£9.99
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 11 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
It's Raining Cats and Dog... has been added to your Basket
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

It's Raining Cats and Dogs: An Autism Spectrum Guide to the Confusing World of Idioms, Metaphors and Everyday Expressions Hardcover – 15 Dec 2011

4.7 out of 5 stars 40 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£9.99
£5.91 £7.37
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more

Four for £10 on Sticker & Activity Books
Add four selected titles to your basket and checkout to receive your discount. Shop now
£9.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 11 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • It's Raining Cats and Dogs: An Autism Spectrum Guide to the Confusing World of Idioms, Metaphors and Everyday Expressions
  • +
  • A Different Kettle of Fish: A Day in the Life of a Physics Student with Autism
  • +
  • Survival Guide for Kids with Autism Spectrum Disorders
Total price: £33.75
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

Product Description

Review

The pictures are funny and thought provoking and each saying has the "translation" included underneath. I think it would be a useful "tool" for inclusion in any classroom and a great way to encourage children and adults alike to think about language and context... it could be a very useful resource for anyone studying English language or teachers and trainers supporting those who are learning English. -- Inclusion Now What a lovely book. It is just fun, rather than an insightful clinical digest... Reading this book will enable you to know what a "square meal" looks like and how to "give someone a piece of your mind"... It will be useful resource for staff training those who support people on the autistic spectrum, reinforcing how much of our everyday language is figurative rather than literal. -- Nursing Standard The book is helpful for both those on the spectrum and the neurotypical people who surround them. There are excellent, clear explanations for how and why these sayings are confusing. Simple line drawings clearly show the literal interpretation of each phrase. The meaning, in nonfigurative lanuage, appears under each picture. The book could be used in many ways with all children and would make a nice companion to Peggy Parish's "Amelia Bedelia" books for elementary school children. The foreword by Barton's mother as well as the introduction by the author also give helpful explanations and background, making the book more accessible to a wider audience. -- School Library Journal This book is simply enchanting from beginning to end and could happily sit on my coffee table as a book for guests to pick up and flick through... The drawings are gorgeous in their child-like simplicity and remind me of how I, and many of my adult family, draw. All the examples are amusing and instructive... The book is a 'must have', and would make a fabulous gift for aspies and their families but also for anyone working with children or adults on the spectrum, including the police, health workers and social workers, as well as the more obvious educationalist. -- asteens My son, Connor, is 9 and has a diagnosis of Autistic Spectrum Disorder. This book is brilliant! Michael's drawings are funny and insightful and have really helped Connor get to grips with the peculiarities of every day spoken English. It has improved his confidence to speak more freely and we have great fun reading it together at bedtime! -- Nicola Harvey, Connor's mother What a splendid book! It is a wonderfully clear insight into the minds of those on the autistic spectrum. I found it very helpful and very engaging and will have no hesitation in recommending it to any teacher. -- Paul Sanders, visiting music teacher, Bromley Youth Music Trust I have used Michael's pictures in training sessions with mainstream staff to show just what it means to have literal understanding. People are amazed and fascinated by the memorable examples he gives. The pictures give us a real insight into the difficulties in understanding spoken language experienced by people with ASD and clearly demonstrate the value of using visual supports. I have found them to be an invaluable and thought-provoking resource. -- Sue Carter, teacher of pupils on the autism spectrum Our English language is full of idiomatic phrases and inferential language which, when literally translated, has little or no related meaning. Many people with ASD may not recognise instances of non-literal language and have difficulty in figuring out intended meaning and consequently may miss the meaning of a significant part of an instruction or conversation...Michael clearly demonstrates this in an amusing and thought-provoking way in his book and has produced an excellent, invaluable tool to help people with ASD and anyone involved with ASD. -- Helen Bull, Specialist Advisor for Social & Communication Difficulties for Bromley Education Services I read It's Raining Cats and Dogs and was really impressed with both the content and presentation. The author superbly illustrates (in more ways than one!) the absurdities of the English language. Whilst I'd picked up many of the expressions over the years, his examples enhanced my comprehension and revealed eye-opening autistic interpretations of familiar phrases. -- Graduate with Asperger's Syndrome (late diagnosis) 'Michael's pictures are an excellent resource. I use them when I deliver training or write advice for schools as part of my advisory role within a local education authority. I always highlight the use of visual support to aid the understanding of language. These pictures provide a clear visual representation of everyday phrases and sayings which can confuse people with autism. I thoroughly recommend them'. -- Jane Rowland, teacher working with students on the autism spectrum, Kent County Council Michael's book is a really useful tool to help young people with ASD make sense of how non-ASD people see the world. It is also invaluable for non-ASD people to understand how confusing - and sometimes scary - our words can be for those who think literally! I highly recommend this book to anyone who works or lives with ASD. -- Wendy Warne, Family Service Manager, Burgess Autistic Trust A befitting and beneficial support aid for pupils which delivers a tactful and empathetic approach, this book doubles up as a valuable training resource to assist staff in opening a door to the often confusing and complex world of autism. This publication deserves its place on every school bookshelf. -- Debbie Newall, Complex Needs Specialist, Charles Darwin School, Biggin Hill Michael's book is a fantastic example of how people on the autistic spectrum take language literally. Everyone who knows someone on the spectrum should read this book to help them understand why spoken and written language needs to be as clear as possible. I just love the images Michael uses to interpret idioms and his sense of humour makes them particularly memorable. -- Michelle Cuss, Visual Support Worker, Burgess Autistic Trust Although It's Raining Cats and Dogs is especially valuable for autism spectrum individuals, children and adults who are learning English as a second language will also find it an invaluable supplementary reference and teaching tool, particularly due to the visual reinforcement of the pictures. Highly recommended, especially for school library collections. -- The Midwest Book Review This humorous picture book, written and illustrated by Michael Barton, made me laugh aloud... Barton's book deftly bridges the communication gulf between neuro-typical individuals and those on the autism spectrum... this book could be used to create a common language and style of communication between counsellor and client, and thereby begin to address the latter's shame and despair of feeling an alien. -- Therapy Today I think this book is really good, because it is hilarious, as well as helping me. I am good at language and expressions and I like to use interesting words when I talk and write, so this will be really useful for me... I feel proud that he wrote a book when he has autism, and I hope lots of people use it because it is very useful. -- Isaac Ramsay, Aged 9, diagnosed with high functioning autism. Young Minds Magazine This is a brilliant little book! Beautifully produced in hardback, it shows in words and black line drawings the difference between idiomatic sayings and the way the logical mind of a person on the autistic spectrum works. Michael Barton has Asperger Syndrome, and as a child he was taught these differences by using his own simple drawings. His method was so effective that he has now produced this book - and very helpful it will be... The little drawings are so funny - often laugh-out-loud comical - that parents and children will thoroughly enjoy using the book and will find that learning about the use of such phrases is a pleasure. -- Healthy Books

