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The Jewel That Was Ours: Intermediate (Macmillan Readers) Paperback – 31 Mar 2005

4.0 out of 5 stars 28 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 112 pages
  • Publisher: Macmillan Education (31 Mar. 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 140507311X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1405073110
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 0.5 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 56,805 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Book Description

'A classic Dexter mix of mysterious corpses, intriguing clues, dreaming spires – and Morse himself' Today --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

From the Back Cover

He looked overweight around the midriff, though nowhere else, and she wondered whether perhaps he drank too much. He looked weary, as if he had been up most of the night conducting his investigations . . .

For Oxford, the arrival of twenty-seven American tourists is nothing out of the ordinary . . . until one of their number is found dead in Room 310 at the Randolph Hotel.

It looks like a sudden - and tragic - accident. Only Chief Inspector Morse appears not to overlook the simultaneous theft of a jewel-encrusted antique from the victim's handbag.

Then, two days later, a naked and battered corpse is dragged from the River Cherwell. A coincidence? Maybe. But this time Morse is determined to prove the link . . .

'Traditional crime writing at its best; the kind of book without which no armchair is complete' Sunday Times

'A classical Dexter mix of mysterious corpses, intriguing clues, dreaming spires - and Morse himself' Today

--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
For Oxford, the arrival of 27 American tourists is nothing out of the ordinary ... until one of their number is found dead in Room 310 of the Randolph Hotel. It looks like a sudden - and tragic - accident. Only Chief Inspector Morse appears not to overlook the simultaneous theft of a jewel-encrusted antique from the victim's handbag. Then, two days later, a naked and battered corpse is dragged from the River Cherwell. A coincidence? Maybe. But this time Morse is determined to prove the link ... .

That's the book in a nutshell and I am not giving anything away here because this is what it says on the back of the book. You can read it before you read the book.

Even though one can rather quickly establish an idea why the old lady is dead and who stole the antique and who might have done her in, all this does not seem to be important to Chief Inspector Morse. He completely ignores the old lady and her jewel and concentrates solely on the other corpse. In the end, he solves that murder and it does make sense in a way. He also solves the death of the old lady and the possible whereabouts of the antique, but these really do appear as an unimportant side-affair.

What I didn't particularly like about the book is that because of so many people involved - some of whom entertain rather interesting relationships amongst themselves - there are too many potential plots, which made it rather difficult for me to figure out what is happening. And because of that I found it almost impossible to follow Inspector Morse's train of thought. If it wasn't for his great reckoning at the end of the book, I would be left in the middle of nowhere.

On a positive note, the title of the book is excellent.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I never did see any Inspector Morse on the TV, so I'm coming to the Colin Dexter stories from the other direction. They are very good. Sometimes a little confusing, but they will make me watch the TV series as a critic. Will I enjoy them as much as the books?
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Today this seems a familiar story since the plot is almost echoed in the TV episode made from the book. But the original Morse books remain stimulating to read and the dialog is lively and fascinating.
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Format: Paperback
This is a very self-contained story that centres on members of an American group who are travelling around England on an exclusive tour visiting places of historical and artistic significance, and those responsible for the Oxford part of their trip.

As is not uncommon, Morse and Lewis do not appear at the beginning. Rather we are introduced to the tour leader, John Ashendon, the curator of the Ashmolean Museum, Dr. Theodore Kemp, and the events organiser for the university, Sheila Williams. The latter have been having an affair for some time but Kemp now has his eye on someone else. The Americans include several retired couples, including Laura and Eddie Stratton, and the very opinionated Janet Roscoe the bane of other group members, their hosts and hotel staff. As ever, all of these characters are hiding secrets and several are involved with one another.

Laura Stratton has brought back to Oxford the ‘Wolvergate Tongue’, part of a Saxon belt buckle that was part of the estate of her first husband. She intends to present this to the Ashmolean who hold the other part of the buckle. Laura and Kemp have been communicating about this and the latter is relishing the publicity. Unfortunately before the presentation can be made the tongue is stolen and Laura is found dead, apparently following a heart attack. Enter Morse and Lewis. Subsequently one of the main characters is found dead.

Dexter perfectly describes Morse’s manner of detection [‘One of the most extraordinary things about the man’s mind was that any check, any set-back, to some sweet hypothesis, far from dismaying him, seemed immediately to prompt some second hypothesis that soon appeared sweeter than the first.’] and the frustration that Lewis feels as a result.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The usual morse books promise eat deduction and good thinking and some credible situations. This one however, was a bit Chrstie-esque, with a coach load of Americans and a gathering and show-style explanation at the end. Still a good read, but not up to the plots of others
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Like all the Morse books this is an excellent and very enjoyable read. However, it is somewhat spoilt by "facsimile" copies of handwritten notes at several points in the text which simply do not work at all on a Kindle. These notes and letters may add to the dramatic effect in a printed text, but are shown in such microscopic form on the Kindle that they are illegible, unless you have a magnifying glass to hand, and even then it's difficult. What a shame, and surely something that could be easily rectified by reproducing those passages as text instead. Come on Amazon, this shouldn't be beyond your capabilities!
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Format: Paperback
Having read the other review I don't agree that the plots confusing. The characters are well introduced, though he cheats a bit toward the end in dragging us toward the convuluted conclusion. Nice interplay with Morse and Lewis, more of the (slightly unbelievable) irresistible sexual allure of Morse - and Dexter obviously testing our grammatical accuracy (becomes distracting). Other than that excellent Sunday afternoon reading - pour yourself a wine, the number of references to drink in the book it's almost compulsory.
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