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Jackie, Ethel, Joan: Women of Camelot by [Taraborrelli, J. Randy]
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Jackie, Ethel, Joan: Women of Camelot Kindle Edition

4.5 out of 5 stars 41 customer reviews

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Length: 519 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

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Product description

Book Description

The New York Times bestselling biography of the Kennedy wives, now in a trade paperback edition to tie-in to Taraborrelli's new book, After Camelot.

About the Author

J. Randy Taraborrelli is a respected journalist, a recognizable entertainment personality, and in-demand guest on many television programs. He is the bestselling author of eight books. Taraborrelli is a reporter for the Times, Paris Match, and The Daily Mail and a contributor to Redbook, McCall's, and Good Housekeeping.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 5096 KB
  • Print Length: 519 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: B002QGSXFK
  • Publisher: Grand Central Publishing (1 Oct. 2000)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00FOTRD2K
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 41 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #19,728 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Very interesting
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Very interesting book on their lives so well written. A great read. Would recommend it highly.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Of all the books about the Kennedys I've read over the years, this one is one of the most revelatory and personal that I've yet read. Jackie and Ethel Kennedy I had known about largely through the supportive roles both played for their husbands in the prime of their political careers. Then there was the "Jackie O" phase and Jackie Kennedy's later career as an associate editor for Doubleday in New York. Ethel Kennedy, for her part, became the keeper of her husband's legacy following his murder in 1968. And as for Joan, the wife of Senator Ted Kennedy, prior to reading this book, I knew very little about her. Of the 3 women, she was, by far, the most modest, shy, and self-effacing.

The book is well-researched and contains 68 pages of 'Acknowledgements and Source Notes.' I highly recommend it for any reader with an interest in the life and times of a family who had such a profound and lasting impact on the U.S. cultural and political landscape in the latter half of the 20th century.
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By E. A. Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 22 Feb. 2014
Format: Paperback
Dozens of books have been written about Jacqueline Kennedy, the stylish wife of the late president. At least this one has some new information -- J. Randy Taraborrelli also explores the other Kennedy wives in "Jackie, Ethel, Joan: Women of Camelot." The problem is Taraborrelli's talent for making stuff up.

Jackie was a confident debutante who impressed (or irritated) people with her charm and refined sensibiltiies. Ethel a religious, exuberant gal who fit in with the rough'n'tumble Kennedy family. And Joan was a fragile, confidence-free waif who was troubled by alcoholism and her perpetually philandering husband Ted.

Taraborrelli explores their childhoods, early relationships, marriages and lives with their husbands, which peaked in the glory years of the so-called "Camelot." Then everything went downhill: Jackie and Ethel's husbands were assassinated, Joan's was permanently disgraced, and the three women went through nightmares of publicity, family deaths, miscarriages, remarriages and alcoholism.

The Jackie stuff in here is nothing new, nor does Taraborrelli have any new spins on it. In fact, she seems a bit dull beside the vibrant Ethel and tragic Joan, both of whom are revealed in all their tarnished glory. In fact, it's the information about those two ladies that keep this book from being a total loss.

Unlike prior biographers have done, Taraborrelli seems interested in the many facets of Ethel and Joan's personalities: Ethel was both ruthless and compassionate, utterly loving and very rough. Rather than portraying the forceful woman as a harpy, as others have done, Taraborrelli focuses on her complexity.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book never appealed to me because of the semi-fictional way it seemed portray the characters. However after reading through the first fe chapters I soon warmed to the writers style. This book is amazingly easy to read. I was reading on the way back from holiday on a 20 hour flight from Australia and at times I had to stop because I was crying so much. The descriptions of the consequences of the assasinations of Jack and Bobby on their wives lives was truly heart rending; and the book shone new light on the (often unhappy) relationship between Teddy and the lovely Joan.
Taraborelli compiled a fascinating and addictive book on three amazing women.
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By E. A. Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 24 Mar. 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Dozens of books have been written about Jacqueline Kennedy, the stylish wife of the late president. At least this one has some new information -- J. Randy Taraborrelli also explores the other Kennedy wives in "Jackie, Ethel, Joan: Women of Camelot." The problem is Taraborrelli's talent for making stuff up.

Jackie was a confident debutante who impressed (or irritated) people with her charm and refined sensibiltiies. Ethel a religious, exuberant gal who fit in with the rough'n'tumble Kennedy family. And Joan was a fragile, confidence-free waif who was troubled by alcoholism and her perpetually philandering husband Ted.

Taraborrelli explores their childhoods, early relationships, marriages and lives with their husbands, which peaked in the glory years of the so-called "Camelot." Then everything went downhill: Jackie and Ethel's husbands were assassinated, Joan's was permanently disgraced, and the three women went through nightmares of publicity, family deaths, miscarriages, remarriages and alcoholism.

The Jackie stuff in here is nothing new, nor does Taraborrelli have any new spins on it. In fact, she seems a bit dull beside the vibrant Ethel and tragic Joan, both of whom are revealed in all their tarnished glory. In fact, it's the information about those two ladies that keep this book from being a total loss.

Unlike prior biographers have done, Taraborrelli seems interested in the many facets of Ethel and Joan's personalities: Ethel was both ruthless and compassionate, utterly loving and very rough. Rather than portraying the forceful woman as a harpy, as others have done, Taraborrelli focuses on her complexity. And Joan is shown as a sweet, almost ideal girl who succumbed to a family disease as she was humilated in front of the entire world.
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