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Japanese Destroyer Captain (NONE) by [Hara, Tameichi]
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Japanese Destroyer Captain (NONE) Kindle Edition

4.1 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews

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Length: 338 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product description

About the Author

Capt. Tameichi Hara was a destroyer squadron commander for most of the war aboard Shigure.

Fred Saito translated and expanded the original manuscript, after spending more than eight hundred hours interviewing Hara.

Roger Pineau added the footnotes and checked the accuracy of the battle accounts.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 3183 KB
  • Print Length: 338 pages
  • Publisher: Naval Institute Press; Original edition (14 Jun. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00CW0T4HQ
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #565,890 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This book offers certainly an interesting insight into the mind of a high ranking officer of Japanese Imperial Navy during World War II and also contains interesting reflections on various naval battles and Japanese admirals who fought them, beginning with the most important of them, Isoroku Yamamoto. It can however be only partly considered as a source of historical knowledge, as it contains also some factual errors and a lot of very subjective judgements, some of them pretty odd.

PRECISIONS

Before going into the heart of the review, it is important to precise that the subtitle of this book is very misguiding as captain Hara was nowhere near the attack of Pearl Harbor. As far as Midway is concerned, although he took part in the campaign, his destroyer ("Amatsukaze") was affected to escort of invasion fleet which DID NOT participate in the carrier's battle itself and hardly did see any action at all. He also didn't participate in most of Japanese victories, like Coral Sea, Savo, Tassafaronga or Kolombangara and he was not present at two decisive fights of Pacific War, the battles of Philippine Sea and Leyte.
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Format: Paperback
Captain Tameichi Hara was just over 40 when Japan declared war on the USA in December 1941. He fought throughout the war, first in command of a single destroyer and then as commodore of a flotilla. Having established a glowing reputation as the best torpedo tactician in the Imperial Japanese Navy, he was entrusted with the creation of a brand-new manual of torpedo attacking techniques which was published in 1932. Armed with large numbers of fast and powerful oxygen-fuelled torpedoes - far better than those of any other nation - Japanese naval officers were optimistic about their chances in any future war. But, as Captain Hara admits, they had no way of predicting the American advantage in electronics (especially radar) which eventually outweighed everything else. It is difficult not to empathise with the frustrated anger of Japanese officers and crews as, from 1942 on, they increasingly found themselves accurately bombed, shelled, and torpedoed by enemies who themselves remained invisible.

Hara claims to have been one of many officers (including, notoriously, Admiral Yamamoto) who felt the war against America was suicidal. But the Army high command was in charge, and the Pearl Harbor attack took place. Even then, Hara felt that Japan could at least force the USA to negotiate peace - but only if the IJN won every battle, and never made any mistakes. As it happened, especially at the level of grand strategy, there followed little other than mistakes. The hapless attack on Midway, the squandering of irreplaceable pilots, the foolish attempt to crush the Americans at Guadalcanal... it all culminated in the madness of Leyte Gulf, where the IJN wavered irresolutely between launching a last furious suicide attack and trying to damage the US invasion fleet.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Some of the best narratives emanating from the second world war are written by Destroyer men,the majority of these RN or USN,this one from the other side of the hill is one of the very best.Captain Hara never lost his initiative,so often the case in the Japanese millitary system of that era,he was also very lucky as he himself says,a fine fluid writer,the description of the loss of his cruiser in the air-sea battle that also saw the loss of the Yamato plus truthful criticism of Admiral Yamamoto and other high command personalities are just two of the many reasons why this book is indispensable to anyone studying the Pacific war and wanting a strong insight into the workings and mindset of the IJN.
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Format: Paperback
This book offers certainly an interesting insight into the mind of a high ranking officer of Japanese Imperial Navy during World War II and also contains interesting reflections on various naval battles and Japanese admirals who fought them, beginning with the most important of them, Isoroku Yamamoto. It can however be only partly considered as a source of historical knowledge, as it contains also some factual errors and a lot of very subjective judgements, some of them pretty odd.

PRECISIONS

Before going into the heart of the review, it is important to precise that the subtitle of this book is very misguiding as captain Hara was nowhere near the attack of Pearl Harbor. As far as Midway is concerned, although he took part in the campaign, his destroyer ("Amatsukaze") was affected to escort of invasion fleet which DID NOT participate in the carrier's battle itself and hardly did see any action at all. He also didn't participate in most of Japanese victories, like Coral Sea, Savo, Tassafaronga or Kolombangara and he was not present at two decisive fights of Pacific War, the battles of Philippine Sea and Leyte.
Read more ›
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