd' further into the dark days of the 90s.

The main reason to buy this book is the superb conclusion to the `Democracy' story arc, (`The Devil You Know' / `Twilight's Last Gleaming') which ranks as a classic of Dredd lore. The citizens of MC-1 are to be given a referendum on democracy, which, if the Judges lose, will mark the end of their reign of power. But meanwhile, Dredd is forced to deal with an internecine conspiracy that may destroy any chances the Judges have of winning. Pivotal stuff, which excellently showcases the level of maturity the Dredd strip is capable of.

However, the rest of the 2000AD material is, let's be honest, fairly patchy. By this stage, young Garth Ennis was firmly ensconced as regular writer of the strip, and whilst making a brave fist of it, even he freely admits it is far from his best work - understandable, given the daunting nature of writing 2000AD's signature strip, week-in, week-out. Ennis clearly has huge respect and affection for the strip, but often says he feels too `close' to Dredd as a fan to write it convincingly, and while he is probably doing himself a disservice (some of his final few Dredd stories were excellent), a lot of the stories in this volume just don't hold up too well. At its worst, the Ennis run was pointlessly obsessed with 90s pop culture, and while Dredd has always possessed a strong vein of parody, it overwhelms the strip in this era. Likewise, the art is moving into the fully-painted, sub-Bisley swamp that this period of 2000AD is renowned for, and whilst many of these artists will go on to mature spectacularly, their early offerings have a long way to go.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you're collecting these volumes then you have to get ths for a sense of completeness, but content-wise it's a bit of a space filler.

It features progs 736-775, the JD Megazine 1.11 - 1.20 - all featuring stories from Mega City One's years 2113-2114

Generally these collections contain epics, or a few big stories that are significant for the Judge Dredd timeline. Then they tend to be filled out with one-prog style spacefillers - what you get is the luck of the draw, as the volumes are exhaustive and cronologically ordered - sometimes you get a "Block Mania", sometimes you just get bits and bobs.

There's no epic in this volume, but a couple of stories that are significant

The Devil You Know/Twighlight's Last Gleaming. This run of stories closes the "Democracy" storyline that had been going on for years, with a rerendum to end the rule of the Judges

The Art of Geomancy. A follow up to the ongoing "Death Fist" storyline.

Justice One - a six parter set on space ships on the way to Pluto

Raptaur - a kind of "Alien" rip-off 7 parter.

The rest is just little stories - with a pretty varied quality of artwork - one or two in particular are pretty dire.

I'm still buying them one by one from volume 12 onwards - i bought the actual comics in my youth up to a certain age and now i'm "getting up to speed" on the stories i missed because I stopped; if the quality keeps diminishing like this i might just stop and stick to the classic early volumes.
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I love dredd I had decided to collect the whole collection a while a go so I get one every month I'm up to number 18 now

The art work varies from artist to artist
Most are very good ....i will try to get them all sooner or later
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Format: Paperback
Got given this a birthday present last week (v15 for Xmas). I stopped reading 2000AD just after Necropolis, so this is all new territory for me. Still enjoyable but doesn't seems to be building towards anything, although I see the next couple volumes have some BIG stories in them. But hey, it's Dredd! What's not to like?
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this was purchased for a loved adult grandson in law! He was absolutely delighted with it as it added to his collection. I know nothing about this iem but it did arrive in the usual Amazon superb condition and therefore I was able to hand over a pristine birthday gift!!
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