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An Invisible Sign of My Own by [Bender, Aimee]
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An Invisible Sign of My Own Kindle Edition

3.5 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews

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Length: 256 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

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Product Description

Review

"Intelligent and engaging ... [A] fanciful and original take on the quietly helter-skelter world that lies within" (The New York Times)

"An achingly idiosyncratic story rendered with eloquence, hilarity, and ominous precision" (Boston Globe)

"Light as a zephyr and unique as a snowflake" (The Washington Post)

"Fantastic! Bender has a perfect pitch. Her stories are fierce and true" (LA Times)

"Clever, original and written with brio and eloquence... Bender writes like an angel, with images that strike resonant chords, and her sly humour pervades every page." (Publishers Weekly)

Book Description

From the author of The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake, the story of one woman's attempt to prove that life really does count....

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 562 KB
  • Print Length: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Cornerstone Digital (29 Mar. 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B005TKBZLO
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #267,892 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Superb. Characters that stay with you for weeks after finishing and emotional twists that I am still beginning to understand.
Quirky and bizzare in parts this is an incredibly crafted novel on the emotional pain of life, death, illness and family ties. With two "fairy" tales at either end to sum up the characters changing view during the book, this is a tale of a 20 something girl who grows by interacting with the children she teaches her strange form of maths at her school.
Growing and dealing with the possibilities of death close to and far from her, and building a relationship she can deal with, Mona spirals and twists through this novel interwoven with the neighbours, parents, brief lovers and children all strong characters of their own.
Buy it, read it. Then read it again.
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Format: Paperback
I haven't read a book like it since "What's Eating Gilbert Grape". I found it completely refreshing to read about a heroine so flawed and yet so easy to understand and appreciate. There are moments of intense exasperation for the reader, yes, but ultimately worth it. Many of the characters, not just the main one, and especially her students, stand out as believable and honest. It's a little book that you can read in a few days. Enjoy!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I took a chance on this book as I really enjoyed "Lemon Cake", but I began to get the suspicion that I was going to dislike this one from the moment I started the book. Annoyingly "kooky" and centred on an irksome primary school teacher, the world in which the story is set resembles our own except for the laws of logic. I completely failed to see how anybody could possibly see this as an emotional or moving story as I felt nothing but vague dislike for almost everybody in it. There are moments when Bender's prose is lovely, but this only adds to the sense of disappointment.
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Format: Paperback
Mona Gray is the most annoying character ever. She is extremely unlikeable, and I honestly could not find any redeeming qualities. Page after page, she only got worse.

The book started out well enough, with a little background information on Mona and why she turned out the way she did (i.e. a quitter and a nutter). Her father needs a good kick to the backside. I don't even understand what is wrong with him, or how him pretending something is wrong is supposed to make me feel sympathetic towards him. I mean, you've ruined your family's life. You're a pathetic excuse for a man.

And Mona, who is allegedly some sort of Math genius? Fascinated by numbers, enjoys doing long division in her free time, and knocks incessently to ward off bad luck, is hired - almost forceably - as an elementary Maths teacher. Big mistake. This 20 year old failure can barely take care of herself, let alone take care of children.

And honestly, the kids were just as annoying as their teacher. I wanted to give them a couple of good smacks to get them in line. The interactions between her and these children, in fact, between her and anybody, were so uninteresting that I kept expecting something to happen. And this went on for pages and pages and pages worth of this relatively short book.

How can I feel anything for someone who eats soap almost killing herself and then using it to detract herself from sexuality, frequently tries to hurt herself or at least thinks about it, and brings an ax to a classroom, then stupidly lets a student hold it?!

This book ended on such a dull note. I mean honestly, I expected some sort of huge revelation. An epiphany of some sorts. There was nothing for me there. We end up as confused as we were at the beginning.
Read more ›
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Format: Paperback
Having adored The particular sadness of lemon cake I was really looking forward to reading this book. I actually didn't manage to finish it, it upset and disturbed me so much. Having lost many people I love to cancer and having a mother who lost her mind through OCD I could in no way find the reasoning behind what the author was trying to portray or achieve. If you have any of the afore mentioned in your life please don't read this book - it will be too much to bear.
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Format: Paperback
Aimee Bender has written such an original tale. I became utterly involved in her world and shared every emotion... You can't help but love her and her crazy life. It is written with grace and daring. What an engaging read!
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Format: Paperback
I bought this novel because I really enjoyed Aimee Bender's most recent novel 'The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake' and was intrigued to see what her debut was like, having missed it first time round (originally published 2000). 'An Invisible Sign of My Own' explores the relationship between adults and children and of how children try to make sense of the world around them. For Mona this involves numbers and counting yet in spite of her obsession with the logic of numbers she is also superstitious about them. Mona seems to be afraid of being happy and quits everything that threatens to make her so. Age 20 she becomes a maths teacher with a unusual style of teaching that engages her young pupils, but in the end Mona learns as much from them as they do from her.

The novel is peopled with fascinating characters, her old maths teacher who now runs a hardware store, the young science teacher who also has a unusual style of teaching. Even the children are unique and well drawn, each with their own problems and obsessions. Bender has an amazing and quirky imagination but you have to be prepared to suspend your disbelief and engage with the world she creates. Not as polished as 'Lemon Cake', but then I didn't expect it to be but it is definitely a debut novel that deserves a second chance at success. I am now going to read her short story collections 'The Girl in the Flammable Skirt' and 'Wilful Creatures', both published before this novel. The popularity of 'Lemon Cake' may have made Aimee Bender an 'overnight success', but it has been a long night!
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