Review

The pictures are funny and thought provoking and each saying has the "translation" included underneath. I think it would be a useful "tool" for inclusion in any classroom and a great way to encourage children and adults alike to think about language and context... it could be a very useful resource for anyone studying English language or teachers and trainers supporting those who are learning English. (Inclusion Now)

What a lovely book. It is just fun, rather than an insightful clinical digest... Reading this book will enable you to know what a "square meal" looks like and how to "give someone a piece of your mind"... It will be useful resource for staff training those who support people on the autistic spectrum, reinforcing how much of our everyday language is figurative rather than literal. (Nursing Standard)

The book is helpful for both those on the spectrum and the neurotypical people who surround them. There are excellent, clear explanations for how and why these sayings are confusing. Simple line drawings clearly show the literal interpretation of each phrase. The meaning, in nonfigurative lanuage, appears under each picture. The book could be used in many ways with all children and would make a nice companion to Peggy Parish's "Amelia Bedelia" books for elementary school children. The foreword by Barton's mother as well as the introduction by the author also give helpful explanations and background, making the book more accessible to a wider audience. (School Library Journal)

This book is simply enchanting from beginning to end and could happily sit on my coffee table as a book for guests to pick up and flick through... The drawings are gorgeous in their child-like simplicity and remind me of how I, and many of my adult family, draw. All the examples are amusing and instructive... The book is a 'must have', and would make a fabulous gift for aspies and their families but also for anyone working with children or adults on the spectrum, including the police, health workers and social workers, as well as the more obvious educationalist. (asteens)

