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Iron Council: New Crobuzon, Book 3 Audiobook – Unabridged

3.5 out of 5 stars 59 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio Download
  • Listening Length: 17 hours and 47 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: Audible Studios
  • Audible.co.uk Release Date: 8 Sept. 2011
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B005LVYH66
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank:

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
China has produced an exotic fantasy story that is enthralling and engaging in equal measure, a must read.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I enjoyed the first of the trilogy...book two was a fairly mundane plot smothered with over elaborate descriptions of the world of New Crobuzon something that this book has even more of it has a tendency to intrude upon the plot and characters .....so much so for me that I skipped quite large chunks ...,:/
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By jh on 14 Dec. 2015
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
as promised
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Format: Paperback
This perhaps the book in Mieville's loose Bas lag trilogy that sits the least well with the other two. Whilst the first two are excellent adventure stories, they can stand alone as incredibly inventive fantasy. Perdido could also possibly fit in the horror genre as well, Whilst The Scar is an excellent "pirate' tale (although i use that term very loosely, for that is only the basis for this excellent epic piece of fantasy). Both were marked by their excellent world building and characterisation, something which i hope means that these books will be around for a very long time. Iron council on the other hand, is a completely different affair to the other two, being a story set in an already defined world, but being a story more of ideas than anything else. The concept of the Iron council, the runaway train turned revolutionary state is excellent, and it is this idea that dominates the storyline, Characters and everything else fall by the wayside, although this possibly helps the narrative, with the sheer insignificance of ordinary people against the monothlithic state that is new Crobuzon, and the way they are just caught in and driven by events. The fact that the characters are less involving does make the end result a little less rousing than the other two books, but this is more of a slow burner, and is perhaps the most powerful of the trilogy. It's just so completely different from the other two that many readers seem to have difficulty making the transition. It can be a tough read, particularly as Mieville seems to have broken the english language, but it is well worth the effort.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Found this one dragged on, the ending wasn't particularly satisfying and the author's use of archaic and semi-poetic language soon grew tiresome to read. It's a shame as I loved Perdido Street Station
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Format: Paperback
Although any book of China Mieville's is always a treat, I didn't enjoy this as much as the previous two books in the series. I think maybe it just didn't have the same atmosphere.

The first book had New Crobuzon, The Scar was set on the floating city of Armarda and both of these were rich and vivid, full of life.

A lot of Iron Council is set out in the wide world, it's almost a wild west novel, and there is no strong sense of place that China Mieville normally does so well.

The journey across the landscape was interesting and eventful, and I loved the parts set in New Crobuzon. I also liked the descriptions of all the different races and the remade, and there's a lot of magic in this book, which is always a good thing!

I actually really enjoyed the first two-thirds of the book, but after that it gets into the heavy subjects and it gets very serious, and maybe a bit bogged down in it. The right at the end, things start happening so fast it's hard to keep up with it all.

Iron Council is a very political novel, it's about imperialism, corporatism, terrorism and revolution, touching on prejudice and discrimination. It's interesting to read about and certainly made me think, but it was difficult to get through the end. I had to make myself go back to finish the last 40 pages.
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Format: Paperback
Mieville sets a new bench mark for Sci-Fi creativity with this book. His inventiveness twists so many dimensions of culture, space, time and social norms that it can leave the reader reeling and confused. It is not just the challenge of imagining Mieville's many and varied creatures and landscapes that makes this book different. It is the way he spins what is essentially a heroic yarn - a group of revolutionaries try to save the city that spawned them - into a new millenium morality tale.

In doing so he treats the English Language as a watch-maker who is forced to mend a watch with a plastic spatula - it is so inadequate for the task at hand that Mieville invents a vast new lexicon to help himself describe the weirdity he has invented. Absolutists beware - it is rarely worth reaching for the dictionary as he has moved English on a phase and the dictionary has yet to catch up.

This is not a book for the prudish - his characters are raw, mainly male and spend quality time with each other and aliens. They are made to suffer physically and emotionally, perhaps helping us to divine the author's world view - this book presents life as a bitter struggle against domination by others, the oppression lifted only by hope for the future and stolen moments with those you love.

If you are looking for an easy read - this isn't it. It is no surprise that in working the imagination and lexicon so hard, Mieville loses readers along the way. So many literary special effects detract from the characters who generate little affection, and the plot itself is quite simplistic - just follow the spirals.

Despite that, there is real joy to be had throughout this book.
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