• RRP: £19.30
  • You Save: £0.14 (1%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
John Tyler (American Pres... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by Nearfine
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Gently used. Expect delivery in 20 days.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

John Tyler (American Presidents (Times)) Hardcover – 9 Dec 2008

4.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£19.16
£16.27 £16.01
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£19.16 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • John Tyler (American Presidents (Times))
  • +
  • William Henry Harrison (American Presidents (Times))
  • +
  • Andrew Jackson (American Presidents (Times))
Total price: £55.56
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Hardcover: 183 pages
  • Publisher: Times Books (9 Dec. 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0805082387
  • ISBN-13: 978-0805082388
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 1.6 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,151,752 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Gary May is a professor of history at the University of Delaware. The author of three books, including the critically acclaimed "The Informant: The FBI, the Ku Klux Klan, and the Murder of Viola Liuzzo," he lives in Newark, Delaware.


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
John Tyler has long suffered from bad press. Derided as "His Accidency" by contemporaries who considered him unworthy of the office he inherited, he has long been marginalized as one of America's less successful presidents. Yet such treatment minimizes his considerable legacy. As the first vice president who succeeded to the presidency because of the death of the incumbent, he established a precedent for legitimacy that has been followed by all seven of his successors who followed his path to the White House. As president, he settled major outstanding differences with Great Britain and championed - and in the waning days of his administration, gained - the annexation of Texas. Such achievements suggest that his contribution to both the presidency and to American history have been seriously under-appreciated.

Gary May's book goes far towards rectifying this. His short biography provides a nice overview of Tyler's life and political career. Born into the Virginia plantation aristocracy, Tyler benefited from the wealth and connections it provided. He followed his father into politics, and served as governor and senator for his state before resigning on a point of principle. Yet May makes clear that his selection as vice president was made more for the lack of better alternatives than for his individual qualifications. With Harrison's abrupt death after only a month in the White House, Tyler spent nearly a full term as president, pursuing his own ambitious agenda despite his political isolation. Abandoned by the Whigs and spurned by the Democrats, Tyler found himself a man without a party, and was forced to abandon his hopes for another term as president.

Insightful and readable, May's book is one of the more successful entries in 'The American Presidents' series.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.2 out of 5 stars 38 reviews
18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Outstanding Addition to ther Series! 26 Dec. 2008
By S. Schockow - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
A clear, concise and totally interesting account of the life of John Tyler, one of America's forgotten Presidents. Mr. May presents a balanced portrait of Tyler's term of office, giving his readers a true picture of a President who worked tirelessly to do what he felt was right (not support the National Bank), regardless of party, and wound up losing his party affiliation because of it. The en masse resignations of all but one member of his Cabinet is also chronicled in vivid detail. The key role that Tyler played in the acquisition of Texas has been conveniently forgotten by historians and the author squarely gives Tyler his due. Tyler's flawed strategy of gaining land to "slowly eliminate slavery" is also examined. Tyler's support of states' rights is well-known, but Mr. May does not make it the focus of this volume.
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A superb introduction to an unjustly overlooked president 22 Jan. 2011
By MarkK - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
John Tyler has long suffered from bad press. Derided as "His Accidency" by contemporaries who considered him unworthy of the office he inherited, he has long been marginalized as one of our less successful presidents. Yet such treatment minimizes his considerable legacy. As the first vice president who succeeded to the presidency because of the death of the incumbent, he established a precedent for legitimacy that has been followed by all seven of his successors who followed his path to the White House. As president, he settled major outstanding differences with Great Britain and championed - and in the waning days of his administration, gained - the annexation of Texas. Such achievements suggest that his contribution to both the presidency and to American history have been seriously under-appreciated.