My son, Connor, is 9 and has a diagnosis of Autistic Spectrum Disorder. This book is brilliant! Michael's drawings are funny and insightful and have really helped Connor get to grips with the peculiarities of every day spoken English. It has improved his confidence to speak more freely and we have great fun reading it together at bedtime! (Nicola Harvey, Connor's mother)

What a splendid book! It is a wonderfully clear insight into the minds of those on the autistic spectrum. I found it very helpful and very engaging and will have no hesitation in recommending it to any teacher. (Paul Sanders, visiting music teacher, Bromley Youth Music Trust)

I have used Michael's pictures in training sessions with mainstream staff to show just what it means to have literal understanding. People are amazed and fascinated by the memorable examples he gives. The pictures give us a real insight into the difficulties in understanding spoken language experienced by people with ASD and clearly demonstrate the value of using visual supports. I have found them to be an invaluable and thought-provoking resource. (Sue Carter, teacher of pupils on the autism spectrum)

Our English language is full of idiomatic phrases and inferential language which, when literally translated, has little or no related meaning. Many people with ASD may not recognise instances of non-literal language and have difficulty in figuring out intended meaning and consequently may miss the meaning of a significant part of an instruction or conversation...Michael clearly demonstrates this in an amusing and thought-provoking way in his book and has produced an excellent, invaluable tool to help people with ASD and anyone involved with ASD. (Helen Bull, Specialist Advisor for Social & Communication Difficulties for Bromley Education Services)

I read It's Raining Cats and Dogs and was really impressed with both the content and presentation. The author superbly illustrates (in more ways than one!) the absurdities of the English language. Whilst I'd picked up many of the expressions over the years, his examples enhanced my comprehension and revealed eye-opening autistic interpretations of familiar phrases. (Graduate with Asperger's Syndrome (late diagnosis))

'Michael's pictures are an excellent resource. I use them when I deliver training or write advice for schools as part of my advisory role within a local education authority. I always highlight the use of visual support to aid the understanding of language. These pictures provide a clear visual representation of everyday phrases and sayings which can confuse people with autism. I thoroughly recommend them'. (Jane Rowland, teacher working with students on the autism spectrum, Kent County Council)

Michael's book is a really useful tool to help young people with ASD make sense of how non-ASD people see the world. It is also invaluable for non-ASD people to understand how confusing - and sometimes scary - our words can be for those who think literally! I highly recommend this book to anyone who works or lives with ASD. (Wendy Warne, Family Service Manager, Burgess Autistic Trust)

A befitting and beneficial support aid for pupils which delivers a tactful and empathetic approach, this book doubles up as a valuable training resource to assist staff in opening a door to the often confusing and complex world of autism. This publication deserves its place on every school bookshelf. (Debbie Newall, Complex Needs Specialist, Charles Darwin School, Biggin Hill)

Michael's book is a fantastic example of how people on the autistic spectrum take language literally. Everyone who knows someone on the spectrum should read this book to help them understand why spoken and written language needs to be as clear as possible. I just love the images Michael uses to interpret idioms and his sense of humour makes them particularly memorable. (Michelle Cuss, Visual Support Worker, Burgess Autistic Trust)

Although It's Raining Cats and Dogs is especially valuable for autism spectrum individuals, children and adults who are learning English as a second language will also find it an invaluable supplementary reference and teaching tool, particularly due to the visual reinforcement of the pictures. Highly recommended, especially for school library collections. (The Midwest Book Review)

This humorous picture book, written and illustrated by Michael Barton, made me laugh aloud... Barton's book deftly bridges the communication gulf between neuro-typical individuals and those on the autism spectrum... this book could be used to create a common language and style of communication between counsellor and client, and thereby begin to address the latter's shame and despair of feeling an alien. (Therapy Today)

I think this book is really good, because it is hilarious, as well as helping me. I am good at language and expressions and I like to use interesting words when I talk and write, so this will be really useful for me... I feel proud that he wrote a book when he has autism, and I hope lots of people use it because it is very useful. (Isaac Ramsay, Aged 9, diagnosed with high functioning autism. Young Minds Magazine)

