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The Irresistible Inheritance Of Wilberforce by [Torday, Paul]
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The Irresistible Inheritance Of Wilberforce Kindle Edition

3.8 out of 5 stars 63 customer reviews

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Length: 340 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

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Review

"Wilberforce...is good fictional company and the narrative voice Torday gives him...provides an astringently comic note" SUNDAY TIMES "This compulsive study of addiction proves Torday's mastery of the dark, as well as the light, realms of fiction" TIMES "a human story of real poignancy" SUNDAY TELEGRAPH "Torday, as he demonstrated in his debut novel Salmon Fishing in the Yemen, is an extravagantly gifted writer" MAIL ON SUNDAY "it becomes darker and more poignant with each eagerly turned page" BIG ISSUE IN THE NORTH "Unusual and intriguing, this 'Novel in Four Vintages' is a story of passion and addiction, identity and the desire to belong" GOOD BOOK GUIDE

Book Description

The new paperback from the bestselling author of the Richard & Judy selected SALMON FISHING IN THE YEMEN.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 706 KB
  • Print Length: 340 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0753823152
  • Publisher: Weidenfeld & Nicolson (18 Sept. 2008)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B002VCR0JE
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars 63 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #62,699 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Now here's a good example of why it's not a good idea to judge a book by its cover. Its design echoes that of Torday's wonderfully funny and original debut Salmon Fishing In The Yemen; so much so that, had you not read the reviews, you could be forgiven for buying The Irresistible Inheritance of Wilberforce assuming that you had your hands on another hilarious and rather touching novel. Well, this isn't very touching and it's certainly not funny.
In fact, it's a relatively dark read about the nature and destructive impact of loneliness. It's also, in rather a big way, about an almost sexual obsession with wine. The two themes are knitted together around a plot which is deftly turned inside out and re-ordered.
Torday is quite some writer: stylish and terribly readable. He has produced two such startlingly different novels that you wonder what's coming next.
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Format: Paperback
In 2006, Wilberforce is an alcoholic close to killing himself through his prolific wine consumption of four or five bottles a day. Regularly barred from the high-end restaurants he visits in search of the most exclusive and expensive vintages, Wilberforce does not appreciate that he is addicted; he views himself as a wine connoisseur, even when he wakes up in hospital from an alcohol-induced coma. From this engaging beginning, Paul Torday takes the reader back to three previous years of Wilberforce's life, in which we see the journey that transformed him from a young, successful businessman to a walking disaster area.

There are some darkly humorous moments in the novel, but for the most part, this is downbeat stuff. Whilst it is highly readable, a few things in the book don't quite convince; for example, the voice of Wilberforce as a man in his mid- to late thirties - even allowing for his decline and world-weariness, it's difficult to believe in the age Torday has given him. The fact that Wilberforce has a mystery family background and parentage, and that his first name is kept secret for much of the book, are curious asides that do little to add any sense of suspense or intrigue to what is essentially a tale of a messed-up life.

There are other problems. We don't get to know the Catherine character at all (although perhaps this is deliberate; she does not seem to have left an impression on Wilberforce as a truly real person, either).
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Format: Hardcover
A tragedy, told backwards. One reviewer compained that since we know how Wilberforce ends up from the start, it loses dramatic tension: no it doesn't. The tension comes from not how he ends up, but how he got there. Really excellent read.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this book because having read Salmon Fishing in the Yemen and thoroughly enjoyed it. This book although a good read and you do want to get to the end to find out what happens to Wilberforce although from page one you do know what is going to happen to him.

I found it a strange book. Wiberforce was an unlikeable 'hero' but then again you feel he was on a hiding to nothing in regards to his upbringing.
His so called friends were pretty much as you would expect of the idle rich. Andy& Dr Colin come out of the book best.

All in all it was not as good or funny as Salmon Fishing but it is a decent read.
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By Cloggie Downunder TOP 500 REVIEWER on 21 Dec. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
The Irresistible Inheritance of Wilberforce is the second novel by British author, Paul Torday. When Torday introduces his narrator, Wilberforce, it is 2006 and he is an enthusiastic wine drinker who owns an estate called Caerlyon Hall, the subterranean undercroft full of wine located under the Hall, and a flat in Half Moon Street, Mayfair. It soon becomes apparent, however, that Wilberforce is a virtually penniless alcoholic, a delusional widower who has alienated all his friends, squandered a fortune and is at death's door. How Wilberforce has managed to progress to this state from being a teetotal computer nerd who owned a multi-million pound software company is gradually revealed, but in reverse, in four parts: 2006, 2004, 2003 and 2002. Torday emphasises significant incidents (and his narrator's perception of them) with repetition of certain phrases and the retelling (with subtle differences) of certain events in each of the four parts. While it may be a dark and tragic tale, Torday manages to inject plenty of humour, and readers may well find themselves laughing out loud, at least in 2006. Torday's characters are well developed and often familiar: the socially inept computer programmer; the hedonistic heir to the title; the well-meaning doctor; the asset-rich, cash-poor gentry; the diplomatically fawning bank manager. Eck Chetwode-Talbot's name may ring a bell for readers of Salmon Fishing and both Eck and Ed Simmonds reappear in later Torday books, something that will appeal to fans. Although the outcome is evident from the beginning, it is a measure of Torday's literary talent that the reader is still eager to discover the who, how and why of it. At the same time, the reader is left a mystery to speculate upon (is Wilberforce's father among the characters?Read more ›
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