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John Betjeman: Reading the Victorians Hardcover – 30 Sep 2008

5.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 254 pages
  • Publisher: Sussex Academic Press; 1st edition (30 Sept. 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1845192710
  • ISBN-13: 978-1845192716
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 2 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,496,173 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"In his analysis of how Betjeman "reads" the Victorians, Morse succeeds admirably. His own reading of Victorianism - and of Betjeman - is extensive, and the resulting book, which began life as a doctoral thesis, is an impressive piece of scholarship. His recourse to Betjeman's largely uncollected prose is all the more admirable considering that he completed his research without the benefit of William Peterson's masterful new bibliography, "John Betjeman: A Bibliography" (Clarendon Press, 2006), or Stephen Games's new anthologies of Betjeman's prose. With its chronological approach, this book will serve as an effective introduction to Betjeman, and Victorian scholars will surely want to read it for its account of the fate of Victorianism in the twentieth century. A thematic organization might have been a more useful structure, however, as some portions of the book may prove repetitive to readers already versed in Betjeman's life and works; for instance, Morse's second chapter, 'The 1930s', covers much of the same material entailed by Timothy Mowl in" Stylistic Cold Wars: Betjeman Versus Pevsner" (John Murray, 2000), and his attention to the production, design and reception of Betjeman's books has been thoroughly covered in Bevis Hillier's biographical triptych. However, Morse is the first critic to treat Betjeman's laureate verse with seriousness, and he is only the second, following Dennis Brown's brief but excellent monograph, "John Betjeman" (Northcote House, 1999), to treat "Summoned by Bells" with the seriousness that it deserves. Morse convincingly explains how Betjeman made Victorianism not merely palatable to English taste but central to English Identity." --"English Studies"

"Morse teases out the Victorian roots of Betjeman (1906-84), celebrated as Britain's most popular poet laureate since Tennyson. He follows the poet's career decade by decade beginning with the 1930s, looking at such aspects as chapel and spa, flag stones, campaign and caveats, the Euston murder, faith and doubt, battling with bulldozers, changing horizons, and the epic." --"Reference & Research Book News "

In his analysis of how Betjeman reads the Victorians, Morse succeeds admirably. His own reading of Victorianism and of Betjeman is extensive, and the resulting book, which began life as a doctoral thesis, is an impressive piece of scholarship. His recourse to Betjeman s largely uncollected prose is all the more admirable considering that he completed his research without the benefit of William Peterson s masterful new bibliography, "John Betjeman: A Bibliography" (Clarendon Press, 2006), or Stephen Games s new anthologies of Betjeman s prose. With its chronological approach, this book will serve as an effective introduction to Betjeman, and Victorian scholars will surely want to read it for its account of the fate of Victorianism in the twentieth century. A thematic organization might have been a more useful structure, however, as some portions of the book may prove repetitive to readers already versed in Betjeman s life and works; for instance, Morse s second chapter, The 1930s, covers much of the same material entailed by Timothy Mowl in" Stylistic Cold Wars: Betjeman Versus Pevsner" (John Murray, 2000), and his attention to the production, design and reception of Betjeman s books has been thoroughly covered in Bevis Hillier s biographical triptych. However, Morse is the first critic to treat Betjeman s laureate verse with seriousness, and he is only the second, following Dennis Brown s brief but excellent monograph, "John Betjeman" (Northcote House, 1999), to treat "Summoned by Bells" with the seriousness that it deserves. Morse convincingly explains how Betjeman made Victorianism not merely palatable to English taste but central to English Identity. "English Studies""

Morse teases out the Victorian roots of Betjeman (1906 84), celebrated as Britain s most popular poet laureate since Tennyson. He follows the poet s career decade by decade beginning with the 1930s, looking at such aspects as chapel and spa, flag stones, campaign and caveats, the Euston murder, faith and doubt, battling with bulldozers, changing horizons, and the epic. "Reference & Research Book News ""

About the Author

Greg Morse became interested in John Betjeman's work around the tenth anniversary of the poet's death in 1994. Having devoured as much Betjeman material as possible, he eventually began reading for a D.Phil at the University of Sussex.

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Format: Hardcover
This is a most intelligent and thoughtful work on Betjeman; the fact that it is written in a lively and engaging style further enhanced my pleasure. A book which looks back to the 19th century but is very much an appraisal of the man from a 21st century standpoint. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED FOR BOTH THE SCHOLAR AND THE CASUAL READER!
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Format: Hardcover
John Betjeman: Reading the Victorians by Greg Morse is inspiring for all poetry readers and literary historians. How is writing influenced by the past? Find out in Greg Morse's lucid new book. If you like Betjeman's work alredy then this book will deepen your appreciation of his poetry. Try it!
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