This is a brilliant little book! Beautifully produced in hardback, it shows in words and black line drawings the difference between idiomatic sayings and the way the logical mind of a person on the autistic spectrum works. Michael Barton has Asperger Syndrome, and as a child he was taught these differences by using his own simple drawings. His method was so effective that he has now produced this book – and very helpful it will be... The little drawings are so funny – often laugh-out-loud comical – that parents and children will thoroughly enjoy using the book and will find that learning about the use of such phrases is a pleasure. (Healthy Books)

See all Product Description

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By Stewart M TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 14 Jun. 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I'm not really sure it's possible for a neurotypical person to understand what is really happening in the minds of people with an Autism Spectrum disorder, including Asperger syndrome. Although often referred to as High Functioning Autism, the literalist aspect of Asperger syndrome must be both baffling and frightening.

In some cases, people with Asperger syndrome will interpret all language literally as it is written and spoken. So when it is pouring with rain it really does rain cats and dogs and you really can give a person a piece of your mind. The confusion that this must cause is clear.

This books intention is to teach people to understand the (as it says on the book) meaning of "idioms, metaphors and everyday expressions".

With simple (well, childlike if the truth be told) cartoons the idioms etc explained.

The cartoons do make for entertaining viewing and reading, but I am a little concerned that they may be interpreted as meaning all people with an ASD view the world in a childlike fashion. This is very, very far from the truth.

The book will almost certainly be of value to many people - and it could have also have been used in English as a Second language classes if it had not been so clearly identifies as a book just for people with an ASD.

If nothing else, this book will provide a valuable reminder to people that everyday language can often be impenetrable to people with an ASD.

Having said all this I would still recommend this book to anybody who knows, works with, teaches or loves a person with an ASD.
4 Comments 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I am the mother of a nine-year-old who I suspect may be on the spectrum.

Idioms are his nemesis. I had no idea that he didn't know what 'Chicken out' meant until recently, or 'Pull yourself together.' My husband and I watched the TV programme about autism in which you featured and we realised that he and you had a lot in common.

He loves your book and uses it for reference and also for browsing, 'Oh THAT'S what it means,' is something I've been hearing a lot since he started to read it.

In response to the reviewer who was worried that people might think all autistic people view the world in a child-like way I'd say don't worry. I see it more as people on the spectrum poking gentle fun at neuro-typical people and our odd sayings, some of which are very odd indeed when we take the time to examine them!

Thanks again for a terrific little book...and good luck with your physics degree.
2 Comments 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book was "just the ticket" for helping to explain certain phrases and saying that were confusing my son who has autism and takes everything literally. One page shows the saying with a clear picture, and the page next to it shows what it means with a short explanation and picture. I was also pleased it's a hardback too as that will make it last a bit longer in my house! Really useful!
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A set of interesting misunderstandings of normal phrases, along with some decent cartoons. Pretty much what the blurb says it is, and I enjoyed it.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
My daughter is currently being tested for ASD. She finds idioms and sayings very difficult to understand so I thought this may help her along the way. She loved it and We all found the cartoons very cute and easy to understand along with clear 'transalation' as it were under neath.
My daughter is 11 and I feel it would be perfect for anyone with her possible diagnosis or any other child with similar issue over the age of 8.
Would definately recommend.
So impressed I will be referring it to the SEN at the local school...
thanks
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
My son is 7 years old and found this book very very funny! He's mildly Aspergers and can take things so literally. I think this book has already helped him to understand that things have double meanings sometimes. He took it into school for show-and-tell and the other children seemed to enjoy it too so I think it is a great tool for any child.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Fantastic book to enlighten all of us 'normal' people into the world of idioms and sayings that ASD people just don't get. Definitely recommend to anyone as light hearted and very informative.

I am a Special Needs teacher, many pupils of which have ASD so I will buy more for my colleagues.

Please spread the word about this book - it's fab!
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
No complex explanations or history of idioms Michael Barton just cuts to the chase and tells the reader the answer.... Well for some people idioms are a fiendishly complex language puzzle clearly invented to upset and ensnare the unwary. The illustrations are genuinely funny but again not too complex. Excellent.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Feedback