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I used this book as part of a travel health project and also went to the Captain Cook museum in Whitby. The book is a factual story but without the nonsense of fiction. The story of James Cook is fascinating and I really enjoyed reading it.
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on 10 June 2016
A good read for a Holiday
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on 28 June 2017
Pages were falling out of the book as I tried to read it. The book itself is excellent!
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on 2 June 2017
Excellently re-produced for Kindle.
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on 30 August 2016
no illustrations in ths version
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on 24 August 2014
An excellent journal of voyage and discovery.
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on 18 May 2017
A very good copy.
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on 2 October 2014
Great service......good seller. Many thanks Allan Dawkins
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on 8 January 2002
Although this edition of Cook's 'Journals' shows evidence of various levels of later tweaking and revision by Cook, it nevertheless retains a very vivid sense of all the practical and logistical difficulties that he faced in his three great voyages, to the extent that you can almost put yourself back into the situation that faced him at the start of his explorations when the South Pacific, Australia and New Zealand were virtually blanks on the map except for a few unconnected and largely forgotten landfalls by Tasman and others long before. Even when you know that he survived, it can be quite gripping when Cook is fighting his way around Cape Horn or picking an infinitely careful route through the Great Barrier Reef, and very nearly coming to grief in the process.

Cook's journals make plain what we find too easy to forget, how the business of exploring and charting unknown and often hazardous coasts was hampered by the limitations of working a sailing ship against prevailing winds, by a huge range of practical issues like finding fresh water and suitable food to keep scurvy at bay, and by unending problems of what we'd now call 'human resources' management - which in Cook's case included potentially hostile native peoples, drunken and unruly sailors and marines, and his accompanying band of aristocratic and self-important scientists. Cook often seems a dry and understated professional, but he occasionally shows flashes of what seems quite a modern sense of humour: 'he being one of those gentlemen, frequently found on board Kings Ships, that can very well be spared, or to speake more planer good for nothing'.

I found that having read the 'raw material' as it were, I at once wanted to go on to find more commentary and analysis to fill in the background to these extraordinary voyages. But this remains the basic source, and it's very useful to have it available in such an inexpensive and unobtrusively edited format.
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on 17 July 2001
This is a fantastic book... adventure, geography, science and history all rolled into one. It really is a unique experience to be able to read the words written during voyages that changed the worlds understanding of the Pacific and the globe in general. Do not read it however expecting a work of art in terms of the English language. Captain Cook did not write for a living, and sometimes sections of the book are hard going to the reader. However that is surely a small price to pay for a vivid first hand description from the man himself. I found it particullary interesting to read about Australia and New Zealand as they were, and before colonisation had begun. Cook is to Australians, as Colombus is to Americans. Buy it now......
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