Gary May's book goes far towards rectifying this. His short biography provides a nice overview of Tyler's life and political career. Born into the Virginia plantation aristocracy, Tyler benefited from the wealth and connections it provided. He followed his father into politics, and served as governor and senator for his state before resigning on a point of principle. Yet May makes clear that his selection as vice president was made more for the lack of better alternatives than for his individual qualifications. With Harrison's abrupt death after only a month in the White House, Tyler spent nearly a full term as president, pursuing his own ambitious agenda despite his political isolation. Abandoned by the Whigs and spurned by the Democrats, Tyler found himself a man without a party, and was forced to abandon his hopes for another term as president.

Insightful and readable, May's book is one of the more successful entries in "The American Presidents" series. With its focus on their White House tenure, series is not always a good fit with its subjects. Yet with Tyler it is ideal, giving the author the ability to illuminate an often overshadowed presidency. Though the period is outside of May academic specialization, none of this is apparent from his command of both the historical details and the literature on the period. All of this makes May's book a superb starting point for anyone interested in an introduction to the life and career of America's tenth president, one far more worthy of attention than it has traditionally received.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Pretty well done biography of John Tyler 9 Oct. 2009
By Steven Peterson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Trivia question: Who was the first Vice President to rise to the Presidency as a result of the death of a sitting President? Answer: John Tyler, who became President after the death of William Henry Harrison very early in his term.

Tyler came from a goof background, owned a plantation and had slaves. He was a part of the so-called Virginia Aristocracy, and saw himself as one more in the line of Virginia presidents--from Jefferson to Monroe. To cement his place in the arena of the well-to-do, he married well (to Letitia).

Public service became a part of his life, as he served in Congress and the Senate and at the state level, too. He was uncomfortable with the Whigs (irony indeed!); he was an unreconstructed states' rights advocate, suspicious of a strong central government. The book describes the series of steps by which he ended up being selected as Vice President to William Henry Harrison (hence, Tippecanoe and Tyler, too). Although Harrison was elected as a Whig, Tyler was not comfortable with the party's positions on many issues (e.g., a national bank, a system of internal improvements, tariffs, and so on). Upon Harrison's shocking death, Tyler rose to the office.

This book well tells his struggles, as he opposes many of those among the Whigs, as he tries to advance his agenda against the opposition of many. He was not one of the more important presidents, but there were accomplishments (whether one agree with them or not), especially in international relations (e.g., United States' relations with Texas).

Some interesting personal aspects to this work. The death of his wide Letitia devastated him, but he soon found a much younger woman with whom he fell in love (scandalizing many).

Although he desired re-election, he had no support. He tried an abortive third party candidacy and gave that up for a purported deal with candidate James Polk.

Tyler remained active in politics, and was even involved in efforts to avert the Civil War.

Not one of the better known (or better accomplished) American Presidents. But this book does provide, in a brief biography, a solid introduction to this "accidental" President.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars And Tyler too. 10 May 2009
By Kevin M Quigg - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I found this book very enjoyable and a joy to read. May tells why Tyler does matter in American history. Without him, some other politicians would not have had the guts to annex Texas. He also settled boundaries with Great Britain over Canada. He had the courage to face Clay over his convictions on a Central Bank. On this issue, he lost the backing of the Whig Party and became persona non grata in the political establishment. His further support of the Confederacy alienated him from any Northern support and any legacy with historians.

A nice easy read about our 10th President. This is a nice summary of a complicated man.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The "Accidental" President 28 Oct. 2010
By Zachary Koenig - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
For the first time in U.S. history, a sitting U.S. President (William Henry Harrison) died in office, thus promoting the vice president (in this case John Tyler) into the "captain's chair". This is the story of that first "accidental" president.

Though the inauguration of Tyler started the presidential trend of moving away from the "Virginia Dynasties", and also moving away from the characters that are household names, author Gary May still manages to make the Tyler presidency both relevant and interesting.

What I really like about this book is its ability to shed light both on Tyler's personal life, as well as the background of his political life and times. Basically, there is nothing here to discourage you from continuing with this series.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback